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weight distribution

Discussion in 'Cars and Transportation' started by TEG, May 26, 2009.

  1. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    With the Roadster's 0-60 capability they do well with extra weight on the driven wheels. If they had AWD then make the weight even, but since they are rear wheel drive it helps maintain traction to have more weight in the back.
    (At least from doing quick 0-60 runs without slipping the tires. From a slalom handling standpoint it would be better to have more even weight distribution).

    And back to Mini-E - worst case is to have weight dominance on the non driven wheels.
     
  2. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    Exactly, not to mention lower CG, remember the TopGear slalom video?
    Like the majority of vehicles built up until the 90's, front engine rear wheel drive.
     
  3. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    I guess some people like doing burnouts rather than 0-60 in 4s.

    Although some like Corvette put a transaxle in back to spread the weight around.
     
  4. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    Not to mention power slides and donuts :biggrin:
    In the older Corvettes with a conventional motor and trans combo the motor is far enough behind the front wheels to give good weight distribution. Most dragsters have the motor in front, weight transfer on takeoff gives them plenty of traction. I think as long as you have the weight behind the front wheels, on a rear drive vehicle, you'll get good traction. Certainly the Mini fails at this task but that's not it's intended purpose. However it can deliver some massive regen.
     
  5. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Huh? From what I have seen most dragsters try to put the weight of the motor on the rear wheels.
    ate%20race%20cars%20by%20viewing%20Don%20Garlits%27%20dragster.%20Photo%20by%20Murray%20Anderson.jpg
    Rice%20&%20Williams%20AA-Fuel%20Dragster,%20July%201967.%20Photo%20by%20Pete%20Garramone.jpg

    Plus the front tends to be so light that the wheels lift off and nearly all the weight ends up on the driven wheels.
    (bouncing off the wheelie bar in back)
    0404pon_07z+Spotts_Performance_428_Dragster+Right_Side_View.jpg
     
  6. Tdave

    Tdave Member

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    Two of those have the engine in front of the driver. Does that make them "in the front"? Still between the axles, so does that make them mid-engine? I don't know, and not sure it really matters, but just pointing that out.
     
  7. stopcrazypp

    stopcrazypp Well-Known Member

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    From what I understand mid-engine is just placing the motor in between the front and rear axle. There is no reference to the passenger compartment.

    The confusing point is the general definition of front engine has become any car with the engine in front of the passenger compartment. Strictly it should only apply to cars with the engine in front of the front axle, like how the term rear-engine is still used. Supposedly there is the term "front-mid" to describe a car with an engine in the front of the passenger compartment but still between the front and rear axles.

    On drag racing I agree with JRP3, usually the weight transfer from takeoff is enough for good traction, though I suppose more weight near the rear will make it even better. The problem is that with a front wheel drive car, the weight transfer is off the traction wheels, so a front bias is probably a necessity for good traction; a heavy rear bias just makes it worst.
     
  8. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    I guess it depends on the class of vehicle, but as has been pointed out all the motors are in front of the rear axle, not over or behind.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    #9 TEG, May 28, 2009
    Last edited: May 28, 2009
    Well I think all the quickest ones end up "standing up" on the rear wheels so the front wheels don't really matter much. They are just to point you before you "unleash the fury".

    Some of the "funny cars" have to resemble production cars so they end up with the engine mounted a little more forward than they would do if they didn't have those rules to follow.

    That so called Corvette funny car picture illustrates how they would make a cartoon interpretation of the Corvette shape to squish the cockpit back and stretch the hood so that they could mount the engine as far back as possible.
    FunnyCarDragster.jpg
    (notice they go so far as to cut a hole in the windshield so it can sit partially back inside the cockpit?)


    A stock Corvette has the engine much more forward, practically on top of the front wheels.:[​IMG]
     

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