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Vermont Tesla Owners

DDHEverything

Member
Aug 13, 2020
127
69
Philly
I am not sure if this is the right place to post this, so moderators please move accordingly:

We have been vacationing in Vermont for a few years now and are thinking about a move. We have a Model 3 and a VW ICE vehicle. I am wondering how people get by in Vermont with their Tesla's as there are something like 3 superchargers in the entire state. We would buy a fast charger for the house, like we have in PA, but I am concerned about driving longer distances as everywhere in Vermont is "far" away. Add to that range loss when it's cold, and we are wondering if it makes sense to own this car in Vermont.

Thank you.
 

Perscitus

Member
Jan 29, 2019
891
571
New York
Depends on your use and distance travelled daily/weekly. If a typical distance is within 30-40% of your estimated range, you will be fine.

I have had no problems driving all across VT and NH in a Model 3 in Summer and Winter. All around the White Mountains, Green Mountains, etc. ski resorts, hiking trail heads, towns, villages, dog sled camps, up/down Mt Washington, etc.

Superchargers are one thing, but dont forget to add L2 chargers and home/destination chargers to the mix.
 
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glide

Active Member
Jun 6, 2018
3,660
3,823
USA
I am not sure if this is the right place to post this, so moderators please move accordingly:

We have been vacationing in Vermont for a few years now and are thinking about a move. We have a Model 3 and a VW ICE vehicle. I am wondering how people get by in Vermont with their Tesla's as there are something like 3 superchargers in the entire state. We would buy a fast charger for the house, like we have in PA, but I am concerned about driving longer distances as everywhere in Vermont is "far" away. Add to that range loss when it's cold, and we are wondering if it makes sense to own this car in Vermont.

Thank you.
It’s fine if you have the charger at the house. I live in a neighboring state where there are less than a handful of superchargers and get along okay. The cold is really killer on the battery though which is one reason why I sold my S and picked up a Y. For the heat pump.
 
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ArcticStation

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Oct 10, 2018
181
270
Maine
I live in a small Maine town almost five hours north of Boston. We also travel often to remote parts of Atlantic Canada to visit family. I've owned my LR RWD for over two years and have never had an issue with year round use. However, I have made some accommodations.
Specifically:

1. Buy the long range version. Others may disagree with me, but I simply wouldn't drive an SR+ very far from home or away from an interstate in a Maine winter.
2. Consider buying a Chademo adapter. Often, and especially in rural Canada, a Chademo EVSE may be nearby when a Supercharger is not. However, this is an expensive piece of equipment and you should have some experience with the car before buying an adapter to confirm that you really need it.
3. Buy a house with a garage. This avoids having to deal with frozen door handles and charge ports (most of the time) and other Model 3 winter related foibles. Plus, it is usually easier and less expensive to install your EVSE in the garage rather than outside.
4. I put mud flaps on the car. I don't know if it will make a difference, but my counterparts in Canada say they are essential.
5. Plan on having your brakes serviced every year. The salt and sand coupled with little use due to regenerative braking is very hard on the brakes. Service costs around $200.
6. If you can afford to do so, maintain a winter "beater". My ten year old hybrid still runs great, it is affordable and when the plows are out and salt and sand cover the road I turn to my winter tire equipped "beater" to save wear and tear on the Tesla. Note, however, that my Tesla will one day become my "beater" when a new Tesla takes its place.

Enjoy the ride!
 

Cerberus

Member
Nov 27, 2020
9
5
Vermont
Have been driving electric in VT for about 8 years in various EVs, all with DC fast charging, except the eGolf, which just had level 1/2 capabilities. Drove a hybrid for about a decade prior to that. I drive about 15,000 miles per year. My daily commute is 40 miles. As the range on EVs has gotten over 200 miles (started out with an 80 mile Leaf) I have not really had issues with range verses available DC fast chargers. I just recently stopped charging from a regular garage wall outlet (120v) when I got the Tesla this Sept. I had a Gen 3 wall connector installed for that. There are way more Tesla SC stalls then there are DC fast chargers stalls (mostly EVGO here).
 
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tga

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Apr 8, 2014
3,997
2,860
New Hampshire
Random thoughts from a 4 year NH owner:
  • I've been driving a RWD P85+ in NH for 4 years; the S is our primary road trip car.
  • I've used all the VT/NH superchargers except for the two newest (Ashland, NH and Rutland, VT).
  • The VT/NH mobile service team is excellent.
  • Good snow tires on a second set of wheels is a good idea (for all vehicles, Tesla or other, 2WD or AWD). And none of that Blizzak/Michelin x-ice crap. Real snows - Hakkapeliitta R3's, studded 9's, etc. The Norwegians know what they are doing here!
  • I work from home but regularly go to the Boston area for meetings. I've driven to Montreal, Bar Harbor, NYC/Long Island, southern CT and Boston/Cape Cod, averaging 20k miles/year.
  • Lots of ski trips (Loon and Sugarbush have 80A destination chargers); I usually move the car after it's charged to free up the charging stations (I have an old dual charger car that only needs an hour or 2 typically).
  • Remote warming on shore power is nice (no loss of range for initial heating).
  • I park outside. On a couple of occasions I have needed to (carefully!) pry open the iced-over charger door with a plastic knife. My car is one of the early ones without a motorized door. I don't know if the new ones have enough force to push through the ice.
  • Only once have I had serious "range anxiety" - I spent the weekend in northern NH and drove around a bunch. I did not have on site charging, so I topped off at the Lincoln supercharger Friday night. Sunday afternoon on the way home, I spent an hour or so at an L2 in Littleton, NH, then headed to the Lincoln supercharger, but the supercharger was down with no warning on the nav. I spent an hour or so at one of the Loon chargers (with several other Teslas) to get enough charge to make it up and over the White Mountains, where I topped off at a Chademo at the Bradford, VT Hannaford's. The chademo stop and adapter saved me maybe a half hour vs a longer stop at Loon. If I do the trip again, the long promised Lyndon, VT supercharger will help. I also found some private destination charging that I think I can use.
  • The only other trip where I debated "Tesla or pickup" was a (summer) camping trip to northern Coos County NH. I went pickup, which was a good thing - there was lots of bad dirt roads that the Tesla's 21" wheels couldn't handle. No charging, and at least an hour from cell coverage.
 

RiverBrick

Active Member
Mar 23, 2014
2,526
1,741
Mount Washington Valley
tga said:
Only once have I had serious "range anxiety" - I spent the weekend in northern NH and drove around a bunch. I did not have on site charging, so I topped off at the Lincoln supercharger Friday night. Sunday afternoon on the way home, I spent an hour or so at an L2 in Littleton, NH, then headed to the Lincoln supercharger, but the supercharger was down with no warning on the nav. I spent an hour or so at one of the Loon chargers (with several other Teslas) to get enough charge to make it up and over the White Mountains, where I topped off at a Chademo at the Bradford, VT Hannaford's. The chademo stop and adapter saved me maybe a half hour vs a longer stop at Loon. If I do the trip again, the long promised Lyndon, VT supercharger will help. I also found some private destination charging that I think I can use..

Vermont is planning DCFC in St. Johnsbury and in Newport that may help people with adapters. They say by 2022, but the Lyndon/St. Johnsbury supercharger has been kicked down the road to 2022 as well.

Governor Phil Scott Announces New Electric Vehicle Charging Stations To Be Installed | Office of Governor Phil Scott
 

MikeHawk

Member
Feb 19, 2021
14
11
Burlington VT
Can't wait to join the Vermont Tesla owners.... getting a Tesla Model Y soon, haven't placed the order, waiting on the new Xenon headlights to come standard in all LR model Y's. Also hoping the Electric Cars Act, or GREEN act will get passed soon. So excited to get my Tesla, its all I think about.
 

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