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What Is It Like to Work at Tesla Motors?

Vger

Active Member
Apr 10, 2009
1,781
209
Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Interesting perspective. Nice to hear that they are paying the line workers well.

I personally think the job Mr. Passin did in starting up the factory was an incredible feat, and well worthy of praise.

If I wore a younger man's shoes, I'd love to be part of this adventure.
 

Zzzz...

Member
Aug 19, 2012
867
0
East Asia/Canada
Interesting article. A good way to get somebody to join Tesla is to give them a test drive in one.

What Is It Like to Work at Tesla Motors?

Sorry, but there is a original article, so why read reworded one, provided that person who reworded original did not bothered to preserve facts and largely twisted statements. Ok, he/she managed to give a link to source info, kudos. Here is the link or you could click it in OP article: http://www.thestreet.com/story/12763694/1/heres-what-its-like-to-work-or-elon-musk.html
 

igotzzoom

Active Member
May 26, 2013
1,217
585
Mission Viejo, CA
I think sometimes you need to detach the brand image of the product from the reality of actually working there. I applied for a job with Apple Computer. I know several people that have worked there in the recent past. I have read plenty of horror stories of grueling working conditions on blogs in terms of long hours, domineering bosses, and a suffocating culture of secrecy. None of my contacts contradicted this perception, but did add some perspective to the conversation.

I have huge admiration for Tesla as a company and Elon Musk as an individual, but I also know that at this point in time, a job at Tesla would likely mean long hours, seemingly unreasonable demands, and an unwavering commitment to the "mission." I'm not saying I'd personally be opposed to taking such a job, but when you're in a committed relationship, sometimes your S.O. doesn't always share the same level of passion, which can lead to problems. No disrespect to Mr. Musk or the company. Just sayin'.
 

bonnie

I play a nice person on twitter.
Feb 6, 2011
16,427
9,740
Columbia River Gorge
I think sometimes you need to detach the brand image of the product from the reality of actually working there. I applied for a job with Apple Computer. I know several people that have worked there in the recent past. I have read plenty of horror stories of grueling working conditions on blogs in terms of long hours, domineering bosses, and a suffocating culture of secrecy. None of my contacts contradicted this perception, but did add some perspective to the conversation.

I have huge admiration for Tesla as a company and Elon Musk as an individual, but I also know that at this point in time, a job at Tesla would likely mean long hours, seemingly unreasonable demands, and an unwavering commitment to the "mission." I'm not saying I'd personally be opposed to taking such a job, but when you're in a committed relationship, sometimes your S.O. doesn't always share the same level of passion, which can lead to problems. No disrespect to Mr. Musk or the company. Just sayin'.

One of the reasons I invested in Tesla was because of the fact that I saw employees at every level who share Elon's vision, want to be part of where Tesla is going, are proud to be part of the team, and put in long hours to get there. I've seen plenty of companies where the CEO wanted to make that happen - I've never before actually observed it. I personally know a number of Tesla employees at all different levels. Some are still there and have risen many levels within the company (happens with a quickly growing company), some are senior level executives, some have left for personal reasons and only have good things to say.

I also know people who have interviewed there and Tesla doesn't hide the fact that working there will require dedication. You have to want to be part of this disruptive revolution. As vger said, if I were at a different point in my career, I'd do it in a heartbeat. It's an exciting company and an exciting time. Instead I support from the sidelines. It's a story that I'm proud to be able to tell from pre-factory days.
 

igotzzoom

Active Member
May 26, 2013
1,217
585
Mission Viejo, CA
Bonnie, I absolutely agree. I am very excited at what Tesla is doing, and where the company is going. My wife looks at EVs in general and Tesla in particular, and says "that's nice" in a disinterested way. If I were suddenly spending 100+ hours at work, I don't think she'd share the same level of enthusiasm. A job like that isn't for everyone, but for those that find satisfaction in it, I'm sure it's a singularly rewarding experience.
 

gg_got_a_tesla

Model S: VIN 65513, Model 3: VIN 1913
Jan 29, 2010
6,533
769
Redwood Shores, CA
Echo @igotzzoom's thoughts. For a while, I was toying with the idea of working there; I even spoke at length with a friend of a friend there (in the battery tech division) and then talked to a hiring manager in the budding auto-pilot program.

Things fizzled out at that point but, looking back, it was the work-life balance that I realized that I'd have definitely lost out on. I'd have gone backwards years in my career and compensation too. This view was reinforced by what my wife at Salesforce.com heard from several female Tesla employees at a recent "Girl Geeks Dinner".

Have heard from other reliable sources too about how dysfunctional and neurotic the place can apparently be. But, that's the nature of such a pathbreaking startup, I guess.

Working at Tesla would pretty much make you a rock star in the eyes of your friends but, there'd be a lot of sacrifices to make. I'd rather earn my money elsewhere and pour that into buying more Tesla products ;)
 

Red Sage

The Cybernetic Samurai
Jul 6, 2014
3,033
2,121
Los Angeles CA
I rather wish I had thought to apply at Tesla Motors eight or nine years ago... The biggest problem about having a job you love is that you tend to forget there are other things in life you love just as much. Still not sure if I want to risk burning the candle on both ends, in the middle, around the sides, any longer. The last place I worked at may have burned me out for that sort of thing.

I spent far too many years working at a place I should have left over the past decade. I worked hard there too, but it was the wrong kind of working hard... That place prided itself on hiring people who may have had success elsewhere, but then wanted to teach them to do things 'their way'... It was about a year-and-a-half before I realized the job was hard because they had a bunch of archaic policies & procedures that forced me to do the work in the exact wrong way because it made the old timers comfortable.

It was as if they would take someone they knew could win a marathon, but they wouldn't put them in the race. Instead, they would put them on a treadmill. Sure, they could still run really, really fast... but they never got anywhere. I had to get off the treadmill, but I ended up falling off of it instead. ;-)
 

sbronle1

Member
Apr 23, 2014
59
0
Tampa, Fla
Very interesting rhetoric. Tesla is kind of the company that is probably breaking some molds. At 56 with two grown Millennial children I have witnessed some real cultural differences in work ethics and life goals. Both of my adult children have college educations and decent lives before them. Expectations have changed, no doubt. Perhaps Tesla is reviving that desire to work harder and reap the rewards. Is there something wrong with that concept or am I just old fashioned? In reality I bought this car because of my pride in seeing, for once in 100 years, an American company getting ahead and I mean really getting ahead by more than ten years of the stagnant car industry. If the Tesla workers don't want to push the envelope they probably don't belong. In my practice, I have six dedicated employees; none of which have been with us for less than 12 years. They work their asses off and get paid so well they would never leave.They are happy and never call in sick. My local newspaper had a great article this last weekend on the hiring of US Veterans by Tesla. Their reason is that these veterans come well trained and work cohesively in teams. Gee, that seems like a good idea. NO doubt there are many important things in life than work, but show me a person that loves their job and I will show you a person that has found happiness and will live longer. Balance is clearly the key but if you hate your wife or your job you will need to migrate, adapt, or die.
 

StephenM

Active Member
Dec 23, 2012
1,192
93
Very interesting rhetoric. Tesla is kind of the company that is probably breaking some molds. At 56 with two grown Millennial children I have witnessed some real cultural differences in work ethics and life goals. Both of my adult children have college educations and decent lives before them. Expectations have changed, no doubt. Perhaps Tesla is reviving that desire to work harder and reap the rewards. Is there something wrong with that concept or am I just old fashioned? In reality I bought this car because of my pride in seeing, for once in 100 years, an American company getting ahead and I mean really getting ahead by more than ten years of the stagnant car industry. If the Tesla workers don't want to push the envelope they probably don't belong. In my practice, I have six dedicated employees; none of which have been with us for less than 12 years. They work their asses off and get paid so well they would never leave.They are happy and never call in sick. My local newspaper had a great article this last weekend on the hiring of US Veterans by Tesla. Their reason is that these veterans come well trained and work cohesively in teams. Gee, that seems like a good idea. NO doubt there are many important things in life than work, but show me a person that loves their job and I will show you a person that has found happiness and will live longer. Balance is clearly the key but if you hate your wife or your job you will need to migrate, adapt, or die.

Good points. I would gladly take a pay cut (20%-30%?) to work for Tesla. I don't hate my job, but I would like to LOVE it and I'm pretty sure I would be passionate about Tesla since I believe in it so much. Too bad my background is in luxury retail.
 

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