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What is the maximum AC (not DC Supercharger) charging rate for the internal charger on a Plaid?

I found here, that the internal AC charger on the Plaid is rated at 16.5KW. Backing that out to a typical 220V home circuit (like an electric range or dryer), 16,500W / 220V = 75 Amps.

So if I bought the 14-50 adapter for the Mobile Connector, and supply it with a 50A breaker, will I charge at 50A at 220V = 11KW?

I think I read on the Tesla site that the Mobile Connector will not go above 32 Amps, regardless of a 14-50 plug with a 50A supply circuit.

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Big Earl

bnkwupt
Supporting Member
Jul 12, 2017
7,863
15,786
La Conner, WA
I found here, that the internal AC charger on the Plaid is rated at 16.5KW. Backing that out to a typical 220V home circuit (like an electric range or dryer), 16,500W / 220V = 75 Amps.

So if I bought the 14-50 adapter for the Mobile Connector, and supply it with a 50A breaker, will I charge at 50A at 220V = 11KW?

I think I read on the Tesla site that the Mobile Connector will not go above 32 Amps, regardless of a 14-50 plug with a 50A supply circuit.

View attachment 780905

The link you posted describes 3 phase charging, which we don’t have in the US. In the US, the Plaid charges at 48 amps max, which on 240 volts will be 11.5 kW.

The Tesla Mobile Connector has a 32 amp limit. The car will charge at 32 amps on a NEMA 14-50 receptacle.
 
...3 phase charging...

No, using two poles is still considered single phase, not three phase. The two poles are across a single phase of a 3 phase system. 240V across each phase. The neutral wire taps the "center" of the a single phase of 240V and pins it to zero volts. So if you go from one pole to neutral, you get 120. If you go from one pole to the other (skipping the neutral) you get 240V. But it is still only using a single phase.
 

ucmndd

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2016
9,424
18,305
California
You missed my point. US cars are not equipped with 3 phase charging. European cars are. The link you posted says 16.5 kW for 3 phase charging, which is not applicable to US cars. US cars charge at 11.5 kW.

I don’t think it’s even a single vs 3 phase thing. I just think that random third party website is plain wrong.

The Plaid’s power conversion system has three internal 16 amp boards for a total of 48 amps, 11.5kw at 240v.

End of story, single phase or 3 phase.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,560
11,109
Boise, ID
So if I bought the 14-50 adapter for the Mobile Connector, and supply it with a 50A breaker, will I charge at 50A at 220V = 11KW?
It's being addressed in separate pieces by different responses, but maybe I can help summarize. There are three pieces of equipment to this, which can each have its own capability limitation. And it will have to go by the lowest common denominator, where the lowest limitation wins.

1. External circuit rating. That will have some amp limit. And you are only supposed to use 80% of that rating. The charging equipment you use on the circuit should enforce that 80% limit for you so you won't have to remember or manually adjust anything.
2. The external charging equipment. This is called an EVSE, Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment. The charging cable or wall connector are examples of these. The mobile charging cable can only pass through 32A. Other devices, like the wall connector, can pass through more. Tesla's wall connector can do 48A.
3. The onboard charger inside the car. On the SR and SR+ Model 3 and Y, those are smaller battery, and Tesla decided to use smaller chargers in those, so they can only handle up to 32A. The long range cars have a 48A charger.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,560
11,109
Boise, ID
Ah, got it, thanks. So the onboard charger's maximum charge rate is 11.5 kW. Not limited by anything else.
Yes, the onboard charger can do up to 11.5 kW in all the current cars for the last few years, but as I described above, depending on what it's used with, it could be further limited by other things. If you are using a 20A circuit or using a low power charging cord, that could have other lower limits.
 

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