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Using Dirty Electricity Filter to enable 110 volt charging

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by Papafox, Jun 15, 2015.

  1. Papafox

    Papafox Active Member

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    I am trying to charge my Model S with 110 volt electricity in a garage where I wish to store the car for a few weeks. The problem is that I get a charge cable fault when I connect the charging cable. I know the cable is good because I tried it elsewhere with a 110 volt output and it worked fine. I have already tried cranking down the charging amps to 5 amps but this makes no difference. My thought is that the problem is likely dirty electricity. Has anyone tried a dirty electricity filer in such a case, and did it work?

    I am storing the car at a location that is not my home (I live in Hawaii) and installing a 240 volt outlet is not a viable option. Any suggestions appreciated. I'd hate to give up a free and safe garage simply because the electricity is flaky. The car may be stored at this locations in the future for months at a time and in such a situation I would definitely need to have electricity available.
     
  2. mmccord

    mmccord Member

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    Sure the adapter is securely connected to the umc cable?. I got the same error plugging into a 14-50 in my brother's garage, and after removing the adapter and re seating it, it worked fine.
     
  3. MichaelS

    MichaelS Member

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    You might be missing a ground or the outlet is miswired (hot and neutral reversed). My suggestion would be to go to the hardware store and purchase an outlet tester. it's a small plug in device that has three lights on it and will tell you if the plug is wired correctly.

    GE 3-Wire Receptacle Tester 50542 - Voltage Testers - Amazon.com
     
  4. davewill

    davewill Member

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    It's distressingly common for someone to replace old two-prong outlets with 3-prong outlets. Since there's no ground wire in the box, they either leave the ground pins unconnected or connect them to the box which is also not properly grounded.
     
  5. Papafox

    Papafox Active Member

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    Thanks all for the suggestions. I think you're on the right track. The outlets in the garage lack grounding hole, so I suspect the outlet in the front yard I was using with a ground might not have a true ground. I will purchase an outlet tester and check it out.

    The good news is that I ran a 10 gauge extension cord from the kitchen to the Tesla and charging works! I have an electrician coming this afternoon and we will resolve the issue. I'll let you know what we find. Thanks again for the useful suggestions!
     
  6. Papafox

    Papafox Active Member

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    I tried an outlet tester and found that the one outlet I tried outside with a ground plug actually had an open ground. Thus, no good for Tesla charging. We'll see if the electrician can install a ground for the garage outlet today. That should solve the problem.
     
  7. green1

    green1 Active Member

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    I'm not sure where you would find such a thing, however I have an adapter that plugs in to a 2 prong outlet and has a ground lug you can attach to a known good ground and plug a three prong cord in to.... no idea where it came from though, but I would suspect it was designed basically for this exact situation.
     
  8. davewill

    davewill Member

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    If he ends up having to run a new circuit (not unlikely) have him either run a 240v circuit, or at least give you a dedicated, 20a 120v outlet.
     
  9. Papafox

    Papafox Active Member

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    Green1- Thanks for letting me know that such an item exists. I will start looking.

    Davewill, If I were to charge regularly from this location I would do as you suggest. Instead, I really only need this location to provide 5 amps of electricity to keep the battery happy as it sits in storage. I agree that for regular charging a 240 volt setup would be the way to go.
     
  10. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Member

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    Here is another solution for it. The site EVSEadapters.com has a lot of great adapter cables for Model S charging. One of the things they came out with is called the "cheater plug", which has a circuit to fool the ground detection in the Tesla charge cable, in case you do need to use an outlet that is missing its ground. It's $29.95. Here is the link to it.
    NEW! Cheater Plug: Charge from Generators or Inverters
     
  11. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    Ugh. This bonds neutral to ground inside the plug and can create a shock risk. As the neutral conductor is a current-carrying conductor, when you touch a chassis that is grounded to neutral and create a return path via the earth (or some other bonded metallic part) - e.g., bare feet on concrete, etc. - you can become part of the current return path and feel a bit of a tickle.

    I would pay to get the outlet properly bonded with a grounding conductor instead of using that adapter.
     
  12. Papafox

    Papafox Active Member

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    Thanks! These forums really are invaluable for taking a look at all possible options. While I will plan on fixing the outlet instead of using the cheater plug, I will carry a cheater plug on my upcoming road trip in case I get into a bind and need to charge from a generator.
     
  13. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    It's relatively safe to work with a portable generator because they're typically not earth-grounded with grounding rods nor is neutral bonded to the frame, so the shock potential from using it in that case is limited - especially when vehicle charging is unlikely to take place while other circuits are in use on the generator. I'm speaking only when that adapter is used in a home where the return path for current can flow via the earth.
     
  14. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Active Member

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    #14 ItsNotAboutTheMoney, Jun 19, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2015
    I really think it would be better to have a higher draw, even at 120V. Overhead at 5A would surely eat a large proportion of it. Unless there's inefficient system cycling on/off that would make separate charging event less efficient than a steady low draw, it seems to me that you'd want your car to draw a comfortable current.
     
  15. Papafox

    Papafox Active Member

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    FlasherZ, your comments have been very much appreciated
     

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