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What is high mileage to you? Would you buy high mileage used?

What is a high mileage per year?


  • Total voters
    56
Hi all,

Just curious per year what people consider high mileage. I.e. car is 5 years old with 100k therefore 20k/year.

Also, please comment on what you may be willing to own, would you be willing tk buy a uses model 3 with high miles?

My example is; I am looking at a new M3P but some used ones are coming up with some light mods. And... generally buying built is cheaper than building so...
2019 M3P FSD, martian 20" rims, new tires, Front end PPF, 55k miles, unplugged suspension and sway bars. Would you own it for 8k less than a new base M3P?
 

kurtatx

Member
Supporting Member
Apr 19, 2015
182
139
Austin, TX
Hi all,

Just curious per year what people consider high mileage. I.e. car is 5 years old with 100k therefore 20k/year.

Also, please comment on what you may be willing to own, would you be willing tk buy a uses model 3 with high miles?

My example is; I am looking at a new M3P but some used ones are coming up with some light mods. And... generally buying built is cheaper than building so...
2019 M3P FSD, martian 20" rims, new tires, Front end PPF, 55k miles, unplugged suspension and sway bars. Would you own it for 8k less than a new base M3P?
Going by lease rate, I would say 12-15K is "normal" 15-20k is "normal-high", over 20 is high mileage.

That also tracks with warranties. 4 years 50 is "normal" and 12.5k per year.
 
To me, high mileage applies differently to a Tesla. Mechanically, sure, suspension components and body/glass, and potentially the interior will take a wear-n-tear beating on a 'high mileage' car.

Typical factors are city vs suburb short trip driving vs mostly highway (trips or commuter) miles; road quality in the area where the car was driven most, climate and winter use (given West New York); use type (weekend warrior, garage queen vs daily beater, etc).

Drivetrain-wise, its a very different story since 50, 100K or even 250K for Tesla motors and drivetrain cant compare to ICE equivalent. Doesnt matter much if those miles were racked up in 5 or 15 years.

Battery-wise, at 55K, unless the previous owner completely ignored all best-practice (and maybe even then), the array should have plenty of juice left with most of the adolescent era range loss already realized.

Suspension mods and wheels are a personal choice. If you like what the current/previous owner did and are willing to live with the positive and potential negative consequences, go for it! Regardless of spend, and implied quality these are in the value-loss category.

Asking price seems high, especially given current production retail pricing.
 

Phlier

Bluebird
Jun 12, 2019
2,208
4,135
Utah
Regardless of spend, and implied quality these are in the value-loss category.
Exactly.

Most dealers will give you exactly zero dollars for modifications, with a few exceptions. But even on those exceptions, they'll only give you pennies on the dollar for them.

It looks like this seller is looking to recover the entire cost(s) of his mods. If they are exactly the mods you had planned, then there may be some value there.

I think it would be worth looking up the Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds value on that exact car (noting especially to input the mileage, as that's pretty high mileage for a two year old car), and comparing the "private sale" price that KBB/Edmunds gives you to the price he's asking. Anything over the "private sale" price is the value he's expecting to get for the mods. Is this figure realistic? Would you be better off (dollars ahead) to find a similar used car and do the mods yourself?

Knowing the book value for "private sale" gives you a great starting point.

At first glance, I'd say this seller is pricing his mods way too optimistically.
 
You know, high mileage is a variable term. When reselling a car, 10K miles can be considered high mileage while 80K miles can be considered low mileage depending on the age of the car and how long it took to put those miles on it. Sites that estimate the value of a car will add or subtract value depending on the manufacture date as related to the mileage.
 
I have had difficulty pricing teslas on the third party site, even when the VIN is sent to tesla it seems like they are in the 30k-32k range. Just seems way off. Thats saying it dropped over 55% of its value in 55k miles

Not sure if tesla started to value FSD cost at trade in yet. Doesnt seem like it.
 

dmurphy

Active Member
Supporting Member
Mods are generally valueless on the used market. Sorry for those who paid $5k to PPF their cars, it just doesn’t hold value at resale.

That said, I’d consider a Tesla with higher mileage than I would a gas engined car. It’s not like there are oil changes to skip or gears to grind or any real maintenance that gets missed.
 

dmurphy

Active Member
Supporting Member
I guess i should have made the poll "what price would you buy the follow..." as i seem tl be looking for self justification on buying a higher mileage tesla...
Also should have been "how much have you spent out of pocket on your maintenance and how many miles total.."
I’m only 27k miles in, but so far my maintenance bill has been $2.99 for the entire gallon of washer fluid.
 
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One other thing to consider is the warranty. At 55k miles, the warranty coverage is gone for everything except the powertrain. So, that will impact the value of the car as well.
Teslas don't have a "powertrain" warranty. The only thing remaining would be the drive unit and battery pack warranty (Vehicle Warranty).

Many people here at TMC have tried to talk about a "drivetrain" or "powertrain" warranty esp. in the context of trying to get certain things covered under warranty like half-shafts. Well, half-shafts aren't part of the drive unit nor battery pack, so once the basic warranty is gone, that's it.
 

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