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Wall Connector

Discussion in 'Supercharging & Charging Infrastructure' started by stromb0li, Mar 28, 2018.

  1. stromb0li

    stromb0li Member

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    Hello Tesla Motors Club,

    I'm in the process of finishing up my garage on my new home and am planning on hopefully scrounging up enough to purchase my first Tesla in a year or so (anyone in U.S. looking to unload a model s? :)). In preparation, I've setup 3 electrical runs throughout my garage for future EV charging stations (one for each stall of my garage). While overkill to have 3 runs since I don't even own a single electric vehicle, I figure EVs are the future and planning this out now gives me flexibility to move my vehicle between stalls, will look nice and neat instead of running conduit over the top of the drywall/sheetrock, and also have spare ports if I have friends/family members are over and have an electric vehicle of their own. Again, probably overkill, but a few drinks in and my master electrician buddy going, wow you have more power than Clark Griswold, makes me feel warm and fuzzy.

    Currently, I have the wires just terminated in boxes for future use, but I was curious if I should bite the bullet early and go ahead and purchase the Wall Connectors to make things nice and neat or:
    1) wait to see if the technology changes in the wall connectors
    2) go with a 3rd party wall connector altogether to give me flexibility outside of charging just a Tesla (or should I use the Wall Connector from Tesla and look at adapters for other people)
    3) leave my "boxed" cables all ugly until I actually use them

    I'm not sure if the "guts" changed inside the Wall Connector when the Model 3 was released or if it's the exact same hardware, so my hesitation would be if they were to release some drastic change within the next year or so. While not a big deal, I'm kinda a neat freak and like to finish projects before moving onto the next one, so I'm anxious to "finish" the garage, but if I have some advise and you think to wait, then at least I can say the pros told me to wait and I'll sleep slightly better :)

    Appreciate any thoughts in advance,
    -stromb0li

    P.S. Here are some pictures if you are curious on what the setup looks like. This should allow up to 100 Amps at 240V to any of the three charges. Since I added the "Communication line", which tells the Wall Connectors that more than one vehicle is charging, allows me to get away having all three without having to purchase another meter on the outside of my home. Future plan is to work with the electric company to "Off peak" the chargers, so I can charge at a cheaper rate.

    Here's a picture of the massive 2-2-2-4 wire:
    [​IMG]

    We ran conduit from the panel in my basement out to the garage and up into the rafters. Here you can see conduit for future a/v/network cables (dark gray), a second metal conduit pipe containing the electrical cables for the charges, and the third massive pipe for radon.
    [​IMG]

    From there, we terminate all three runs to a single point:. You can see the conduit on the left side going back over to where it came up from the basement. Each other run is tacked and headed down between rafters.
    [​IMG]


    Here is another with all three runs feeding back. We ran an extra line as well for flexibility down the road (Black, White, Red, Green, unshielded copper) to allow for a three phase circuit:
    [​IMG]

    Here you can see a single run with the "Comm" line. The "Comm" or Communication line is just a single 16 AWG solid core wire rated for 600V.
    [​IMG]

    Here's what it looks like now with the sheetrock/drywall and the cables boxed for future use.
    [​IMG]
     
    • Like x 1
  2. ShawnA

    ShawnA Supporting Member

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    Hi Stromb0li,

    Welcome to TMC !!!

    You sure have taken on an ambitious Project.

    I always begin electrical commentary/guidance with the statement that I am NOT an electrician.
    I do have a few Tesla cars and a variety of chargers to keep them happy.

    The only comment I would make is about your communication wires.
    You said they are a single 16 AWG solid core rated for 600 V.
    In the Wall Connector, 80A Single Phase Installation Manual
    on page 28 appendix B: Optional Connection for Load Sharing
    It states that "A 600V rated, minimum 18 AWG (1 mm), 2 conductor shielded twisted-pair
    wire must be used when creating a local network for load sharing."

    Your 16 AWG is a heavier wire than 18 AWG but your solid core wire does not seem to be twisted-pair
    which is needed to eliminate any induced voltages in the load sharing communication circuits.
    I might have misunderstood what you meant in your description.

    Good Luck and again welcome,

    Shawn
     
  3. stromb0li

    stromb0li Member

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    Aww, dang it won't let me edit my post. Good catch. I actually used 18/2 AWG shielded stranded pair. Not sure why I wrote 16 AWG solid.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. David29

    David29 Supporting Member

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    Impressive setup! My advice is to leave it wired and do nothing more until you are closer to having an EV. Technology changes, new brands of cars are emerging, etc. An option would be to install one EV charger that could be used by a guest in the next year until you have your own. For that, you would not want a Tesla device because the connector is proprietary. So I would consider getting a Clipper Creek or something similar that a guest could use for their EV (or Plug-in hybrid) and that a Tesla could also use.
     
  5. ShawnA

    ShawnA Supporting Member

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    Hi Stromb0li,

    Not letting you edit the post is a good thing...

    Using the correct wire is even better. You will be fine.

    Good job,

    Welcome!

    Shawn
     
  6. GSP

    GSP Member

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    Nice setup!

    I also recommend not getting wall connectors until you are close to getting your car. That way you can get the latest technology, whatever it may be. Even if there are no tech updates, you still can put your money to work for you in the meantime. Maybe buy a few TSLA shares? :)

    GSP
     
  7. stromb0li

    stromb0li Member

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    Thanks David! Do you know of any other wall connectors that might understand the load sharing?

    Thanks Shawn!

    Haha, no kidding! The stock market has been an unforgiving beast to a few companies this month. Poor guys, can't catch a break from the media at all. In the words of the joker "If, tomorrow, I tell the press that, like, a [ICE car will burn], nobody panics, because it's all "part of the plan". But when I say that one [tesla catches fire], well then everyone loses their minds! "... I think that's how that quote goes.
     
  8. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    Both Tesla and Clipper Creek have load sharing options. But I think it is only with like chargers. So two Clipper Creek or two or three Tesla’s ganged together.

    That said I installed three NEMA 14-50s in my garage as one can always add a plug to a charging station.
     
  9. miimura

    miimura Well-Known Member

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    JuiceBox also has load sharing.

    My only other comment is that I would have put a sub-panel in the garage instead of a junction box. It would have given you more flexibility in how to deploy EVSEs in the future. I don't know if you're allowed by code to install a single 40 amp EVSE on that circuit tree that is fed by a 100 amp breaker. Although, I suppose if two are still blanked off, you could change the breaker to 50 amps and be able to pass inspection. They may require you do disconnect the inactive branches though. Certainly you would want to insulate the ends of the wires in the unused boxes if they were live.
     
    • Like x 1
  10. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Well-Known Member

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    I have no technical expertise in this area, but when our house was completely rewired for both data and electricity (240V here in UK) the two were not placed next to each other, and only crossed at 90-degrees.

    Might yours need to be further apart?
     
  11. TechVP

    TechVP Active Poster

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    Highly Recommended:
    The home Tesla charging FAQ is located HERE.
    It includes estimating, wiring, conduit, box etc. advise.

    If you are using Romex (cables bundled), definitely check up on its intended and allowed use. Most of the installs I've seen, and what I used was THHN in conduit. Go with your local codes, as required.

    -TechVP
     
  12. stromb0li

    stromb0li Member

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    This passed wiring certification by the city inspector, I don't think we have any codes around running low voltage wire at all. The conduit containing power is all encased in the metal conduit where as the low voltage items are in the PVC pipe. Between the two, I think ESD should be fairly mitigated. I plan on running a few network runs; those being STP should help quite a bit as well.

    Unfortunately I'm traveling and can't run to look at what was used, but I'm 95% sure we used THHN cables as well. When the city inspector came they had to double check the wire was rated for use on an exterior wall due to high fluctuating temperatures between the seasons. The only thing I almost got dinged on was the inspector was not happy having 3 chargers on the same 100 amp circuit. Until I was able to provide documentation by the manufacturer of the charger (in this case I used Tesla's Wall Connectors), they were requiring all home owners to run separate circuits to each EV charger as they haven't see anything around load sharing. Pays to read the documentation I guess... alternative was to pull 3 separate 100 amp circuits and work with the city to pay for another main/meter pulled the house. That would have made the project much more expensive.
     
  13. brkaus

    brkaus Well-Known Member

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    I would wait on the Wall connectors.

    Other brands make load sharing wall connectors. But hard to match the price point of the tesla HPWC. Esp if you’re looking at going over 40a.
     
  14. stromb0li

    stromb0li Member

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  15. ai4px

    ai4px Wes

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  16. miimura

    miimura Well-Known Member

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