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Will this day be coming

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by GKwey, Mar 3, 2016.

  1. GKwey

    GKwey Member

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    That you can drive your Model 3 around the world without spending a penny on fuel?

    With Model 3 targeting mass market, superchargers sure will start popping up south of US border all the way to Argentina and north to Alaska. So road trip with Model 3 crisscross America continent free of fuel expense can be a very popular touring option.

    Then if the cruise that takes you across Atlantic or Pacific oceans can also bring along your Model 3 for a fees. Yah, it's very likely you would want to do road trips in Europe/England or China with your own Tesla.
     
  2. MiamiNole

    MiamiNole Member

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    Seeing how I'm nowhere near retirement, I probably wouldn't have the time to do one of these "road trips" anytime soon.

    And assuming that type of supercharging network gets built worldwide, I still wouldn't want to spend that much time driving.

    I think the significant change in the way we do travel would be when long range EVs are widely available for rental. Why would I want to worry about the hassle of shipping my own car overseas just to take advantage of a charging network when I could simply just rent an EV once I get across the pond, or wherever my destination is?

    I'm actually a roller coaster enthusiast and I could very well see myself doing that once I start touring overseas theme parks.
     
  3. deonb

    deonb Active Member

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    The U.S. and Europe uses different charging mechanisms, so it's unlikely that a Model 3 bought in the U.S. would work in Europe. A Model S wouldn't either. This is probably unlikely to change for the next 100 years, if ever.

    Though it would have been very cool if there was a vehicle-carrying Hyperloop across the Atlantic - mankind just doesn't have the willpower to make that happen.
     
  4. jonnyg

    jonnyg Member

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    With a robust Autopilot system in place, you wouldn't have to drive at all! :wink:
     
  5. raysspl

    raysspl Member

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    I have a gut feeling Model S Autopilot won't make it to Model 3 until 2019-2020
     
  6. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    I'll be shocked. My guess is that the 3 will have more sensors than current Ss do (though likely not more than contemporary Ss and Xs.) The sensors themselves aren't that expensive, and there's very little unique development Tesla would have to do for the additional car beyond what they'd already be doing. Autopilot and the Superchargers are two of Tesla's biggest selling points - there's no way they'd compromise either one of those unless they really, really have to.
    Walter

    - - - Updated - - -

    Agree with *most* of this - I was actually going to make the point about the different charge ports. However, while I doubt either charge port is changing any time soon, recognize that the signalling is identical in both cases, and for AC and DC in both cases.

    That means that either car can charge on the other standards with only a simple dumb adapter like the current Tesla J1772 one - including supercharging in the other regions, unless I'm very confused. Supercharging should be at the same rates, too (assuming the adapter has big wires in it.)

    AC charging either type of car in the other zone will be at reduced maximum rates - the EU car isn't designed to handle the high amperage on one phase the US car can take, the US car can't benefit from the additional phases the EU car is designed for.
    Walter
     
  7. Johan

    Johan Took a TSLA bear test. Came back negative.

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    I think this will be about as common as bringing your ICE car for an overseas vacation drive. After all gasoline is the same everywhere and it's not that expensive.
     
  8. wdolson

    wdolson Active Member

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    Somebody has actually done the preliminary proof of concept design for a tunnel under the Bering Straits between Alaska and Siberia. It would be tricky, but it is possible with today's technology. The biggest sticking point is it would have to be a joint project between Russia and the US and that relationship is not warm at the moment.

    The design would be a rail tunnel that came to the surface on Big and Little Diomedes Islands and run under the sea bed the rest of the way. The railroad would probably be electric, diesel would produce too much exhaust that needed to be vented. Both sides would have to build rail up to the ends of the tunnel on their end. In the end it would work like the Channel Tunnel, you would load your car on the train on one end, and then pick it up on the other. Most people loading cars would probably load them well away from the tunnel and the cars would ride for thousands of miles. Most of the traffic would be freight. It would enable faster of movement of freight from Asia to North America and cheaper too.

    In the end, someone could travel via surface travel from the UK to Argentina.

    An Atlantic tunnel would be much tougher to do. The entire Atlantic has a volcanic ridge running down the middle of it and the run underwater is many times longer than a Bering Straits tunnel. Iceland is where the ridge comes above water. The Atlantic widens about an inch a year with frequent volcanic eruptions. The Pacific is shrinking as North America moves westward with respect to Asia (which is why the ocean is rimmed with the Rim of Fire), but the entire Bering Strait is on one tectonic plate so it isn't going anywhere. The Pacific Plate ends at the Aleutian Islands (they exist because the Pacific Plate is being pushed under the Aleutians there).
     

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