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Why did you cancel your Model 3 reservation?

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by aviators99, Jun 20, 2016.

  1. Dan Detweiler

    Dan Detweiler Member

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    For some, there really is a "vroom-vroom" factor, as I call it. They truly must have a sound to confirm they have indeed depressed the accelerator pedal. I don't get it personally but to each his own.

    Dan
     
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  2. Scott-P

    Scott-P Member

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    Excellent suggestion. 1980 MGB here...

    LBCs and Tesla's: made for each other...
     
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  3. Red Sage

    Red Sage The Cybernetic Samurai

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    It works great, right up to the point where they notice the inherent delay in ICE... You press the accelerator, and then wait. It was interminable with pushrod V8 carbureted engines. Vastly improved with multicam fuel injected inline four cylinders. Instantaneous and unmatched with electric drive.

    I really liked the way that Adam Carolla put it on his show CarCast, starting around 1:30 into this (Not even remotely safe for work.)...

    "What is speed, and what is the sensation of speed?"
    "Mash your foot into the accelerator, and then count..."
    "Mash your foot down, and then wait..."
     
  4. mbhforum

    mbhforum Member

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    I cancelled my reservation yesterday as I put a deposit on a CPO model S. Ultimately I decided with a growing family (kids 2 and 4), I wanted something a little more roomy as we always take my wife's SUV. After test driving the model S, I didn't want anything smaller.
     
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  5. internalaudit

    internalaudit Member

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    With talks about Kia/Hyundai offering BEV in 2018/19, the Honda Clarity BEV end of 2017 and Toyota by 2020 (I'm not interested in Euro cars that will be priced at luxury car prices and/or until the German electric gremlins disappear), I would like to wait it out by not cancelling my reservation, which is around the 72k mark.

    But something in me thinks that many of the BEVs will not be offered in the AWD version (maybe perhaps the Korean SUV BEVs but I'd rather drive a sedan) and that is going to be my process of elimination (don't want to get into the analysis paralysis). I will want a BEV with AWD and minimum 200 miles (outside winter) and the bonus for Tesla is that annual inspections are not required to maintain the factory warranty though I think it will be during the extended warranty period.

    The only thing that is a bit concerting would be the reliability of Tesla cars and whether extended warranty will be available for the Model 3 since I have been buying extended warranty for peace of mind on our Honda's and Toyota and because we tend to keep our vehicles as long as the upkeep doesn't become costly or irritating.
     
  6. omgwtfbyobbq

    omgwtfbyobbq Member

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    I haven't cancelled my reservation, but if I do, it'll be because of Tesla's relatively high service fees, parts availability/fees, lack of documentation, supercharger fees, and rabid fanbois. ;)
     
  7. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    #527 JeffK, Jan 13, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2017
    We can easily see by Tesla's financials that they aren't making major profits from Service centers.
    Model S/X are low volume cars, parts are going to be expensive.
    There's plenty of documentation for end users. Documentation/videos for first responders, Body shops can get certification. Tesla provides service manuals where required by law and if you want a run of the mill manual then you can write Chilton a letter.

    Side note: An oil change on a Lamborghini Murcielago might cost you $2000, but I'm pretty sure they're making a profit.

    Tesla pays its employees well and personally, I'd rather have someone who likes his job doing maintenance on my car vs someone who doesn't want to be there. I'm fairly certain Model 3 will have cheaper parts as volume will be much higher.

    Supercharging fees will be negligible for the majority of the population. Many people won't even use the free 400 kWh.

    As for the rabid fanbois.... it's only going to get worse for you there :)
     
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  8. ummgood

    ummgood Member

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    I agree with most of what you wrote but the bolded statement. Can they???

    I have a friend and he works for a major insurance company managing the body shops in ATX for his company. He knows these guys. If I talk about the place my truck got fixed he asks who helped me by name. That is how well he knows the body shops. This is a large city with hundreds if not thousands of Teslas running around. When I told him on 3/31 I put in a reservation on a Model 3 the first words that came out of his mouth were "pray you don't wreck it". He said for him Teslas are a nightmare. There is only one body shop in ATX (millions of people in the area) that is certified to repair them. Now why is that? I don't know but in a town this big with this many Teslas roaming around you would think there would at least be a few. Is the certification too difficult? Is there something about it that is deterring body shops from fixing them? I don't know but it is a major concern of mine.
     
  9. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    The classes to get certification cost money. If body shops don't see a value then they wouldn't do it.

    According to Tesla, there are two body shops in Austin, TX, three in Houston, and one in San Antonio.
    Find an Approved Body Shop
     
  10. ummgood

    ummgood Member

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    Sorry for my mistake there are two. That still means I really don't have a choice where to get my car repaired. I probably wouldn't take it up to the more North site since I live in SW Austin and that is a good 30 minute drive for me. Also possible that either he wasn't aware of the north one because it is affiliated to dealership.

    Why do the certifications cost money? Isn't it in Tesla's best interest to get as many on board as possible? Perhaps they could have a waiting list and only do a few a month to satisfy demand or something like that. I can almost guarantee you that if someone paid money to get it they are going to charge a premium for the service.
     
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  11. Red Sage

    Red Sage The Cybernetic Samurai

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    BMW has schools for people to become certified to repair their vehicles. The schools are not free. I would expect that certification for repairs on most major brands are not free. Tesla's Generation II cars, Model S and Model X, are made of aluminum. Both body panels and frame. I would expect certification for bodywork on these cars would include specific means to repair particular types of damage. And, demonstration by students that they can perform such repairs satisfactorily. Repair work on steel and iron is not the same. If a particular shop has experienced personnel who have worked with aluminum bodies and frames successfully in the past, they likely already have the specialized equipment on hand. If not, they will need to purchase it. Things cost money and stuff.
     
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  12. ummgood

    ummgood Member

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    That might be true. I was just bringing all this up because right now this is a negative point when buying a Tesla. Is there a way they could accelerate this so more body shops can work on their cars. Yes there still needs to be some kind of approval but at the same time if only 2 body shops repair them in such a major area that is a problem in my book. Can Tesla work with shops that already support aluminum cars to get them on board faster with less training that they could wave the fee until they have enough so it isn't a problem?
     
  13. internalaudit

    internalaudit Member

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    I'm in Canada (so I no nothing about the insurance laws in the US and I haven't been into many fender benders here to really know my rights) but can we hold the insurance company to have the car repaired at an accredited Tesla repair facility or will the insurance company have its short list of shops?

    For regular cars, my insurance already has a list of authorized repair shops. I doubt they will allow me to go to certified Tesla or they may do so but jack up my premium.
     
  14. ummgood

    ummgood Member

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    In the US they are required by law to let you have the car repaired wherever you like. Now with that said I am sure if you pick a shop that is charging outrageous rates then they will only cover what they think the damage would cost to repair and not what it actually cost.

    With that said the guy I know would have the Tesla repaired at the Tesla shop. Not sure about other insurance companies.
     
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  15. Red Sage

    Red Sage The Cybernetic Samurai

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    The 'acceleration' comes from releasing the Model 3. With more owners on the road, there will be more accidents. So more repair shops will be able to share the wealth of work. When only around 25,000 expensive all-aluminum cars are on the market each year, there isn't enough of an installed user base to have an authorized repair shop on every corner. With 200,000+ on the road each year, you are more likely to get regular business. So the expense of being certified can be spread over more jobs. That is the needed incentive. Nothing more.
     
  16. omgwtfbyobbq

    omgwtfbyobbq Member

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    Haha, it might get worse! :D

    For parts, Tesla is a lot better than in the past, but I think they still need to step up, especially with the Model 3. I doubt anyone's going to be happy even a $600 bumper cover. Granted, their bumper cover prices are now in line with other manufacturers, but there still aren't any aftermarket OEM options, and many parts aren't as competitive in terms of price. Their volume isn't half bad either at ~30k Model S sales/year. I think they're solidly in the middle of all care models in terms of sales.

    Tesla replacement parts now 66% cheaper. Bumper Cover was $1200 now $320

    As for the financials, if they're spending the majority on capex, I can see that. They're using Model S/X and Roadster service fees to subsidize the expansion of their service centers. If capex spending relatively low, that could be indicative of them trading higher service costs for lower vehicle quality. Do you know of any reports that break up what their service centers costs are?

    And yeah, supercharger fees aren't a big deal for most, but for me they were nice. I can see why they would operate the network at cost, but compared to PV at home, superchargers are pretty expensive. I wish they had something where owners could invest in a solar or wind farm that Tesla would build, and get less expensive electricity based on that investment.

    I've never seen a Tesla FSM offered to the general public, or software tools. They have a really long way to go there IMO. I can buy (or download) the FSM for my old Prius that goes over anything I would need to fix on that car. Tesla doesn't offer that to the public. On a side note, I'll see your $2000 oil change and raise you a $4500 battery pack replacement that was quoted to my friend on her Prius a few months ago. $tealerships and $ervice centers are gonna go for that $$$. On the plus side, I bought the car from her for $500 more than the dealer offered and fixed the pack for $35 and 6 hours of my time thanks to my handy dandy FSM.

    Until Tesla offers that level of customer service, and by that I mean the FSM part, not the crazy high prices part, I'm probably going to sit this one out.
     
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  17. ummgood

    ummgood Member

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    Well I might have a new life event that might cause me to give up my reservation. I am hoping not but it is a possibility.

    I have a friend that has a real low end house in Austin and I have the opportunity to buy it to make it into a rental. I would be making a few hundred on top of the mortgage/insurance/tax payments each month so it should hopefully keep itself afloat without needing any money from my normal lifestyle expenses. The goal for me is to diversify for retirement and all I desire right now is for the house to sustain itself for the next 20 years before I hit retirement age. This is my first time even considering buying a rental but this house fell in my lap and I happen to have enough cash for 20% down on it without pulling from retirement accounts or having to leverage any of my existing equity on my primary home.

    With that said I have had a huge pillow of money that I could fall back on if I lost my job and that will be now rolled into this house. I need to build that back up so it might affect my willingness to buy the Tesla. It probably will depend on how quickly it rents etc... I have a fall back plan if I lose my job but it is much tighter than it was before. I could live for 1 year without income and that would be reduced now to about 4 months. I haven't been unemployed since graduating college in '99 so it isn't something that I have had to worry about but I am extremely conservative. But the risk might pay off and it would be nice to have a house for each of my 3 kids to leave on when I pass. I currently have one house and I'll be inheriting my parent's house and possibly this new rental.

    Anyway for now I'll keep my reservation funds but I might decide to be a cheap car buyer in the future.
     
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  18. internalaudit

    internalaudit Member

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    Interesting.

    Tesla is working on opening up its service tools and helping owners repair their own cars with replacement parts
    Tesla is working on opening up its service tools and helping owners repair their own cars with replacement parts
     
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  19. internalaudit

    internalaudit Member

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    #539 internalaudit, Feb 1, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2017
    Good strategy. If there is a really good investment opportunity that is almost fool-proof and has little downside, go with it. A car is a depreciating asset and an EV makes a lot of sense for those who tend to drive a lot.

    I won't be cancelling because it's only $1k anyway but will likely be waiting for other full electric vehicles to come to market (hopefully, configuration stages and taking ownership will be pushed farther from me but I'm at around 72k in line). Maybe I won't even need AWD since Toyota or Honda (known generally for reliability and cheaper maintenance) or even Nissan (Leaf 2.0) may not offer BEVs with AWD.

    I too am just going to be a little more practical but if I switch jobs or set up a home business that require a lot more driving, I will still consider going for a BEV (battery electric vehicle) because the cost of travel will be 1/2 to 1/3 of what I am paying on my 11 Accord 4-cylinder.

    If I will still be commuting by public transportation, then less reason to get an EV. I'm just not sure how maintenance costs will be for a Tesla vehicle in the future. For a Toyota, Honda or Nissan, repair outside the drive train unit/ motor is kinda established.
     
  20. dsvick

    dsvick Member

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    Diversifying your retirement funds is a good idea, especially if you can end up making more on them than just letting them sit in a savings account somewhere. With that being said, make sure you really research what it takes to be a landlord. My wife and I are right now, and can't wait to stop. Part of the issue is that the house is older and is starting to need some maintenance but the worst part is living in constant fear of that 2AM phone call in the middle of winter saying the furnace is out, or the bottom of the hot water heater fell out, or the roof is leaking. Most of it isn't the financial pat of it either, it is just that you're the landlord and it is your responsibility to take care of those things in a timely manner.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
     
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