Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Will be away for a week - is it OK to leave car unplugged?

This site may earn commission on affiliate links.
I only charge at work and not at home. The parking lot I park in does not have a supercharger within proximity. Since I'll be going on a trip next week for 6 days, does anyone have any recommendations as to what I can do for my Model 3 to ensure that I don't have to resurrect my car from the dead? Is there a power saving mode I can put on to ensure that I at least have some charge? I typically charge to 85% so I should have at least 230 miles of charge before I leave for my trip.

Any input is appreciated!

Thanks
 
In the unlikely event the car does get down to 5%, the M3 will enter a low-power consumption mode where the Battery stops supporting the onboard electronics to slow the discharge rate to approximately 4% per month (although this can kill your 12V battery).
 
  • Informative
Reactions: tracksyde
Yes that would be great. I noticed a big difference in idle consumption when using a service like Teslalog or TeslaFi. They get data from the car every minute meaning the car can never 'go to sleep'. Although you can tell those services to stop polling data. Or you can just disable them while you are gone.
 
I'd try to make sure you have at least a minimum charge of 40% in case you see the 20 mile/day vampire losses that some people are reporting. But that's an outlier case.

In any other electric car there'd be no worry. Too bad Tesla is an outlier in that regard.

Don't forget to make sure it's in the low power setting.

I don't think there is such a thing (yet).
 
I only charge at work and not at home. The parking lot I park in does not have a supercharger within proximity. Since I'll be going on a trip next week for 6 days, does anyone have any recommendations as to what I can do for my Model 3 to ensure that I don't have to resurrect my car from the dead? Is there a power saving mode I can put on to ensure that I at least have some charge? I typically charge to 85% so I should have at least 230 miles of charge before I leave for my trip.

Any input is appreciated!

Thanks

Keep in mind you can use extension cords if they are thick enough. You can even charge at 50 amps (actual draw is less, of course) on monstrosities like this https://www.amazon.com/Camco-Extension-PowerGrip-Convenient-Carrying/dp/B0024ECIP0
 
I don't have my 3 yet, but I could have sworn I read something about this, maybe it's only in the works. I'll dig around.

Read the manual some, the Model 3 will enter a low power mode if it gets down to 5% as it stops powering electronics and keeping the 12v battery charged to protect the battery pack. You can't select this and I doubt you'd want to. Probably the best advice to not keep checking it with apps and "waking it up" is the best. It would be nice if Tesla would give some long term storage guidelines, though. Probably a good question for a service center.
 
Last edited:
The point about disabling data services like Teslalog and TeslaFi, and using your app to check on the car can't be stressed enough.

If you follow guidance on those two points, you don't even need to put the car into energy saving mode and you'll still have a lot of battery left when you return. If I had to guess? Leave at 80%, follow the above guidance, and you'll come back to 68%.
 
I agree about disabling data services.... still, wouldn't it be great to have a single "long term parking" toggle switch to throw in these situations? It would be nice to not "disable" much of anything, but to force the car to do power-hungry things infrequently. You still get full functionality, but without the snappy response time that you would only appreciate when the car is driven regularly.

Heck, my fridge has this "vacation" feature that reduces the compressor runtime and the defrost cycle.
 
The point about disabling data services like Teslalog and TeslaFi, and using your app to check on the car can't be stressed enough.

If you follow guidance on those two points, you don't even need to put the car into energy saving mode and you'll still have a lot of battery left when you return. If I had to guess? Leave at 80%, follow the above guidance, and you'll come back to 68%.
Don’t guess, because you don’t own a Model 3. The Model 3 does not have an energy saving mode yet.
 
I stand by my guess and my right to make it. It's my experience that energy saving mode doesn't make a big difference but letting any Tesla go into deep sleep and leaving it alone does make a big difference.

Let's see. I'm eager to see what the OP's experience ends up being.