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Video: Falcon 9 First Stage Reentry Footage from Plane

Discussion in 'SpaceX' started by doug, Aug 14, 2014.

  1. doug

    doug Administrator / Head Moderator

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  2. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    Wow! Mind blowing. It looks like the last image of the first stage showed it very close to vertical and kicking up water, correct? But the caption in the video says the camera failed to record "splashdown".
     
  3. rolosrevenge

    rolosrevenge Dr. EVS

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    That is awesome. Hopefully they have a floating landing platform for the next one.
     
  4. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    Let's get it landing on land next! And hire a videographer that knows how to use their video camera! Sheesh. But yes, truly awesome.
     
  5. Grendal

    Grendal Active Member

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    They took the film from a moving plane filming a very fast moving object. Not too bad really. Hopefully in just a few months we'll have a landing on a floating object which will then lead to an official landing on land. Then we'll really be cooking.

    Patience young Jedi.
     
  6. c041v

    c041v Member

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    You had one job cameraman...

    I kid! That video is awesome. Seems like they are going to be very well set up for the subsequent launches. I'm really really debating trying to make it FLA for one of these.
     
  7. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    If they did a first stage landing in Texas I would be tempted to drive there in my S to watch it. If I lived in Florida I would definitely want to see it in person.

    However, they might not let anyone get close enough to see it for safety reasons.
     
  8. claytorj

    claytorj Member

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    #8 claytorj, Aug 15, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 13, 2016
    Enhanced version:

     
  9. Grendal

    Grendal Active Member

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    That is just amazing footage that really makes me excited for what SpaceX is doing. That said, I am wondering about the angle the rocket had when it hit the water. If it was landing on land, I'm pretty sure the rocket would have toppled because of the angle.

    In thinking about it, it could easily have been that SpaceX was attempting to angle the rocket on purpose to avoid the toppling impact in the water to possibly save the rocket for recovery.
     
  10. chickensevil

    chickensevil Active Member

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    Or possibly to ensure it toppled on the side they wanted. I know on the last one before this, they specifically said it had a nominal oriantation waning it was vertical enough to count. Of that is nominal as well then I would say it is at least intended.
     
  11. JRod0802

    JRod0802 Member

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    #11 JRod0802, Aug 17, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 13, 2016
    Enhanced and stabilized version:

     
  12. jjkroll

    jjkroll Member

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    Remember that these heavy geosynchronous orbit flights don't retain enough fuel to land. Which means that this thing was running on fumes. Amazing it got as vertical as it did. Also, I believe that they will need the steering vanes, shown on a rocket flight in Texas, to actually place the rocket at a designated landing site. I could be wrong, but it seems really hard to land on a barge with just the rocket engine and a little leftover fuel.
     
  13. chickensevil

    chickensevil Active Member

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    This particular flight did not have the fuel issues. They had enough to carry out this secondary mission objective. Also they refire the rocket once in high altitude to give it a proper trajectory to the proposed landing site and also to do the initial slow down and reorientation of the rocket. There has been a couple proposed ideas floated around the various forums (here, reddit, and NSF) to identify how they would return the rocket back to FL verses landing in the ocean. with minimal fuel cost (keeping in mind that it doesn't take much because it is almost empty of fuel and has none of the 2nd stage or payload weight to deal with anymore.)

    The final rocket firing just before landing is what would give them the pinpoint accuracy and final proper orientation to land in a stabilized fashion.

    But yes, the steering vanes or whatever they are called would also help them with maneuvering the rocket.
     
  14. jjkroll

    jjkroll Member

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    Thanks, I didn't realize this was the July 14th flight. Initial trajectory is one thing, I just wonder about the fuel requirements if they end up a few hundred yards off due to wind or slight miscalculation of angle.
     
  15. chickensevil

    chickensevil Active Member

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    I'm sure all of this is built into the calculations. Keep in mind the pinpoint accuracy that they are sending off their payloads into orbit (many of which are not actually GTO) going out is likely far more variables and having one small overburn/underburn would cause a greater degree of missing your target than coming back down.
     
  16. jkn

    jkn Member

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    After watching video: Wind pushed rocket sideways. It compensated by landing not exactly vertical.
     

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