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Washing Model S - Chemical Guys - Question

Hey forum I have a question; I have Black model S; using the chemical guys waterless solution, two towels and I have having these awful streaks on the front hood that I driving me nuts. I don't notice on anywhere else on the car.

I have the front Xpel wrapped (75% of the entire car is wrapped) the rest is Opticoat (25%)

Any tips, tricks, help you all can offer?

Thanks!
 

Patrick W

Active Member
Mar 17, 2015
1,500
922
SLC, UT
Just curious. And don't mean to cast funny looks at folks that are super careful about how they wash their cars. But I've been driving Teslas for a few years now and when the car's dirty it goes through a car wash that uses brushes that actually touch the car. Even the occasional paint chip doesn't bother me.

It's a special car. It's an incredible car. Best car I've ever owned. If I ever have to replace it it will be with another Tesla.

But it's still just a car.

Am I the only one who feels that way? :) :) :)
 

Krash

Data Technician
Moderator
Apr 18, 2017
2,335
2,586
Intermountain US
...it's still just a car...Am I the only one who feels that way?..
I always feel a little embarrassed to have my car be dirty. Maybe its because it is black and sooo many people comment on how nice the car is. And I grew up in a family of hand wash, detailing perfectionists.

I have compromised with cheap brushless drive through and am thinking of adding waterless spot cleanup for the inevitable streaks after driving away from the carwash.
 
Waterless is risky man. So much potential for scratches and swirls
Not if done properly. There are plenty of descriptions online of the proper way to do it, the essence of which is at least one separate, clean section of a deep-nap microfiber towel for each body panel, always dragged across the car in the same direction (so the the leading edge remains the same) so that potentially scratching particles are lifted up into the leading edge of the towel, away from the car before the rest of the nap performs the cleaning.
 

Bebop

Active Member
Jun 25, 2017
1,193
733
Midwest
My entire car is wrapped in XPEL Ultimate and I use the following to clean it. All done via hand. You spray this on like waterless cleaning products and wipe.

9E4CAB2E-A844-4136-9DC7-2A63F601F839.jpeg
 
Just curious. And don't mean to cast funny looks at folks that are super careful about how they wash their cars. But I've been driving Teslas for a few years now and when the car's dirty it goes through a car wash that uses brushes that actually touch the car. Even the occasional paint chip doesn't bother me.

It's a special car. It's an incredible car. Best car I've ever owned. If I ever have to replace it it will be with another Tesla.

But it's still just a car.

Am I the only one who feels that way? :) :) :)
Its just a ~$150,000 car - sure take it to a abrasive brush car wash and watch the paint get scrubbed to death. I or guys I have hired hand wash or use waterless detail in between washes.
 
Chemical Guys is mostly overpriced, overmarketed, average products. I used to use them, and now I don't... much better stuff out there. They sell some good things, but most of it's not worth buying.

Waterless washing is stupid. Don't do it. Use a low water option (<1 gallon per wash... buy distilled water at the store). Optimum No Rinse is great for this and works perfectly without scratching if you do it right with the Garry Dean method and about 5 quality large microfiber towels.

The Rag Company sells a variety of purpose built excellent microfiber towels. I use their high GSM edgeless towels for washing with ONR, their Dry Me a River towels, and glass towels.

Don't use vinegar to clean your microfiber... that sounds ridiculous. Chemical Guys sells microfiber detergent that works very well, and a gallon of it is about $30. Wash your microfiber only using a proper detergent like this, and only with other microfiber towels - never any other items.

If you're really worried about scratching, AMMO's FROTHE wash just came out and looks great. A bit expensive and maybe messier than ONR, but probably well worth it, and can wash extremely dirty vehicles without a prerinse (ONR needs a prerinsed vehicle if it's extremely dirty). I haven't had any problems with ONR though, so I'll keep using that until I run out.
 
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Agree with everything you said, until you contradicted yourself -- "Chemical Guys is mostly overpriced"..... then, "Chemical Guys sells microfiber detergent"...

Trust me - been washing cars for 40 years.. both professionally and for my own cars -- one teaspoon of vinegars cleans the crap off microfiber towels really well... a gallon jug from Costco costs ~$5... search online you will see many recommendations -- I know it works - give it try -- its definitely better than a $30 bottle of Chemical Guys microfiber detergent.

Let's agree they are mostly overpriced and their are better options..

Write Up: How To Wash Microfiber Towels

BOILING YOUR TOWELS:

Over time your microfiber may become contaminated past the point it can be completely cleaned using traditional methods. Typically this will present itself during use - drying towels will begin to feel less absorbent. Plush towels may lint slightly or smear products more than remove them. This is an indication that the fibers are 'full' either from residues deposited during use or things like fabric softener accidentally introduced during cleaning.


In any event, if your towels begin to loose their performance or just don't feel as good as they did new boiling is the solution, the last resort, to bring them back. NOTE: this process applies only to towels and microfiber without foam cores or backing. Never boil pads or applicators.

  • Fill a large cooking pot approximately 2/3rd full of water and bring to a boil
  • Add approximately 1-2oz of distilled white vinegar per gallon of water and stir
  • Place a few of the towels to be treated into the pot, maintaining a slow boil
  • Stir continuously with a large spoon, avoid letting the towels rest against the bottom or sides for too long
  • After about 60-90 seconds in the boil, remove the towels using tongs and rinse under cool water
  • Wash using the "Regular Cleaning" guidelines outlined earlier and they should be as good as new.
NOTE: Should boiling fail to bring absorbancy to a towel or the towel continues to lint then you are most likely dealing with a towel at the end of its lifespan. Retire the towel to less important tasks and replace with a new one for future use.
 

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