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What's in a firmware update before you install it?

Discussion in 'Model S' started by jkennebeck, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. jkennebeck

    jkennebeck Member

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    Does Tesla release the release notes of a specific firmware update anywhere? Is there any way to know what you are changing before you install the update?
     
  2. Max*

    Max* Banned

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    Not to the average user.
     
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  3. Max*

    Max* Banned

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    You asked the question, looking for answers because you did not know the answer, I gave you the answer, then you disagree with my answer :confused:
     
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  4. jkennebeck

    jkennebeck Member

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    That was a very poor response to my question. You didn't identify what the differences between an average user and a regular user
     
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  5. swegman

    swegman Member

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    You're being very harsh on Max. No one outside of Tesla knows what is in an update prior to its installation in a car, and then, only to the extent the release notes say anything. Many times the release notes simply say "bug fixes", whatever that may be. Tesla is known to download different versions of the firmware at the same time, and we (Tesla owner) don't even know what version we have received until you install it. To further complicate the matter, sometimes you will receive a firmware update OTA, and once you install it you discover it is the same version that was previously installed on the car (that happened to me twice).
     
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  6. MP3Mike

    MP3Mike Active Member

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    There is none. A regular user is an average user.
     
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  7. jkennebeck

    jkennebeck Member

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    also very helpful. thanks for your responses.
     
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  8. Max*

    Max* Banned

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    An average user is a regular user, right? Or are we playing a game of semantics here.
    This.



    But to add to this, I've seen Ingineer (a member here) mention what the OTA update did/does, in a lot more detailed manner than Tesla has done (he at least lists the subsystems affected).

    Now I don't know if he gets that info before the update is applies (after it's downloaded) or after it's been applied, but again, he's not an average user. I'm sure wk057 sees it too.

    Average user = regular user = average joe = you and me
    Not an average user = someone who tinkers in the car, has access to root and diagnostics, etc. They can see it, but you'd need to ask them for how they see it.
     
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  9. jkennebeck

    jkennebeck Member

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    Thanks guys. I submitted a formal request for them to publish this. Without it all we have is a mass of gray speculation about what an update contains. And if the option exists to keep putting off update 'A' until such time as update 'B' shows up, then the end user has the option to choose what/when to update. Obviously safety issues should be published as mandatory updates. I just don't know why they wouldn't have this info available to everyone. Max, I wasn't being mean, I just thought your first reply intimated that there were "special folks" getting "special treatment". I understand what you mean now by the folks that 'tinker' with their cars. But I don't know how they would know the contents of an update before installation. Pretty cool if they did.
    Bottom line is, what is the point of keeping users guessing about what they are putting in their cars that might make things worse for them?

    The page that says 'minor bug fixes' could use some improvement too. Why not list what they actually fixed? Very confusing process for a company that seems pretty open (API, various 3rd party apps, etc).
     
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  10. swegman

    swegman Member

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    Tesla doesn't want us to know, that is why it is not published. Many people have requested of Tesla to indicate what is in each update so they can decide whether or not to install the update. Such requests fall on deaf ears.

    Also be aware that some updates have made changes that many people consider detrimental, such as reducing power in the Ludicrous/launch mode operation. I could be wrong, but I don't think Tesla indicated such at the time the updates were sent (other than perhaps indicating that changes were made to prolong battery life). It took for the owners to discover the reduced power (performance) on their own.
     
  11. MP3Mike

    MP3Mike Active Member

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    Which with the most recent update appears to have been restored.
     
  12. jkennebeck

    jkennebeck Member

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    Yep i read they rescinded that restriction
     

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