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What's your rated range again?

My SR+ at the full charge today. 380 km and no regen.

48799621708_f68cd01848_c.jpg
That's how its 'supposed' to work at 100% charge. I say supposed to because in a Tesla you loose all regen. In my volts there was no loss in regen. In my wife's bolt its reduced by ~ 1/2, but still has pretty good regen at 100% and its fully back by ~ 95%.

Curious if your regen dots completely go away by 90% which is how mine used to work, but now it runs until ~ 80% with regen dots on and others have reported something similar.
 
That's how its 'supposed' to work at 100% charge. I say supposed to because in a Tesla you loose all regen. In my volts there was no loss in regen. In my wife's bolt its reduced by ~ 1/2, but still has pretty good regen at 100% and its fully back by ~ 95%.

Curious if your regen dots completely go away by 90% which is how mine used to work, but now it runs until ~ 80% with regen dots on and others have reported something similar.

Interesting and yet so odd. As full regen on a Tesla and/or a bolt is about 60kw and the bolt maxes out dcfc at 55kw and will scale that back to 30kw or so much lower than 95% maybe even lower than 80%. I guess they figure regen is not long term and won't affect battery the same way but what if you're going down a mountain? I wonder if they use the friction brakes at all at high soc to provide regen feel since they have blended brakes?

Edit: anyways my theory is that vehicles with blended brakes use some friction brakes at high soc to provide regen feel without harming the battery. Tesla with no blended brakes has no way to use the friction brakes and there's nowhere to dump the extra power if not the battery unless they strap on a 100-200lb resistor.
 
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That's how its 'supposed' to work at 100% charge. I say supposed to because in a Tesla you loose all regen. In my volts there was no loss in regen. In my wife's bolt its reduced by ~ 1/2, but still has pretty good regen at 100% and its fully back by ~ 95%.

Curious if your regen dots completely go away by 90% which is how mine used to work, but now it runs until ~ 80% with regen dots on and others have reported something similar.

I remembered to look today, and I have no regen dots at 80%.
 
Tesla with no blended brakes has no way to use the friction brakes and there's nowhere to dump the extra power if not the battery unless they strap on a 100-200lb resistor.
Wouldn't take much to dissipate certainly not 200 pounds. A resistance heating element might weigh 5 pounds, getting rid of the heat from that MIGHT be the problem.
 
In my volts there was no loss in regen. In my wife's bolt its reduced by ~ 1/2, but still has pretty good regen at 100% and its fully back by ~ 95%.

Yes in my Volt I have no loss in regen at 100%, even more I could get some more mileage with the regen. Let's say I was at 100 km at the full charge and I was driving with L and regen on demand and I could get it up to 103 km or so.

I guess in Chevys they have some gap for the battery to not to get real 100% that's why you can charge them to 100% everyday.

Curious if your regen dots completely go away by 90% which is how mine used to work, but now it runs until ~ 80% with regen dots on and others have reported something similar.

Mine is going away at about 80-70% I didn't pay to much attention though.
 
Yes in my Volt I have no loss in regen at 100%, even more I could get some more mileage with the regen. Let's say I was at 100 km at the full charge and I was driving with L and regen on demand and I could get it up to 103 km or so.

I guess in Chevys they have some gap for the battery to not to get real 100% that's why you can charge them to 100% everyday.



Mine is going away at about 80-70% I didn't pay to much attention though.
Yes, the volts only charge to around 86-92% of the total battery (depends on gen 1 or gen 2) so there is some buffer. Ie, in the gen2 the battery is 18.4kwh, but they only let you access 14.1kwh. if you have a Bluetooth obd2 reader there is a great app called mygreenvolt written by a guy in Kitchener that gives you tonnes of real time info on the battery and car in general.
 
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So that gives 479km at 100%. Did you ever have 499 or 523 ( with the +5% upgrade ) km? Is running down below 20% & then charging to 90-100% a way to "recalibrate" the battery pack? We never had the +500km show up.
Yes, when I first got my car I would charge 100% to ~ 499km and 90% to ~ 450km. But then over the winter 90% (which is what I usually do) started showing 447km, then 442 km. I figured it was maybe to do with the cold and perhaps the battery holding slightly less charge, but when it got warmer the estimated range didn't return. It does seem like a lot of AWD owners have 'settled' down to the ~ 480km 100% charge, ~ 430km 90% charge. You have an AWD as well from your sig, so are you seeing similar?

The 523km is only for LR RWD, and its its not actually 'real' range. It is just Tesla updated the calculations since the RWD is slightly more efficient than the AWD.
 
I see 480 km at 100% charge now. Exactly one year old. 25,000 km.
Hmm, so AWD and PAWD all seem to be converging on the same numbers. I can't see everyone's car 'degrading' at the same rate. I'm thinking this is more some software calculation happening....if it were degrading you would think there would be a bit of a spread.
 
Hmm, so AWD and PAWD all seem to be converging on the same numbers. I can't see everyone's car 'degrading' at the same rate. I'm thinking this is more some software calculation happening....if it were degrading you would think there would be a bit of a spread.

Mine's at 467km equivalent and went as low as 459km at one point. But I too think it's software.
 
Mine's at 467km equivalent and went as low as 459km at one point. But I too think it's software.
Today just as an experiment I changed my tire size in the GUI to 20" despite having 18" after market rims on the car. The software says tire selection will affected the calculated range so I'm just curious what will happen if I drive with 20" selected for a few days then switch back to 18"
 
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Today just as an experiment I changed my tire size in the GUI to 20" despite having 18" after market rims on the car. The software says tire selection will affected the calculated range so I'm just curious what will happen if I drive with 20" selected for a few days then switch back to 18"

Set a destination and check the estimated percentage at arrival. I'd be interested to see if that updates/changes right away when you change wheel size.
 
Hmm, so AWD and PAWD all seem to be converging on the same numbers. I can't see everyone's car 'degrading' at the same rate. I'm thinking this is more some software calculation happening....if it were degrading you would think there would be a bit of a spread.
I would think the battery for the first batch awd is probably under capacity. It never truly reached the advertised 499 rates range.
 

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