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What if electric vehicles came first?

Oct 20, 2019
58
49
Fredericton
Great point, poor wording choice for a thread title lol. I know they came first I mean if they became the first prevalent forum of transportation first. The article hopefully does a better job explaining my thoughts lol.
 

640k

Member
Jul 15, 2019
929
693
Cincinnati
Hey everyone, I write a blog and wanted to share this one as I thought it was a fun/interesting topic. If it's against forum rules to share links to other blogs than go ahead and delete :)

https://www.chargedsociety.com/post/what-if-the-tables-were-turned

If this is allowed to stay up, I'd welcome everyone's comments.

Thanks for reading :)
i think your article misses the point entirely. 100 years ago, we were a different people, with different priorities. cars were not a necessity, pollution was rarely thought of, and the infrastructure didn't exist. many people of the time were perfectly happy with walking, taking the train or even riding a horse. we had bicycles, we lived in the city (when needed) and the streets were made for pedestrians.

the automobile changed history and the world, how we perceived these things, and the eventual availability of access, the sense of freedom, and the "pursuit" of a better life (not having to live in a dirty, grimy, crime-ridden city). quick and effective transportation was going to happen no matter what. availability of tech, income of the masses and word of mouth are what drove us (pun) to where we are today.

alternative to your point, what if we had made steam more efficient? water is seemingly (or at least was) a "never ending" supply. refueling would have been plain and simple. no stupid infrastructure, no awful pollutants. steam was the way of the future. the combustion engine came along as a natural progression of things. it was available tech, had a better power to weight ratio and was relatively inexpensive to product and maintain. everything else was just bolts, metal and a couple wheels. better yet, what if we had figured out a way to split hydrogen from water and created an early fuel cell? where would we be today?

electric motors have existed alongside the internal combustion engine for nearly as long. open up any electrical device from the turn of the century and you will see a grease-filled, odd environment with foreign-looking cables, huge metal contacts and lots of energy waste. i don't think BEVs are the permanent "solution" moving forward. I still believe BEVs are an interim technology, soon to be replaced with a different type of battery to power delivery system.

my follow up question to you would be this: would we have progressed as quickly with technology had petroleum not been the central motivational factor for progress. petroleum is in our rubber, plastics, fabrics, lubricants, etc., etc., i question what scientific and technological advancements we would have made had it not been such a central and pivotal point in history.
 
Oct 20, 2019
58
49
Fredericton
i think your article misses the point entirely. 100 years ago, we were a different people, with different priorities. cars were not a necessity, pollution was rarely thought of, and the infrastructure didn't exist. many people of the time were perfectly happy with walking, taking the train or even riding a horse. we had bicycles, we lived in the city (when needed) and the streets were made for pedestrians.

the automobile changed history and the world, how we perceived these things, and the eventual availability of access, the sense of freedom, and the "pursuit" of a better life (not having to live in a dirty, grimy, crime-ridden city). quick and effective transportation was going to happen no matter what. availability of tech, income of the masses and word of mouth are what drove us (pun) to where we are today.

alternative to your point, what if we had made steam more efficient? water is seemingly (or at least was) a "never ending" supply. refueling would have been plain and simple. no stupid infrastructure, no awful pollutants. steam was the way of the future. the combustion engine came along as a natural progression of things. it was available tech, had a better power to weight ratio and was relatively inexpensive to product and maintain. everything else was just bolts, metal and a couple wheels. better yet, what if we had figured out a way to split hydrogen from water and created an early fuel cell? where would we be today?

electric motors have existed alongside the internal combustion engine for nearly as long. open up any electrical device from the turn of the century and you will see a grease-filled, odd environment with foreign-looking cables, huge metal contacts and lots of energy waste. i don't think BEVs are the permanent "solution" moving forward. I still believe BEVs are an interim technology, soon to be replaced with a different type of battery to power delivery system.

my follow up question to you would be this: would we have progressed as quickly with technology had petroleum not been the central motivational factor for progress. petroleum is in our rubber, plastics, fabrics, lubricants, etc., etc., i question what scientific and technological advancements we would have made had it not been such a central and pivotal point in history.

Hi 640k, thanks for taking the time to read and to compose your feedback. Unlike some of my articles where I intended to have a bit more serious tone, the intent of this one was more comical. I am a car lover and will forever have a tremendous respect for the internal combustion engine and the important role it played in society. As our reliance on gasoline-powered cars fades, we still have a tremendous distance to go before we are even remotely close to being an oil-free civilization. I don't believe there was any other path to get to where we are today and that oil at the very least has been a necessary evil. The fact of the matter is that electric vehicles were not technologically close to being competitive with their gas competitors one hundred years ago. The intent of my article was not to suggest that it could have happened or should have happened, it's simply fun to think of what it would be like if electric cars were the first widespread and truly mainstream mode of transportation. As most of us will attest, now that we own BEVs, it is almost unimaginable to return back to a Gasoline vehicle for many of the reasons suggested in the blog. If all the stubborn gas vehicle owners could simply see gas vehicles from our point of view, I don't think the ICE internal combustion engine would have long left in this world, at least from a vehicle perspective.

I agree with your points on the BEV being a temporary solution and agree that I love the concept of hydrogen but it appears we are many years away from commercially manufacturing it efficiently enough for it to be viable.

It's an interesting jump from having no on read your writing to a couple of hundred people, this is a new experience for me and every article I learn something new. On this one, I've definitely learned that moving forward I need to do a better job being more decisive.

Cheers
 

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