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What is your alternative to spending $1500+ on the Wall Connector and a dedicated 240v line?

What is your home charging solution?

  • Bit the bullet, had the Tesla Wall Connector installed by a pro

    Votes: 34 29.8%
  • Installed Tesla Wall Connector myself, adding a new circuit

    Votes: 21 18.4%
  • Was lucky to have a dryer outlet and plugged the Wall Connector into it

    Votes: 7 6.1%
  • Bought an extra UMC, plugged it into a 115v outlet and called it a charging station

    Votes: 2 1.8%
  • Take my provided UMC every night out of the f/trunk and plug into a 115v outlet

    Votes: 7 6.1%
  • Never have to charge at home, I am that lucky

    Votes: 2 1.8%
  • Other

    Votes: 41 36.0%

  • Total voters
    114
Yeah, it seems you left out the most common choice for whatever reason, as shown in the largest number of votes out of 7 choices being "Other".
4 years with mine now, and I also leave my UMC permanently plugged into the 14-50 outlet in the garage.
Only because I though most people would carry their UMC with them. But that's only if there is charging provided at work, which seems to be a minority.
 

mspohr

Well-Known Member
Jul 27, 2014
12,068
16,135
California
$245 for an electrician to install a 14-50 outlet and I leave the UMC plugged into it.
In my case though I had the wiring all in place for it.

The UMC will do you almost no good out and about.
Almost all public chargers are J1772. Bring your J1772 adapter and you are good to go.
I've found RV parks handy for charging out in the boondocks. The UMC with the 14-50 plug comes in handy here. I always take it with me on trips. Also, in a pinch, most hotel A/C units will give 16 amps at 240 volts. I have an adapter for this.
(At home, I've installed a dedicated HPWC.)
 
Only because I though most people would carry their UMC with them. But that's only if there is charging provided at work, which seems to be a minority.

Yeah, but once again, the typical 'charging provided at work' doesn't need the UMC, just the J1772 adapter that plugs into the cars charge port. I also only put the UMC in the car when taking a long trip, just in case. Have traveled from San Diego to Atlanta twice, just got back from Jackson Hole, been to Santa Fe and back, and still have never needed the UMC. Have only used the J1772 a couple of times. Got a 14-50 plug and 50amp breaker installed professionally for <$500. Charges the car (S75) to 80-90% in less than 6 hours. Also have a 7kW solar array on the roof that's paid for itself in less than 8 years. No electric bills during that time but may have a small one once the model 3 arrives.
 
Some tips I’ve read when researching charging specifics:
1. Try to keep your average state of charge (SOC) around 50% for a given day. 60-40, 70-30, etc. (TEDx)
2. Charge so your battery reaches the desired SOC shortly before driving for best performance. This helps even more in cold climates. (Manual)
3. Avoid 100% and 0% if possible for longest battery life.
4. Charging to above 94% every six months will help keep cells balanced. (TMC)
Thanks for your helpful reply!

Aside from this post, is there a Wiki/FAQ that has the tribal knowledge organized in this manner? Maybe there is a 5, a 6 and a 7 that you have not yet found or forgot to mention.
 
Yeah, but once again, the typical 'charging provided at work' doesn't need the UMC, just the J1772
Disagree, even if based on a sample size of one. We have six conveniently located 115v outlets, with every EV owner bringing their own EVSE.

I am starting to think I will buy a second UMC ($300 vs $500 for HPWC) and will plug it into an existing 115v outlet while pricing a NEMA 14-50 install, which is beginning to look more and more like a $500 job.

One forward-thinking electrician offered to install a new breaker and hook up a super-duper extension cord to it terminating with a NEMA 14-50, all within code. Says it's a popular option with people who need flexible and infrequent additional power supply such as for entertaining. Says when not in use, kill the breaker and coil up the cord on the ground in the side yard, under the panel.

Aside from obviously costing less (1 hr labor + cost of cord, which he promised to price for me), it solves two dilemmas. Outside vs inside wiring? Neither. And inside or outside of garage hookup. I have not yet figured out which I prefer and which I will be allowed to do, and whether my situation will change as to how many and what kind of cars I will have, how cluttered the garage will get and which side I will be parking on. The extension cord takes all these variables out of the equation. Leaving just two questions to ponder:

Will wife approve a loose cord running across front steps from side yard to garage overnight, and will I hate having to not just constantly replug, but also wind up the cord when not in use. Something about this prospect brings the coolness factor of owning a Tesla down by about 60%.

But hey, when I (or some of you) said there are many options, wasn't that the truth?
 
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Zaxxon

Active Member
Supporting Member
Dec 11, 2012
4,716
22,286
Colorado
J1772 is definitely the 'normal' charge at work option over 120V by a wide margin, for several reasons: charge power, cable management/cleanliness, ease of managing accounts/payments if needed, and no BYOEVSE.

As for my garage... I've got a JuiceBox Pro 40, which is a connected 40A J1772 EVSE. It charges my PHEV and my Leaf, and will soon (!) charge my Model 3. The extent of my new investment for the Model 3 is an extra J1772 adapter so that I can leave one in the car and one with the JuiceBox. UMC will remain in the car, as well.

If I didn't already have the Juicebox I might have stuck with the UMC and 14-50 outlet. But since I have it, I'll charge at 40A through the JuiceBox rather than 32A through the UMC. I like the data that the JuiceBox gives me, too.
 
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abasile

TSLA shareholder
Supporting Member
One forward-thinking electrician offered to install a new breaker and hook up a super-duper extension cord to it terminating with a NEMA 14-50, all within code. Says it's a popular option with people who need flexible and infrequent additional power supply such as for entertaining. Says when not in use, kill the breaker and coil up the cord on the ground in the side yard, under the panel.

Aside from obviously costing less (1 hr labor + cost of cord, which he promised to price for me), it solves two dilemmas. Outside vs inside wiring? Neither. And inside or outside of garage hookup. I have not yet figured out which I prefer and which I will be allowed to do, and whether my situation will change as to how many and what kind of cars I will have, how cluttered the garage will get and which side I will be parking on. The extension cord takes all these variables out of the equation. Leaving just two questions to ponder:

Will wife approve a loose cord running across front steps from side yard to garage overnight, and will I hate having to not just constantly replug, but also wind up the cord when not in use. Something about this prospect brings the coolness factor of owning a Tesla down by about 60%.
That sounds like a real pain. I think I'd try to avoid investing in anything that's not going to be semi-permanent, and any long term solution that involves daily adapter and cord shuffling would be sub-par for sure. In your situation, I think I'd just charge at 120V until a preferred, more permanent setup can be decided upon. Then put in a Tesla Wall Connector.

For daily use, our family really prefers the Wall Connector over the J-1772 station that we used for the first 1.5 years of Tesla ownership. It's really nice to not have to fuss with the J-1772 adapter all the time. It's not that big a deal, but little things like this add up over time.

Regarding installation costs, I'd shop around. Both of our charging stations (J-1772 and Tesla) were installed by local people for no more than a few hundred dollars each. I familiarized myself with the instructions and paid close attention since they were experienced in electrical work but not with charging stations in particular. For instance, with the Tesla Wall Connector, I was prepared with the location in the manual that explains the DIP settings for operation at up to 48 amps, and I knew to ask for a 60 amp circuit. That said, my participation wasn't truly needed, as there's nothing super fancy about installing a Wall Connector as opposed to, say, a stove circuit.
 
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My office installed two Clipper Creek 40A EVSEs, so I use those for virtually all my EV charging.

When I get the Tesla, I'll carry around a J1772 adapter but almost certainly not carry a portable EVSE of my own.

A medium-term project is to get my condo association to let me install a DryerBuddy system to share the power from the laundry room when it's not in use.
 

ratsbew

Active Member
Mar 3, 2012
1,296
1,054
O'Fallon, IL
I'm having a singe 14-50 installed in the middle of the garage. I'll pull one car in forward and back the other in so that both charger ports are in the "aisle way" of the garage and the single UMC can reach both cars. I'd love to have dual HPWC installed, but the runs would be pretty far and I probably won't be in my house 4 years from now so it isn't worth it.
 
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I bought a new HPWC off of eBay with 20% coupon = $420. I called around and got quotes of $2,200 - $2,350 from 3 different electricians for about 95ft wiring installation. Too much!

I bought 100ft of 4 guage romex wire, circuit breaker, etc. for about $500 from an electrical supply store. I ran the wire myself (damn the 4 guage romex is heavy!). An electrician will come and hook it up to the panel for about $100 this week.

So it would cost me about $1,000 all in for the HPWC system for me.
 
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I bought a new HPWC off of eBay with 20% coupon = $420. I called around and got quotes of $2,200 - $2,350 from 3 different electricians for about 95ft wiring installation. Too much!

I bought 100ft of 4 guage romex wire, circuit breaker, etc. for about $500 from an electrical supply store. I ran the wire myself (damn the 4 guage romex is heavy!). An electrician will come and hook it up to the panel for about $100 this week.

So it would cost me about $1,000 all in for the HPWC system for me.
If you were able to connect the HPWC, why can't you trip the main breaker and connect to the panel? That part is much easier to do.
 
Where are you getting 10 cents? On a separate EV meter maybe, but he is on the same meter. His generous household usage without the car puts him in the highest price tier at 45 cents if he were to charge the car at home.
The answer is to get off tiered rates.

When I changed from SCE tiered to TOU-A rates, my bill worked out to about $25 less per year for normal usage other than charging Blue Max. The big payoff was charging at super-off-peak rates between 10pm and 8am at $0.125/kWh.

SCE will run comparisons for your friend for a few representative weeks (a summer week, a winter, spring, etc.) during the past year to tell him what his bill would have been under TOU-A versus tiered rates, so he can know in advance whether TOU would be beneficial.
 
I continue to be confused about people saying that an HPWC should be used because it is a PITA to take the UMC out of the car and plug it in each time. This is said quite often, apparently with the assumption that a *second* UMC can't be purchased. For a significant percentage less money than the HPWC, certainly anybody can buy a second UMC to use as the "stay-at-home" unit. It can simply be plugged in and left at home, even if you wish to keep the original one in the car for emergencies. If you have a 14-50 handy, in the garage, GREAT. If not, one can be added, and no other "install" is needed... provided the owner is satisfied with 30A charging.

Now, all that said... I've fondled a couple of the new UMC's in my time, but failed to notice if they include any way to mount the unit on the wall. Keyhole slot? Anything? That would sure be handy. As with so many others here, my plan is to use one of my three (!) 50A outlets to plugs this into. And I'd love to just hang it on the wall at whichever location makes the most sense. I'll make my own bracket if needed... but, it would sure be nice if I didn't have to!
 

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