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Video: F9R Flight Test | 1,000m

Discussion in 'SpaceX' started by doug, May 2, 2014.

  1. doug

    doug Administrator / Head Moderator

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    #1 doug, May 2, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 13, 2016
  2. Zextraterrestrial

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    #2 Zextraterrestrial, May 2, 2014
    Last edited: May 2, 2014
    I think it would be interesting to see a thermal image video of this

    could you see the side jets? and how much heat is around the rocket when it is descending though it's thrust.

    Is there a maximum horizontal wind that it is able to maintain vertical in?
     
  3. mkjayakumar

    mkjayakumar Active Member

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    Is this the highest - 1 Km - this test has been successfully done so far ?
     
  4. Mitthrawnuruodo

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    Well done SpaceX!!! I wasn't expecting any surprises before the (Millennium) Falcon Heavy reveal.
     
  5. efusco

    efusco Moderator - Model S & X forums

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    Wow, really incredible...

    But my favorite part was the cattle in the foreground of the ground level shot going "WTF, let's get outta here!"
     
  6. thelastdeadmouse

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    It is a little concerning to me how much smoke seems to be coming off of the landing legs for most of the flight. Makes me wonder about what kind of thermal protection they have, or if the legs and other sections near the bottom of the rocket will need to be replaced frequently. I'm sure when it comes to the total cost saved from recovering the rocket the cost of replacing the legs and other bits is pretty insignificant, but it could make for a situation in the future where the launch schedule is constrained by their production.
     
  7. Grendal

    Grendal Active Member

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    The good thing is that this is the testing vehicle. They can discover whether the legs are damaged in any critical way during the landing and, in this case, the take off as well. My interpretation is that there was a lot fire and smoke coming off the legs at takeoff. I'd bet those legs had something flammable on them like paint or fuel that burned off during the initial launch. By the time the rocket was coming in for a landing whatever it was seemed to have completely burned off.
     
  8. EarlyAdopter

    EarlyAdopter Active Member

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    The legs and any other components singed by the backwash could always be swapped out after X number of launches.
     
  9. JRod0802

    JRod0802 Member

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  10. scaesare

    scaesare Active Member

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    I suspect that the shrouds on the legs serve a twofold purpose: 1) To act as aerodynamic fairings during the launch and journey to hyper-sonic speeds, and 2) to provide thermal protection for the actual struts of the legs underneath (which appear to be either hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders) during the landing.

    Thus it would not surprise me if they are designed to be either ablative, or perhaps disposable all together.
     
  11. VolkerP

    VolkerP EU Model S P-37

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    The shrouds bear a pulling force, whereas the telescopic struts bear a pushing force. If one of the shrouds snaps at touch down, the rocket booster likely will topple over. It is crucial that they are designed to withstand the thermal exposure until the rocket is secured.
     
  12. scaesare

    scaesare Active Member

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    Agreed.... I'm simply suggesting that they are designed to deal with the heat, and as they themselves are not the units with the cylinder assembly portion of the legs they may even have a sacrificial/ablative coating on them in addition to whatever paint is burngin off..
     
  13. c041v

    c041v Member

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    On this topic, I wonder jsut how much issue they are experiencing in terms of heat? Obviously, something is burning, but I haven't seen any info indicating how serious, if at all it is.

    I would think if they were really having problems, they could try some sort of two stage deployment of the legs, The first setting increases drag and aids in stabilization, and the second setting is used for the actual landing.

    I'm going to peruse the NSF forum tonight to see what those folks have to say.

    Oh, and awesome video! Poor cows.
     
  14. doug

    doug Administrator / Head Moderator

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    In some of the Grasshopper flights, the legs also appeared to be on fire.
     
  15. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    Who knows what is actually burning? It could be an ablative coating. It could be residue from the engines themselves.
     
  16. HVM

    HVM Savolainen

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    Yes of course, SpaceX forget that rocket flame is hot...

    And ablative shields don't really burn they sublimate (and char, like PICA-X). Phase transition take some of the heat and rest is carried away with leaving gases (seen in the video).
     

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