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Vampire Drain

Discussion in 'Hong Kong' started by AC DC, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. AC DC

    AC DC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    Recently my 85+ was parked and unplugged for 24 days whilst I was travelling. It went from a 302km range to 120km. Average of around 7.5kms lost per day! Does this seem high?
     
  2. pinguhk

    pinguhk Member

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    Sep 23, 2014
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    296
    Location:
    hong kong
    wow that almost 40% loss in 1 day.
    There must be some thing not on standby and running the battery, try it again and see if it dose it again.
     
  3. SteveS0353

    SteveS0353 Member

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    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Vampire drain is typically between 1 and 1.5 kWh per day (way too much, but that's another thread). That equates to 24 to 36 kWh loss over the 24 days you were away.

    Assuming 302km range is about 70% SoC, then 120km is about 28% SoC, a difference of 42 percentage points. An 85kWh battery has about 78kWh accessible, so 42% of that is 33kWh; on the high side of the expected range loss over 24 days, but not unexpected.

    The lesson (and advice from Tesla) is to leave the car plugged in whenever possible, even to a low power source, just to feed the vampire.
     
  4. 3fiftynine

    3fiftynine Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2014
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    Location:
    Hong Kong
    battery_care.PNG

    The manual says 1% per day or about 14% over two weeks. I generally lose 5-10km (typical) overnight. Perhaps it's worth talking to service about this, I think you could completely turn off the car during prolonged storage but I don't know how.
     
  5. DITB

    DITB Charged.hk co-founder

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    1,568
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    At least, disable all the remote access in the settings when you know you are gone for longer time, although the down side is that you cannot track the car while you are away.

    And be sure not to leave your spare fob in the car, that will really get the electrons going (and possibly make your car very accessible to strangers)
     
  6. Lerxt

    Lerxt Member

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    Feb 21, 2014
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    Well interestingly enough, I'm in the middle of a 3 week trip and my app stopped communicating with the car after day 6. I was plugged in but I now cannot check the SOC. Even Tesla can't get through to it. I started at 50% soc and noticed that the app was telling me that the car was unplugged even though it started charging when I moved the charge slider...you can't rely on the app.
     
  7. DITB

    DITB Charged.hk co-founder

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    Location:
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    So the warp drive option has an extra electron hungry vampire in there? They probably have a standby minimum consumption to keep the delta field coils from de-powering entirely.
     
  8. Lerxt

    Lerxt Member

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    The warp drive is power hungry, but the convenence of being able to get to warp 7 on the way home is great. The speed cameras just can't catch me as the shutter speed is too slow.
     
  9. Cottonwood

    Cottonwood Roadster#433, Model S#S37

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
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    5,062
    Location:
    Colorado
    There does seem to have been a hardware improvement to reduce Vampire drain between my P85, Sig SN:00037 and my P85D built last 2014. I left them both connected to power while I went on a 1.5 week trip with energy saving on and always connected checked. The P85 Sig was running 6.2-101.36.2, and the P85D was running 6.2-2.4.153. I checked on them a couple of times in the 10 days, but did have charge alerts on so I could see when charging happened.

    Both cars started charging when they needed 9 rated miles and replaced the 9 rated miles. The P85 Sig charged 9 rated miles every 1.68 days or 5.38 rated miles per day, and the P85D charged 9 rated miles every 2.43 days or 3.70 rated miles per day. Even with the P85D rated miles being 5% more than the P85 Sig rated miles the P85D has a much less thirsty Vampire.

    Put another way, the P85 Sig Vampire drank 1.79 kWh per day, and the P85D Vampire drank 1.29 kWh per day with energy saving on and always connected checked. This is still a very thirsty Vampire, but at least Tesla seems to be slowly taming the Vampire's thirst.
     

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