Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

What do you do if you get a flat?

BlueWRXPride

Member
Oct 24, 2017
206
64
Syracuse
I've always been someone that believes everyone should be able to at least change a tire on their car. I realize that the M3 doesn't come with a spare, or runflats, or even a can of fix-a-flat. So what does Tesla expect you to do if you get a flat tire? I know that roadside assistance is included, but I assume that's only while you have a warranty, and even if I had that coverage, I'd much rather just change it myself in 10 minutes, rather than wait an hour or more for a truck to show up.

I suppose I can just keep a compressor in the car and hope I never get a catastrophic blowout, but I'm just surprised that it seems like the only option you'd have is to have the car towed for something as silly as a flat tire.
 

C141medic

Active Member
Apr 9, 2016
1,714
1,578
New Jersey
I've always been someone that believes everyone should be able to at least change a tire on their car. I realize that the M3 doesn't come with a spare, or runflats, or even a can of fix-a-flat. So what does Tesla expect you to do if you get a flat tire? I know that roadside assistance is included, but I assume that's only while you have a warranty, and even if I had that coverage, I'd much rather just change it myself in 10 minutes, rather than wait an hour or more for a truck to show up.

I suppose I can just keep a compressor in the car and hope I never get a catastrophic blowout, but I'm just surprised that it seems like the only option you'd have is to have the car towed for something as silly as a flat tire.
Model S/X/3 Tire Repair Kit
 

brkaus

Well-Known Member
Jul 8, 2014
8,137
6,703
Austin, TX
It’s pretty standard these days. Lots of weight in a spare that hardly gets used. I have a tire plug kit and am purchasing a portable compressor.

I had my first nail in my S a few weeks back. I was at home, so had a regular compressor. The plug has held fine for 1500 miles.

I personally wouldn’t do the slime thing. But if you do, get TPMS safe slime.

The one catastrophic blowout / sidewall failure I had in my BMW was the same day I discovered the valve stem on the spare had a catastrophic failure :(
 

BlueWRXPride

Member
Oct 24, 2017
206
64
Syracuse
Yeah, just seems like they should at least include a compressor and slime can. I know I can easily throw one in the frunk, but it's the principle of it! A flat tire shouldn't result in a tow truck. :)
 
  • Love
Reactions: jsmay311

TT97

Active Member
Aug 6, 2017
2,173
2,978
Los Angeles
It’s pretty standard these days. Lots of weight in a spare that hardly gets used. I have a tire plug kit and am purchasing a portable compressor.

I had my first nail in my S a few weeks back. I was at home, so had a regular compressor. The plug has held fine for 1500 miles.

I personally wouldn’t do the slime thing. But if you do, get TPMS safe slime.

The one catastrophic blowout / sidewall failure I had in my BMW was the same day I discovered the valve stem on the spare had a catastrophic failure :(

I am assuming the Model 3 doesn't have a jack? I have used a plug kit before but can't imagine using it without lifting the car as there is very little clearance to work.

Did you fix the tire on the S without lifting the car?

I would recommend carrying a TPMS safe slime and a compressor. There are plenty of options on Amazon much cheaper than the Tesla kit.

You could also buy run flat tires but they are expensive and have a rougher ride.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Icer

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
3,028
The Americas
Search this here fora for the following:

Tesla tire service jack pad adapter tools

In that vendor thread you'll find both the very helpful jack pad adapters, a floor jack recommendation that will fit in yer frunk, and very good vendor support including fast shipping and great communication.

In addition to jack pad adapters (set of 2) and 1/2 ton floor jacks (2) - see the in-thread recommendation as they're lightweight and smaller, I carry an air compressor, a plug kit, and various tools. Believe it or not, all of that takes up surprisingly less space than a full-size spare tire, and since the advent of the new microfrunks, there's no practical room for a full-size spare anyway.

None of the above will help you if you experience a blowout, and if you have a slow leak it's not difficult to find an America's/Discount Tire or similar en route to wherever it is you're headed. However, for all of the in-between scenarios, carrying a decent roadside kit is not a bad idea.

For bonus points, add a 3-day emergency kit (the one everyone is supposed to carry anyway) and a rechargeable fire extinguisher (you probably won't need it, but we've all seen an ICE on the side of the road with an engine fire at one time or another).
 

DR61

Member
Apr 14, 2016
561
628
Gold River, CA
What I am going to do:
Keep a tire pump/sealant kit and a patch kit in the trunk (already have one in current car). The tire pump (without sealant) may be good enough to get the car to a tire shop in case of a slow leak. I will use the sealant if necessary for a bad leak when I don't want to wait for roadside service, or take the time to try to patch the tire.

I am considering getting a temporary compact spare with correct 4.5" bolt circle and approximate diameter (26") of the stock tires, along with a compact jack, jack pad, and lug wrench. These would only go in the trunk when venturing into remote areas.

I already do the above for our current car (Mini) which also did not have a spare.
 

Tam

Well-Known Member
Nov 25, 2012
9,678
8,809
Visalia, CA
...change it myself...

I thought you have answered yourself already.

Tesla wants owners to call roadside assistance for flats. It's only good while under warranty and it'll be no longer free after that.

Runflats is an option but some people don't like a rougher ride and expensive cost.

Some early Model S owners just buy a spare tire, jack, lug wrench... and place them in the front frunk but newer frunk now is much smaller so you need to place it in the rear trunk.

My favorite 12V compressor is an automatic shut-off kind:
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Icer

buttershrimp

Click my signature to Go Mad Max Mode
Supporting Member
Jun 17, 2017
3,290
8,759
ATX
Search this here fora for the following:

Tesla tire service jack pad adapter tools

In that vendor thread you'll find both the very helpful jack pad adapters, a floor jack recommendation that will fit in yer frunk, and very good vendor support including fast shipping and great communication.

In addition to jack pad adapters (set of 2) and 1/2 ton floor jacks (2) - see the in-thread recommendation as they're lightweight and smaller, I carry an air compressor, a plug kit, and various tools. Believe it or not, all of that takes up surprisingly less space than a full-size spare tire, and since the advent of the new microfrunks, there's no practical room for a full-size spare anyway.

None of the above will help you if you experience a blowout, and if you have a slow leak it's not difficult to find an America's/Discount Tire or similar en route to wherever it is you're headed. However, for all of the in-between scenarios, carrying a decent roadside kit is not a bad idea.

For bonus points, add a 3-day emergency kit (the one everyone is supposed to carry anyway) and a rechargeable fire extinguisher (you probably won't need it, but we've all seen an ICE on the side of the road with an engine fire at one time or another).


Tao have you had a flat you've had to change on one of your adventures? What 3 day emergency kit do you use? I thought about turning a spare upside down, very curious about just carrying a spare tire no wheel, but I have no experience trying to mount a tire on a rim.

Tire plug saved me once. The idea of a side wall blowout scares me after I had tesla roadside refuse to pick me up in sweetwater. lucky for me, tractor supply store in sweet water taught me how to use a tire plug kit... I didn't even have to take the wheel off, just rolled forward until I found the leak, then put the impale the hole with the rasp and then put the plug in.... I actually messed up the valve stem inserting extra ooze.... but I probably didn't need it.... the plug held for a 2000 miles or so afterwards before I changed it..
 

brkaus

Well-Known Member
Jul 8, 2014
8,137
6,703
Austin, TX
Interesting that the tire repair kit Tesla sells indicates you have to replace the TPMS sensors. Wonder why they wouldn’t include “safe slime”?

The more i read about it, the more I think TPMS safe slime is a myth.

Did you fix the tire on the S without lifting the car?

Front tire, so I turned the wheel exposing the tread. Back would be harder, but doable.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top