Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • The final cut of the 8th episode of the Tesla Motors Club Podcast, featuring Balazs Biro, of the prominent Hungarian EV channel Villanyautósok, is now available. You can watch it now on YouTube or listen to it on all major podcast networks.

What is your ABRP workflow for long trips?

I'm planning a ~400 mile drive soon. Obviously a multi-charge trip, and the second half of it covers some roads with big elevation changes and limited Superchargers. Given that, I'd prefer to use ABRP for accuracy rather than the Tesla Nav. But I do want Nav running to precondition the batteries and simply because it is much easier to follow than phone-based directions.

What's the best way to handle routing for the trip? I'm not aware of a way to program a multi-stop trip in to Nav. So are people just inputting ABRP's stops into Nav one at a time, and keeping the app running on a phone in the background?
 
The built-in Nav does consider elevation changes. Honestly, I've found that the built-in Nav works just fine. I've done about 3000 miles of road tripping on a 2016 Model S and a 2018 Model 3, through Colorado, Utah, Nevada, California, Arizona, Kansas, and Missouri. The only time the built-in NAV was too optimistic was driving across Kansas at sub-freezing temps. I think using ABRP during the actual trip is more trouble than its worth (I use it for general planning while not in the car). Just try to get the built in Nav to say you'll arrive with ~20% charge remaining. Anything lower is risky.
 
The built-in Nav does consider elevation changes. Honestly, I've found that the built-in Nav works just fine. I've done about 3000 miles of road tripping on a 2016 Model S and a 2018 Model 3, through Colorado, Utah, Nevada, California, Arizona, Kansas, and Missouri. The only time the built-in NAV was too optimistic was driving across Kansas at sub-freezing temps. I think using ABRP during the actual trip is more trouble than its worth (I use it for general planning while not in the car). Just try to get the built in Nav to say you'll arrive with ~20% charge remaining. Anything lower is risky.

I did test the elevation bit this weekend on a 45 mile drive with ~5,000 ft gain at mostly highway speed. The Nav actually overcalculated consumption by almost 8% at the start (it corrected during the course of the drive), but wound up being about 3% too optimistic for the round trip. Not bad but I am a bit worried about extrapolating that error over a longer drive where there is 100+ miles between chargers.

Also, I guess I shouldn't be too surprised but that elevation gain was brutal on range. 40% of total battery for 45 miles of driving.
 
The built-in Nav does consider elevation changes. Honestly, I've found that the built-in Nav works just fine.
Coming from Tahoe to San Francisco (Daly City actually), even though the 8 Gbyte eMMC problem was wreaking havoc and caused the touch screen to crash twice, I was impressed by this.

It took the NAV 20 minutes to conclude that I would NOT need to charge enroute due to regenerative braking and the drop in elevation. I mentally calculated the difference between distance to destination and the range left on the battery. I started from Lake Tahoe in the hole and then slowly the two numbers converged and then finally range in the battery exceeded the remaining distance. Despite all the hills in Daly City, dropped off our passenger just fine and had a 20 mile cushion to get to the nearest super charger less than 5 miles away.

With MCU2 this would have been less traumatic but I appreciated not having to spend a half hour extra to charge.
 
I used to overplan road trips until I got comfortable with the built in nav. For long trips thru unfamiliar routes I might look at abrp/plugshare to see spacing between superchargers or hotels with destination chargers. Or to check to make sure superchargers are not slow urban chargers. But now I’m pretty comfortable just charging up to a 20% buffer and keeping my eye on the estimated SOC at next charger. If it drops down to 10% (usually because I’m driving too fast) then I start slowing down incrementally until it stops dropping. Give yourself even more of a buffer in freezing temps.

The nav computer is also pretty good w elevation changes. On one uphill trip I had seemingly plenty of miles to get skip a supercharger, but the moment I passed it, I was sternly warned that I couldn’t make it to the next SC AND I needed to uturn and charge up. Was grateful.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jpfive
The Tesla nav will not properly handle the temperature, wind and the additional weight in the car, if you have any. Those are things that ABRP can do, provided you configure it properly. I've seen it be overly optimistic in many cases, especially in the colder and/or more windy periods.
I personally do a general trip planning with ABRP before I leave home, so I have a sense of what's going to happen. I then use the TEsla nav to go to my next destination, which is normally a supercharger. Once I'm charging, if I changed my plan while driving, I might launch ABRP again and do a quick plan of the remaining segment. OTherwise, I use the Tesla nav to the next stop. I just make sure I leave the buffer around 15-20% before I unplug since I know it's overly optimistic.
 

Big Earl

bnkwupt
Supporting Member
Jul 12, 2017
6,839
13,397
Springfield, VA
So I tested the Tesla Nav route for the trip. It has me going as low as 6% battery for some stops--way lower than I'm comfortable with. Any way to configure minimum battery level like in ABRP?
No way to adjust it. Just manually set the next closest supercharger as your destination or slow down a little.
 
  • Like
Reactions: drdumont

MorrisonHiker

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Mar 8, 2015
10,546
10,569
Colorado
So I tested the Tesla Nav route for the trip. It has me going as low as 6% battery for some stops--way lower than I'm comfortable with. Any way to configure minimum battery level like in ABRP?
When Tesla Nav tells you that you have enough, you can just continue to charge. If it has you arriving with only 6%, just stay longer and it will show you arriving with 7%, 8%, 9%, etc. As long as you continue to charge, it will update the expected arrival SoC.
 
When Tesla Nav tells you that you have enough, you can just continue to charge. If it has you arriving with only 6%, just stay longer and it will show you arriving with 7%, 8%, 9%, etc. As long as you continue to charge, it will update the expected arrival SoC.
That is how I have done it. Only time I differ from this is when it is really cold out (with like a 20 degree difference between where I am and where I will be going; that bit me one time and luckily I could route to a supercharger out of the way but it gave me enough to get home). Planning on the Route 66 and will charge to a 20% arrival projection so if we want to drive off the beaten path, we'll have the range to do it. Will be hitting 50K miles in our Model 3 AWD on this upcoming trip. Love my car!
 

jpfive

Member
Supporting Member
Oct 31, 2019
570
548
Pensacola, FL
The built-in Nav does consider elevation changes. Honestly, I've found that the built-in Nav works just fine. I've done about 3000 miles of road tripping on a 2016 Model S and a 2018 Model 3, through Colorado, Utah, Nevada, California, Arizona, Kansas, and Missouri. The only time the built-in NAV was too optimistic was driving across Kansas at sub-freezing temps. I think using ABRP during the actual trip is more trouble than its worth (I use it for general planning while not in the car). Just try to get the built in Nav to say you'll arrive with ~20% charge remaining. Anything lower is risky.

What Meros said.
 
I use ABRP before the trip to get a feel for how it will go. It's especially important when I drive in areas on the fringe of Supercharger coverage. Doing so a few times, and also replanning past trips, helped me understand what the difference is between the car and ABRP in terms of estimate, for example in the cold or because I go faster than the speed limit, when I have extra weight etc. Now that I know for any given segment the car is 5-7% more optimistic (than ABRP and reality, and YMMV), I just let the car charge a bit more before I leave. I use the car GPS one leg at a time.
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,281
5,739
Maryland
For those who don’t read the stats and metrics from your Tesla battery through a 3rd party wiring harness, what do you put as your battery degradation into ABRP?

I think default is 5%, but would you change it to 0% if you just bought the car? And every 3,000 miles add a percent until you get to 10% estimated degradation?
To see the total range the Model Y's battery management system is estimating is available you can use the Tesla app.

1) If you normally display the battery % state of charge on the main screen in the Model Y go to Display screen and scroll down to the Battery display and change this to Range.

2) Plug in the Model Y and start charging.

3) Using the Tesla app on your phone go to the Charging settings. Adjust the charging limit slider control, move this all the way to the right. The Tesla app will display the maximum estimated range. Note the maximum estimated range. Subtract the maximum estimated range value from 326 miles (The current estimated EPA combined City/Highway range for the Long Range Tesla Model Y) or else use 303 miles if the vehicle is the Performance Model Y. Divide this value by the EPA number and multiply by 100 to get the percentage of range less than the EPA estimate.

Example: The Tesla app shows an estimated range of 274 miles when fully charged.

326 - 274 = 52 miles;

52 / 326 X 100 = 16%

Note: this does not necessarily mean that the Model Y's battery has lost 16% of the capacity when new, only that the Tesla's battery management system estimate of the range is 16%. less than the EPA estimate. This could be due in part to needing to re-calibrate the Tesla vehicle's battery management system. To re-calibrate the battery you would need to charge the Tesla's battery pack above 95% and then deplete the battery charge to around 20% before charging. Repeat this for at least two additional charge and discharge cycles over the coming days. This should provide a more accurate estimate of the capacity of the battery and the range. Also, if you leave Sentry mode active all of the time, including when parked at your home location, the Tesla vehicle will not be able to enter sleep mode or deep sleep mode. Turn off Sentry mode when the Tesla vehicle is parked at your home location. When the Tesla vehicle enters sleep mode the high voltage battery is disconnected from the vehicle. This enables the battery management system to measure the open cell voltage (OCV) of the cells in the battery pack. The battery management system needs to periodically measure the OCV of the cells within the battery pack to be able to accurately estimate the capacity of the battery pack. I recall reading that the process of measuring the OCV can take several hours.

4) Lower the maximum charging limit to your usual setting and finish charging or else stop charging.

5) On the Display settings change the battery display from range back to % state of charge if that is your usual display preference.
 
Last edited:

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top