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Where to mount my life hammer

Maguramishi

New Member
Oct 4, 2019
3
0
The Netherlands
Does anybody have tips about how and where to mount a life hammer?
Most hammer mounts come with these spikes/needles to fix them to the fabric but then the hammer is out of reach when you’re strapped tight by the safety belt. On the other hand I don’t want to fix it on a surface that blows up because of the airbags. So where do you fit your life hammer and why?
 

dmurphy

Buster: 11/25/14 - 6/20/21. So sorely missed.
Supporting Member
Dec 7, 2018
3,763
5,097
New Jersey - Morris County
I don’t have one in the passenger cabin (I guess I should) ... but ... drivers’ door lower pocket? Most “out of sight yet still accessible and not in an air bag path” place I can think of.
 

Beckler

Member
Oct 22, 2012
607
550
Canada
Those hammers can be hard to break glass with sometimes. Have you considered using a spring loaded punch instead? Something like this. They're small and sit in the console tray

ResQme Vehicle Escape Tool

Best solution: have both. :) Actually, especially Tesla which seems safety-conscious, should have an escape tool built-in. Should've been standard in all cars in fact decades ago but manufacturers are stupid. Instead they gave us a cigarette lighter standard on every single vehicle ever made.
 

XLR82XS

D M C
Jul 26, 2019
3,147
1,802
SWFL | Vegas
Best solution: have both. :) Actually, especially Tesla which seems safety-conscious, should have an escape tool built-in. Should've been standard in all cars in fact decades ago but manufacturers are stupid. Instead they gave us a cigarette lighter standard on every single vehicle ever made.
Too much cost per vehicle. You think they'd offer that after removing door pocket lights, frunk hooks & carpet mat after 2019? That "cigarette lighter" doesn't come with a push-lighter - it's a 12V power outlet.
 
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Sam1

Active Member
Sep 11, 2019
1,122
997
NV
How does window tint affect effectiveness of the tools?

The hammer it will affect it significantly, because you'll be trying to bash the window from the inside. depending on the tint itself, it can absorb some of the impact and be harder to break and the tint will also hold the glass together. For the spring loaded punch tool, the tint will hold the shattered glass together, but the tool will have zero issues shattering the glass as expected.

That's one of the many reasons I have a punch instead of hammer. The primary reason is that if you have an injured arm or shoulder, or you're squeezed in tight from crumpled up parts in the vehicle, there's no way you're going to swing that hammer hard enough to break the glass.
 
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CyberGus

Not Just a Member
May 5, 2020
1,004
2,181
Austin, TX
Tesla_Cybertruck_damaged_window.jpg


A heavy steel ball should work
 

SWFlaM3

Member
Apr 21, 2020
24
15
Florida
I have a spring loaded break tool that inserts into the 12v outlet with two USB inputs. If the tool is not secured someplace it might be hard to find after an accident. BTW...the impact tools are not designed to break laminated glass so say the instructions. Read the glass markings on your cars. My Lexus RC F has non laminated glass in the rear side windows only.
 

Sam1

Active Member
Sep 11, 2019
1,122
997
NV
BTW...the impact tools are not designed to break laminated glass so say the instructions. Read the glass markings on your cars. My Lexus RC F has non laminated glass in the rear side windows only.

Yeah and if you google videos online, there's quite a few where people break the hammers trying to break the glass.
 

RayK

Active Member
Apr 5, 2016
2,122
2,093
San Jose, CA
I've got one "mounted" in each back seat pocket, for the rear passenger(s). This is based on the assumption that since the front doors have the emergency egress latches, the people in back need a way to get out if the electrics fail. I'm hoping that they're not ever needed.
 
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SWFlaM3

Member
Apr 21, 2020
24
15
Florida
I've got one "mounted" in each back seat pocket, for the rear passenger(s). This is based on the assumption that since the front doors have the emergency egress latches, the people in back need a way to get out if the electrics fail. I'm hoping that they're not ever needed.

you better have something up front to break the window and cut the seat belt when you are upside down under water and disoriented. You can’t open a door under water until the car fills with water to equalize the pressure. Cut the seat belt to drop You onto the headliner, smash the window (electric window will work for a short time), swim out. The tool has to be permanently mounted or stored. If not it will “disappear “ in a collision. By law console storage and glove boxes have to be latched so stuff doesn’t come flying out all over the car due to a collision.

how hard can you swing a hammer under water? The water will also absorb some of the impact. That’s why I have a spring loaded breaker as well as a hammer in the center console. I was thinking about visiting a junk yard and testing the tools on laminated and none laminated glass. If I have to pay for the window it would be worth the pease of mind of knowing they work.
 
Last edited:

silentcorp

Member
Jul 20, 2018
514
671
Denver CO
A headrest taken off can be used as well to break windows, just hit the metal poles from the headrest on the window. Works in an emergency if you don't have a hammer.
 

android04

Member
Apr 1, 2016
447
451
Crete, Nebraska
Mine sits loose in the bottom of the rear center console. Not ideal, but accessible if strapped in.

I've tried other locations, but they all tend to disrupt the minimalist interior design.
That's where I have mine, in the cubby under the center armrest. I think it's the best place because it's accessible by driver and passenger and will not get lost if the car flips over (unlike the ones that are kept loose in the door pockets or elsewhere).
 

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