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Upcoming Cross-Country Trip

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by OverJohn, Nov 11, 2018.

  1. OverJohn

    OverJohn Supporting Member

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    I'm planning on a trip from Santa Cruz California to near Savannah Georgia to see the family for Thanksgiving. I've been driving electric since 2011 (in a LEAF), but now that I have a Tesla 3 I can actually do it...

    I'll be blogging about the trip and my experiences as we travel (as well as charging in rural East Georgia) at Cross Country NO-GAS Road Trip

    I've just joined this forum and I'm looking for advice about the things I should be looking out for, what I should be taking with me, and really any advice on the trip - especially from those of you who have driven cross-country. Since this will be my first blog, please let me know what you think I should (or shouldn't) be talking about.

    Thanks!
    John O
     
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  2. NorCalEV

    NorCalEV New Member

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    Just did a round trip from SF to PDX -- 2 one-hour supercharger stops each way.

    Bring something to clean your windshield -- no squeegee / towels at supercharger stations (unlike gas stations). I picked up some of these at a local hardware store once I got to PDX.
     
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  3. KJD

    KJD Supporting Member

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    Sounds like a fun trip. I would add a charge point card and an ev go card to your glovebox if you don't have them already. They might come in handy for days when you are off the supercharger (Interstate) grid.
     
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  4. OverJohn

    OverJohn Supporting Member

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    Thanks. Great idea!
     
  5. OverJohn

    OverJohn Supporting Member

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    Yep. I brought these cards with me from my LEAF: Chargepoint, Charjit, eVgo, blink & SemaCharge. Not sure if SemaCharge is still around and I never actually used the blink card. I'll make sure they all have my new credit card though, just in case...

    I was thinking of getting one of those CHAdeMo to Tesla adapters so I could fast charge, but those things are expensive!
     
  6. Dayreg

    Dayreg Member

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    I've driven from the Childress Supercharger to the Denton SC in one go (skipping Ardmore and saving some time). That was in an S90D.

    Depending on your M3's range, weather conditions such as temperature, wind, rain, etc, you might consider this option to save some time. EV TripPlanner shows the direct route is 207.7 miles.
     
  7. OverJohn

    OverJohn Supporting Member

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    Thank you. I'm "expecting" ~300 miles total range, so 208 miles shouldn't be trouble. There are several places where the map on the website says to charge for 5 minutes. Not sure why. I'll play it by ear when I get there. I figure it will take longer than 5 minutes to go inside and pee...
     
  8. OverJohn

    OverJohn Supporting Member

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    Here are the extra adapters I'm bringing. The extension cord is a L6-30 (10 AWG) and I had EVSE adapters modify a 14-30 Tesla adapter to L6-30 (Tesla Model S / X / 3 Gen 2 Charging Adapters). Adapters w L6-30 extension.jpg
    Since the neutral isn't used, you can remove the pin from the 14-50 connector and it will plug into both 14-30 & 14-30 receptacles.


    Here are the L6-20 adapters I had left over from the LEAF (along with an L6-30R to L6-20P adapter so I can use them): L6-20 adapters.jpg

    I'm thinking of bringing my 30' L6-20 extension cord too, just in case I have to park a long way from the connector at the farm. Of course I'll tell the car to limit its current to 20 A if I use these.
     
  9. RayK

    RayK Active Member

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    Whoa! Hold off on the CHAdeMO adapter. As far as I know, these adapters still will NOT work with the Model 3. They will for S and X.

    Bookmark evtripplanner.com if you haven't already. It can be useful to plan out and/or check your route, although the built-in nav should get you to Supercharger stations with no problems.
     
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  10. cpa

    cpa Active Member

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    Sounds like a super trip! A couple of ancillary thoughts:

    I do not know your driving style or habits. But I know mine quite well! :)

    I have found that it is much easier to drive shorter segments, particularly later in the afternoon, as I get a little road weary. So, I generally make more Supercharging stops with shorter duration. Yes, the battery charges much faster at the bottom third than halfway. And there will be some segments where you cannot choose your stops. With the ~265 mile range of the Model 3 (factoring in speed, elevation, weather, and a reasonable buffer), you may find that stopping after 165 miles to recharge for 20 minutes and stretch your legs, have a snack, and visit the restroom might be preferable to skipping that spot and arriving 90 minutes later to charge for 35 minutes.

    Also, try to find hotels along the way that have destination chargers. That way, you can plug in upon arrival and unplug before retiring. Then plug in again in the morning before you pack up and go. No need to seek out a Supercharger until 3 hours or so into your morning leg if you leave with 90% or so.

    The onboard navigation works OK, but I believe it assumes the most efficient route and the fastest possible time including charging stops. You may wish to research the route that it selects to determine what you will be doing during your charging stops. For example, a friend drove from the Bay Area to Yellowstone. The navigation had him charging to 90% at Rocklin, skipping Truckee, and then charging at Lovelock for 50 minutes. There is absolutely nothing to do in Lovelock for nearly an hour. I suggested to him to charge at Rocklin to 50%, then charge at Truckee to 75%, then bypass Lovelock and use Winnemucca. Winnemucca is not much better but there is a casino proximate to the Superchargers to relax and grab a bite to eat.
     
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  11. FlyinLow

    FlyinLow Enjoy the journey

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    1. Plan your trip from home in the days prior using EVTripplanner.com for a warm fuzzy.

    2. Punch in your destination on the in-car nav and compare recommended charging stops to what you found out from other planners.

    3. Look at charging options around your destination while visiting using apps like PlugShare.

    4. Plug in your car while at your destination even if you can only use a 120V outlet with included wall connector.

    5. Returning home plan on hitting a nearby supercharger, leave with 80%, use in car nav to get home.

    6. Enjoy the trip. Blog updates can be done while at your 20 minute-ish charge stop.
     
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  12. 2012MS85

    2012MS85 Member

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    Looks like your frunk is already full :)
     
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  13. suwaneedad

    suwaneedad Member

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    Although I've not done this yet, if you are traveling solo you could also stay at a KOA or two, use the car in camping mode, and charge overnight by using one of the KOA RV campsites. Opens up a whole additional set of places to get electrons if you are running short or are just looking for a different way to spend the night without a hotel destination charger in play.

    Overall though, and particularly for your blog's intent of promoting EV use, I wouldn't bother with all the alternative trip planning sites.
    Just get in your Tesla and go. The car does a remarkably good job of telling me if I need to slow down to reach my next SC stop.
    That's more valuable to highlight to potential EV buyers than what will definitely seem like a total hassle "wait a minute, before I can take a trip in an EV I need to use websites and apps to be sure I can get from A to B?!" That's no longer the case thanks to Tesla's UX/software.

    Happy trails!
     
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  14. OverJohn

    OverJohn Supporting Member

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    My wife wouldn't like the camping mode, but I did lie down in the back and it wasn't bad at all... Maybe when I do a solo trip.

    That's a great point. I definitely do want to promote EVs (and especially the Tesla experience).
     
  15. 2012MS85

    2012MS85 Member

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    I'd love to do a coast-to-coast in camping mode and no hotels, but my wife wouldn't like how I smelled on day 3 ;)
     
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  16. FlyinLow

    FlyinLow Enjoy the journey

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    #16 FlyinLow, Nov 11, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2018
    For the purpose of your blog, do the planning on websites. Confirm for yourself the in car nav is sufficient.

    Explain this in your blog if you find it to be true.

    Talk about time management. Do things to stay productive while charging for 20-30 minutes. Resting is also productive.

    Describe driving with small breaks every two to three hours. See if you arrive refreshed. Do things on the way to enjoy the trip.

    Remember, the charger is inside your car. The connector your car comes with is merely a surge protector, filter, smart extension cord. Before blogging intensely please do research so you can be informed, helpful and seen as an authority on electric cars, not just Teslas.

    A supercharger is a direct DC connection to the battery, bypassing the in-car charger.

    Watch all the videos on the Tesla website to start.

    The only adapters you’ll likely use are the J1772 adapter for public charging stations, NEMA 14-50 for an emergency camp ground 50 amp charge in case of a road closure and 6-20 for trickle charging at your friend’s house. PlugShare is a great resource for finding destination chargers.
     
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  17. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

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    They don’t work with the Model 3, only Model S and X. Don’t worry, you have a 310 mile range car. Just charge at superchargers and try to stay at hotels that have Tesla destination charging so you’ll start the day at 100% (or at hotels that host superchargers). Use this map to find hotels with destination charging along your route:
    Destination Charging | Tesla
     
  18. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

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    I doubt you’ll be using any of those. You have a 310 mile range car, and this is 2018, not 2013.
     
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  19. FlyinLow

    FlyinLow Enjoy the journey

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    Probably not, but it’s apparent that this guy wants to feel well prepared for any contingency as he departs on his first long range EV road trip. Feeling confident, he will make this trip effortlessly and realize along the way he had nothing to worry about. His Previous EV experience is driving him right now.
     
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  20. Darmie

    Darmie Supporting Member

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    I can see your concerns now by reading your blog. Not sure how I personally would travel with a leaf myself. Actually I'm looking at getting a used leaf as a work car. Last year with our Model S we traveled from Texas to New England, over to Ohio and back down. I will say it's fun and not a concern at all on finding power for the supercharger network is alive and well. Yes, there are some good ideas here however, the navigation does a wonderful job with figuring out all the charging. If you want to back that up, you can always take a travel leg, multiply by 1.2 and add 25 to 30 as buffer. This helps with highway speed battery usage. Learn to trust your consumption chart and at any time there is a concern, just slow down.
     
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