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Warning: You can get FSD beta strike for any forced disengagement, even with FSD beta disabled in settings...

Question guys, I'm on the latest FSDB update and received a strike today, yay...

So am I supposed to have a total of 5 chances (strikes) before I'm kicked out of the FSDB or 3?

I'm currently on 2022.20.18 (FSD Beta 10.69.2.3).
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As another data point about over-speed-limit disengagements: I've had multiple of these on both 10.12 and 10.69 while on the freeway (running the NoA stack), during drives that started out as FSDb drives (enabled and in use) before I merged onto the highway and it auto-switched to NoA. It will give the big scary red hands, and disable all autopilot stuff till the end of the drive, but they do *not* count as FSDb strikes (of which I still have zero)
How can we know how many strikes out of a total of 5 we have?
 

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I’m a relatively new Tesla owner with a 2023 MY and live in Minnesnowta and use FSD Beta. While I don’t have any strikes (yet) I’ve found I don’t use FSD often because when I do I get the red wheel warning due to the car driving too aggressively… in other words, quicker than normal acceleration and faster into turns for winter driving conditions.

I do not engage FSD in snowy weather, just as I would not use cruise control in snowy conditions. However a slippery spot on a bend and the car reacts as if I’ve done something wrong, rather than handling it itself with traction control.

I’ve gotten to the point that I don’t attempt to use FSD below ~35 degrees. Anyone else in colder climates have a similar experience? Seems like the programmers for FSD only plan for dry road conditions…
 
I’m a relatively new Tesla owner with a 2023 MY and live in Minnesnowta and use FSD Beta. While I don’t have any strikes (yet) I’ve found I don’t use FSD often because when I do I get the red wheel warning due to the car driving too aggressively… in other words, quicker than normal acceleration and faster into turns for winter driving conditions.

I do not engage FSD in snowy weather, just as I would not use cruise control in snowy conditions. However a slippery spot on a bend and the car reacts as if I’ve done something wrong, rather than handling it itself with traction control.

I’ve gotten to the point that I don’t attempt to use FSD below ~35 degrees. Anyone else in colder climates have a similar experience? Seems like the programmers for FSD only plan for dry road conditions…
I live in a place that doesn't snow, and I use it >95% of miles I drive. It's not ready to drive in the snow or on ice yet. FSDbeta does take some learning, and then it becomes very predictable. Starting off in the middle of winter is gonna be tough; wait for a clearer day and road (I used to live in Rochester, MN, I know thats a big ask). For now use it on the interstate on non-covered in slush days to learn it where it does best.

Airplane analogy: I'm a pilot, and I understood FSD right away because I use an autopilot in a plane. It cruises perfectly (freeway), it does most climbs and descents okay (merging and exits). You have to watch it closely with lots of traffic and maneuvering (city streets). Autopilots don't land the plane or take you to the airport bar and buy you a drink. You are the pilot, autopilot is a machine with predictable limitations.

Couple words of advice:
1. It cannot sense another drivers intentions (yet), if there is anything strange going on, don't let the car guess. Taking over for a few seconds and get through the more unpredictable events makes for a much better experience. Airplanes are the same way.

2. If the lines are weird or missing, the construction cones are misplaced - and there are other cars... Again, don't let the car guess. When it clears up a little, give it another try.

3. Read the manual. Seriously, it's a quick read, it'll tell you a wealth of information.

4. I love it, I do >150 mile daily trips taking care of patients all over my city and I couldn't possibly do that safely without FSD, consistently. It is incredible, but it can't replace us (yet).

5. It will greatly improve safety when in the right conditions. A guy pulled out on the freeway without seeing me and FSD swerved around him gently before I could react. Another time a man cut me off and then hit the car in front of him. I went to reflexively slam on the brakes - the pedal was already down all the way. It reacts VERY fast to a variety of events that require faster-than-human reactions. Not everything yet...
 
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