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Using / splitting an existing NEMA 14-50 socket between charging and other uses

oilerlord

Member
Jun 17, 2021
15
1
Edmonton, AB
Hi, first post. I pick up my Model Y on Tuesday.

My previous EV had the ability to set the maximum amps for charging in the car's menu. My Tesla advisor tells me this isn't an option with the Y. The setup I have is 50 amps available with this circuit split between two sockets. 24 of those amps are being used on one socket 24/7 for cryptocurrency mining equipment. The other socket is used to charge my current EV, I set the maximum charging rate at 15 amps (in the car's charge setting menu). Combined, it's a safe maximum of 39 amps being drawn from the 50 amp circuit. Since I don't have the ability to set charging amps in the Y - what are my options? The EVSE I currently have is a clipper creek 30 amp unit. It's pretty much a given, that I'd trip the 50 amp breaker as soon as I plug in the Tesla.

I guess one option is using the 5-20 plug that's supplied with the car + a NEMA 14-50 adapter. Any other ideas?

Thanks.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,219
3,190
Maryland
Your SA is wrong. You can set the maximum charging amperage on the Tesla Model Y Charging Screen. The maximum charging amperage is set by the EVSE (could be the Tesla Gen2 Mobile Connector or the Tesla Wall Connector or the ClipperCreek EVSE.) You can lower charging amperage from the maximum for the circuit. The Tesla Model Y should save this setting for your location but you may need to set it manually.

You can't however set the maximum rate when using a Supercharger.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,219
3,190
Maryland
Anywhere from 5A up to 48A*

*48A for the Long Range and the Performance Model Y; 32A for the Standard Range Model Y.
 
Last edited:

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,951
Boise, ID
Uggggh. If there was ever a thread where someone should just reply with the word "DON'T", this is it.

My previous EV had the ability to set the maximum amps for charging in the car's menu. My Tesla advisor tells me this isn't an option with the Y.
Your SA is wrong. You can set the maximum charging amperage on the Tesla Model Y Charging Screen.
That's a misunderstanding on the wording. The external equipment will send a signal to the car of what the MAXIMUM is, and the advisor is technically correct, that you don't get to change that part of it, but you can dial up or down how much of that maximum number of amps the car is supposed to use. So yeah, it's adjustable.

But then the rest of your questions are all kinds of wrong and dangerous.
The setup I have is 50 amps available with this circuit split between two sockets.
You should not be splitting that on a shared circuit.
Since I don't have the ability to set charging amps in the Y - what are my options?
Yes, you do have the option to set the amps, but that is never what you should rely on for staying safely within requirements for your wiring. What you really need to do is divide that 50A circuit into two separate circuits with two separate breakers--period.

24 of those amps are being used on one socket 24/7 for cryptocurrency mining equipment.
Then you should put that on a 30A circuit.

That would leave you with a 20A circuit for the car. Put in a 6-20 outlet on a 20A breaker and buy the 6-20 adapter from the Tesla store.

Sorry if this sounding harsh or something, but this is not something to play around with doing wrong. Do it correctly and safely.

A 16 amp charge for a maximum combined 40 amps on this circuit is perfect. Thanks guys for your "holy crap that was fast" quick responses.
Except that I hate the responses that aren't telling you that you'd better stop trying to share that circuit.
 
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oilerlord

Member
Jun 17, 2021
15
1
Edmonton, AB
A little harsh.

I get code / best practice. I've been using this setup for years on my EV, charging at 15 amps. The wiring, nor the circuit gets warm enough to become a concern to me.
 

Fourdoor

Member
May 31, 2016
873
696
North East Arkansas
A little harsh.

I get code / best practice. I've been using this setup for years on my EV, charging at 15 amps. The wiring, nor the circuit gets warm enough to become a concern to me.

Purchase a cheap 16 amp EVSE off of E-bay or some other EV forum for sale section, and use it with the J1772 adapter that comes with the car. Simple and cheap.

If the car really does remember your preferences for what amps to charge at based on location, then I guess that would be fine as well using your current EVSE, but when you first plug it in it will default to the 30 amps the EVSE is advertising, and you will have to jump in and crank that down immediately to prevent popping the breaker.


Keith
 

Twiglett

Single pedal driver
Oct 3, 2014
2,983
2,951
Austin
A little harsh.

I get code / best practice. I've been using this setup for years on my EV, charging at 15 amps. The wiring, nor the circuit gets warm enough to become a concern to me.
err - it isn't just not "best practice", especially with 14-50.
It is a real and present danger to life and property, code is there to stop house fires and prevent people from being killed, not just some guideline.
But hey, if someone feels the need to not be concerned got right ahead, it's your house.
 
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Fourdoor

Member
May 31, 2016
873
696
North East Arkansas
err - it isn't just not "best practice", especially with 14-50.
It is a real and present danger to life and property, code is there to stop house fires and prevent people from being killed, not just some guideline.
But hey, if someone feels the need to not be concerned got right ahead, it's your house.

Just like speed limits.

Keith
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,219
3,190
Maryland
You should probably set your Home Location in the Tesla Navigation System so when you dial back the maximum charging amperage the Tesla charging software continues to use this setting for future charging at this location. You will want to verify that the maximum charging amperage does not reset to the maximum for the circuit each time you charge.
 

oilerlord

Member
Jun 17, 2021
15
1
Edmonton, AB

Amazon sells several variations of the same product. 6 AWG copper, rated for use with a 50 amp current. I've been running mine at 39 amps, again, well below the rating for the circuit, and the adapter. I guess Amazon should stop selling all power bars and splitters too.

FYI, electrical code is not to exceed 80% load 24/7 on the main service or any given circuit. I'm not. Also, I'm not at all recommending this setup to anyone. Merely stating what's been working for me.
 

oilerlord

Member
Jun 17, 2021
15
1
Edmonton, AB
You should probably set your Home Location in the Tesla Navigation System so when you dial back the maximum charging amperage the Tesla charging software continues to use this setting for future charging at this location. You will want to verify that the maximum charging amperage does not reset to the maximum for the circuit each time you charge.
Good tip.
 

oilerlord

Member
Jun 17, 2021
15
1
Edmonton, AB
err - it isn't just not "best practice", especially with 14-50.
It is a real and present danger to life and property, code is there to stop house fires and prevent people from being killed, not just some guideline.
But hey, if someone feels the need to not be concerned got right ahead, it's your house.
That's a bit over-the-top right there.

Here's the code for splitters / taps by the way (for anyone that's interested):

14-100
(c) where the smaller conductor
(i) has an ampacity not less than one-third that of the larger conductor from which it is supplied; and
(ii) is suitably protected from mechanical damage, is not more than 7.5 m long, and terminates in a
single overcurrent device rated or set at a value not exceeding the ampacity of the conductor, but
beyond the single overcurrent device the conductor shall be permitted to supply any number of
overcurrent devices;

The conductors in this case are 6 AWG copper (actually rated at 55A). The cable is 3 feet long. The "single overcurrent device" is at 39 amps.

Please show me the section in the electrical code "especially with 14-50" where the real and present danger to life and property exists.
 

Sophias_dad

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Jul 29, 2018
1,465
1,492
Massachusetts
and terminates in a
single overcurrent device rated or set at a value not exceeding the ampacity of the conductor,
I don't see any overcurrent devices on the splitter you linked. Just sayin'.

BTW, I had not originally fully read your post. The fact that there's only one outlet on the circuit is fine. I'm not a big fan of the splitter, but you do you. Its >probably< not gonna burn your house down while you sleep, and that's good enough for me. :)
 

oilerlord

Member
Jun 17, 2021
15
1
Edmonton, AB
The fact that there's only one outlet on the circuit is fine. I'm not a big fan of the splitter, but you do you. Its >probably< not gonna burn your house down while you sleep, and that's good enough for me. :)
Yeah, nothing wrong with a good quality splitter or a power bar used safely. Pretty sure most of us have more than one of those in our homes, and aren't losing sleep. I guess people fear what they don't understand. Lot of fear in this thread.
 

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