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Wall Charger v3 50 amp to 60 amp

I just recently updated my 120 amp panel to 200 amp panel and can now fully utilize the Wall Charger to 60amp breaker. I have the correct gauge to accept the 60 amp where i just need to replace the breaker.

Unfortunately, i no longer have the manual with the password to get into the settings to change the amp settings and really do not want to remove the base to find the password on the back. My question is, since the base is already connected to wifi to receive the latest firmware updates -- do you think it will automatically detect the 60 amp breaker and adjust on it's own? If not, any place where i can retrieve the password without having to contact Tesla or pull the base down? TIA.
 
I don't know the answer to your second question but from experience I think I know the answer to your first. I had my v3 Wall Connector installed on a 50A circuit so it should charge up to 40A continuous. When I first charged my car I forgot about configuring the Wall Connector through WiFi. On the car's display, I watched the current climb past 40A apparently on its way to 50A. I quickly stopped the charging and remembered I needed to configure the Wall Connector for a 50A circuit. That behavior indicates to me that the Wall Connector does not automatically detect the circuit capability but has to be configured for the correct current setting.
 
If it has already been "provisioned" it will not auto reset for sure.

I recently had the same issue of not able to find the wifi password. You can shut of the breaker to the wall charger, then remove the 4 screws (2 top and 2 bottom) to remove the front faceplate from the charger. On the inside of the wall charger cover is a sticker thing that has the MAC, the SSID, and the WPA2 (which is the password). You don't have to take the whole thing off the wall, just remove the cover which is pretty easy.

They really should update the docs/web page to say the pwd is on the inside cover of the wall connector. Maybe they don't want people to take off the cover since you can see bare wires.

This link has the details on how to connect

Then you can set it to 60 amp.
 
If it has already been "provisioned" it will not auto reset for sure.

I recently had the same issue of not able to find the wifi password. You can shut of the breaker to the wall charger, then remove the 4 screws (2 top and 2 bottom) to remove the front faceplate from the charger. On the inside of the wall charger cover is a sticker thing that has the MAC, the SSID, and the WPA2 (which is the password). You don't have to take the whole thing off the wall, just remove the cover which is pretty easy.

They really should update the docs/web page to say the pwd is on the inside cover of the wall connector. Maybe they don't want people to take off the cover since you can see bare wires.

This link has the details on how to connect

Then you can set it to 60 amp.
Definitely great info, thank you! I opted to call Tesla and was able to get the password in a few mins. 650-681-6133 option 3
 
Mine is on the left exterior side of the Charger, no need to remove anything but you may want a magnifying glass as it is rather small.

IMG_2840.jpg
 
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Been doing some searching. With the Gen 3 wall charge how much faster of a charge are we talking? If I understand correctly the 50a will get you 33-37 mph and the 60a will get you 44-47... anyone able to confirm this?

I have 50A now that the electrician put in, but when I received the wall charger I saw it’s saying they recommend 60A. So I’m wondering if it’s worthwhile for me to have electrician come back out.
 
I have the Gen 3 Wall Connector on a 240V/50A circuit providing 40A (9.6 kW) of continuous charge. It charges both our M3 and MY (separately) at about 34 miles per hour of charge. Make sure you have configured the Wall Connector for a 50A circuit. Changing your 50A circuit to support a 60A circuit will get you a faster charge but may be expensive if the the wiring for 60A was not installed or if your electrical panel needs a major upgrade to support a 60A breaker. The recommendation for a 60A circuit is only if you want to get the maximum charge rate out of your Wall Connector. If that increased charge rate matters to you, get a quote for upgrading the circuit and see if the increase in charge rate is worth it for you.
 
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I have the Gen 3 Wall Connector on a 240V/50A circuit providing 40A (9.6 kW) of continuous charge. It charges both our M3 and MY (separately) at about 34 miles per hour of charge. Make sure you have set up the Wall Connector for a 50A circuit. Changing your 50A circuit to support a 60A circuit may be expensive if the the wiring for 60A was not installed or if your electrical panel needs a major upgrade to support a 60A breaker. The recommendation for a 60A circuit is only if you want to get the maximum charge rate out of your Wall Connector. If that increased charge rate matters to you, get a quote for upgrading the circuit and see if the increase in charge rate is worth it for you.
Thank you
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,845
9,870
Boise, ID
I have 50A now that the electrician put in, but when I received the wall charger I saw it’s saying they recommend 60A. So I’m wondering if it’s worthwhile for me to have electrician come back out.
There isn't any "recommended" there. That is the maximum the device can support, but what you need is just whatever covers refilling the amount of miles you drive. People get these weird ideas of "I have this super powerful wall connector, or I have this really large battery. I must need to put in massive electrical upgrades." But you don't magically now have a 350 mile commute to work just because your car has more capability. If a 30A or 50A circuit fits your needs, then it just does, even if the car or wall connector could be set up for more.
 
There isn't any "recommended" there. That is the maximum the device can support, but what you need is just whatever covers refilling the amount of miles you drive. People get these weird ideas of "I have this super powerful wall connector, or I have this really large battery. I must need to put in massive electrical upgrades." But you don't magically now have a 350 mile commute to work just because your car has more capability. If a 30A or 50A circuit fits your needs, then it just does, even if the car or wall connector could be set up for more.
That’s like having a car that can only do the max speed limit. 90% of the time I could probably get away with 110v. Sometimes I need juice as fast as it can deliver therefore went the fastest available For home use
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,845
9,870
Boise, ID
That’s like having a car that can only do the max speed limit. 90% of the time I could probably get away with 110v. Sometimes I need juice as fast as it can deliver therefore went the fastest available For home use
I consider that analogy extremely deeply flawed. The reason people are evaluating this is that all things are not equal. There is frequently a limit to how big of a circuit people can do, according to load calculations and what their panel will support. And maybe (frequently) trying to force a 60A circuit crosses a line into thousands of extra dollars in huge upgrades to the whole system that might be unnecessary.

And for many people's cases, for the few times a year that they may need really fast charging for some reason, a trip to a Supercharger on the way might cover that more easily and reasonably and cheaper than the huge home electrical upgrade for something that may or may not ever even be needed.

See I was speaking to everyone's situation to make sure they don't have the misunderstanding that 60A is required. People can evaluate their own situations and do some middle ground if that is effective for them. By disagreeing with me on that, you are trying to tell everyone what to do. How about not?
 
See I was speaking to everyone's situation to make sure they don't have the misunderstanding that 60A is required. People can evaluate their own situations and do some middle ground if that is effective for them. By disagreeing with me on that, you are trying to tell everyone what to do. How about not?
Indeed.

What I read somewhere, and it made a lot of sense to me is the following:

  • Determine how much driving you normally would do in a day. What's the worst you're commute that you might reasonably have to do if you change jobs? Convert that distance to percentage of your battery capacity for your vehicle. Does it get really cold where you are? Add that to your calculation. Here in the frozen north I think you would potentially add 30-40% battery drain to handle winter conditions. Assuming you start at say 80% charge determine what your battery will be at for your worst commute on the coldest day. Maybe that's 50% remaining? 40%? 20%?
  • How long will you typically charge at night? Remember time of day power prices and maybe you want to constrain your charging to that cheap power pricing.
  • Find an EV charging calculator for your car and plug in how much time it takes to charge from your calculated amount in step 1 back up to 80% - using:
    • 24A (80% of a 30A breaker)
    • 32A (80% of a 40A breaker)
    • 40A (80% of a 50A breaker)
    • 48A (80% of a 60A breaker)
When I did this I found that a 40A breaker with 32A usable was going to be enough for probably 99% of my day-to-day charging needs. I had spare capacity in my panel and my wiring choice was suitable for a 50A circuit and the breaker cost differences were negligible - I ended up going with 50A. Going to 60A was going to mean a quick disconnect box + a panel upgrade and a service upgrade - easily costing thousands more.
 
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Gtzinck

New Member
Aug 22, 2021
3
0
Ottawa
I consider that analogy extremely deeply flawed. The reason people are evaluating this is that all things are not equal. There is frequently a limit to how big of a circuit people can do, according to load calculations and what their panel will support. And maybe (frequently) trying to force a 60A circuit crosses a line into thousands of extra dollars in huge upgrades to the whole system that might be unnecessary.

And for many people's cases, for the few times a year that they may need really fast charging for some reason, a trip to a Supercharger on the way might cover that more easily and reasonably and cheaper than the huge home electrical upgrade for something that may or may not ever even be needed.

See I was speaking to everyone's situation to make sure they don't have the misunderstanding that 60A is required. People can evaluate their own situations and do some middle ground if that is effective for them. By disagreeing with me on that, you are trying to tell everyone what to do. How about not?
Thanks. This is helpful.
 

Gtzinck

New Member
Aug 22, 2021
3
0
Ottawa
I consider that analogy extremely deeply flawed. The reason people are evaluating this is that all things are not equal. There is frequently a limit to how big of a circuit people can do, according to load calculations and what their panel will support. And maybe (frequently) trying to force a 60A circuit crosses a line into thousands of extra dollars in huge upgrades to the whole system that might be unnecessary.

And for many people's cases, for the few times a year that they may need really fast charging for some reason, a trip to a Supercharger on the way might cover that more easily and reasonably and cheaper than the huge home electrical upgrade for something that may or may not ever even be needed.

See I was speaking to everyone's situation to make sure they don't have the misunderstanding that 60A is required. People can evaluate their own situations and do some middle ground if that is effective for them. By disagreeing with me on that, you are trying to tell everyone what to do. How about not?
Thanks. This is helpful.
 

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