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Will this outlet work for level 2 charging?

Luminous

Member
Mar 9, 2021
19
5
13601
Hello,

I have a 30 amp 220v electric dryer outlet that is idle as we use gas dryer. I bought Tesla adapter that gives me over 20 mph charge from that outlet however, I want to have plug in the garage and therefore will need to move electric connection about 4 feet past the garage wall. I am planning to get this matching outlet from Amazon and have it wired by electrician to that line. Any gotchas I need to know? Thanks!

 
Oct 3, 2020
150
171
Seattle
Hello,

I have a 30 amp 220v electric dryer outlet that is idle as we use gas dryer. I bought Tesla adapter that gives me over 20 mph charge from that outlet however, I want to have plug in the garage and therefore will need to move electric connection about 4 feet past the garage wall. I am planning to get this matching outlet from Amazon and have it wired by electrician to that line. Any gotchas I need to know? Thanks!


Is your circuit breaker panel located in the garage by chance?

If not, then your plan is the way to go and should work fine.
 

MN-MS100D

Member
Dec 10, 2018
101
66
Minnesota
10-30's are obsolete and have no ground wire and are not allowed for new construction. Maybe have your electrician wire you a 14-30, or if you have the capacity, a 6-50 or a 14-50 instead. That would be best in the long run. Remember to demolish the old 10-30 receptacle.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
5,977
6,891
Boise, ID
10-30's are obsolete and have no ground wire and are not allowed for new construction. Maybe have your electrician wire you a 14-30, or if you have the capacity, a 6-50 or a 14-50 instead. That would be best in the long run. Remember to demolish the old 10-30 receptacle.
Well, 10-30's can't be installed new, but moving an existing one is probably still allowed. As to your suggestions, you kind of left something out. It's already a 30A circuit. If the extra wire is there in the cable in the wall, then sure, make it a 14-30, but if not, I would just change it to a 6-30. That is still just three wires, but is 240V only instead of dual voltage.
 

Luminous

Member
Mar 9, 2021
19
5
13601
To get 50A I would need to run new wire from breaker box which is in different corner of the house and one level lower, in the basement. Thus piggybacking on existing connection was chosen. The house is 30 years old so my thinking is that it's a 3 wire line.
 
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MN-MS100D

Member
Dec 10, 2018
101
66
Minnesota
Since the panel is nowhere near the receptacle, my 50 amp suggestion is probably not feasible, nor is one that requires a neutral + ground. Rocky is correct that a 6-30 outlet would work great and is the best idea, but you'd have to go to a 3rd party for that adapter. Can you please check what size and type of wiring you have in the circuit (Al vs Cu)?
 

Luminous

Member
Mar 9, 2021
19
5
13601
Since the panel is nowhere near the receptacle, my 50 amp suggestion is probably not feasible, nor is one that requires a neutral + ground. Rocky is correct that a 6-30 outlet would work great and is the best idea, but you'd have to go to a 3rd party for that adapter. Can you please check what size and type of wiring you have in the circuit (Al vs Cu)?
Line is copper and actually it has 4 wires
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
5,977
6,891
Boise, ID
Line is copper and actually it has 4 wires
Oh, well I'm going to go back to supporting @MN-MS100D 's earlier suggestion. That should be able to switch easily to a 14-30, which Tesla does already sell a plug for, without having to buy one from a 3rd party, like the 6-30 we were talking about earlier. The stuff from EVSEAdapters is really good, but it's always more expensive than buying the native ones that Tesla sells.
 
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Luminous

Member
Mar 9, 2021
19
5
13601
Oh, well I'm going to go back to supporting @MN-MS100D 's earlier suggestion. That should be able to switch easily to a 14-30, which Tesla does already sell a plug for, without having to buy one from a 3rd party, like the 6-30 we were talking about earlier. The stuff from EVSEAdapters is really good, but it's always more expensive than buying the native ones that Tesla sells.
Great! Now how do I figure out if line is 30A and can't handle 50amps? The line is connected to 2 connected breakers each rated 20A, so 40amp total.
 

bobby g

Member
Mar 13, 2020
210
110
The Inland Empire :)
Oh, well I'm going to go back to supporting @MN-MS100D 's earlier suggestion. That should be able to switch easily to a 14-30, which Tesla does already sell a plug for, without having to buy one from a 3rd party, like the 6-30 we were talking about earlier. The stuff from EVSEAdapters is really good, but it's always more expensive than buying the native ones that Tesla sells.
Some hardware stores have a collection of adapters, that could get you to a Tesla one. I used one at my mom's but decided that I was being jerkier than usual by taking electrons from a 102 year old lady that lives alone (and drives)
 

ATPMSD

Member
Mar 12, 2021
27
20
Atlanta, GA
Great! Now how do I figure out if line is 30A and can't handle 50amps? The line is connected to 2 connected breakers each rated 20A, so 40amp total.

Confused - I think said you have a 30A dryer outlet, if the plug is attached to a 20A dual-pole breaker then the plug is inappropriate.

What you seem to have is 240v, 20A circuit, which is 4.8kW (240v * 20A), and is not 40A “total.” You need to find out what the wire gauge size is so you can determine if you can increase the breaker size. If you cannot increase the amperage you may need to go to a 6-20 plug, which is a 240v, 20A outlet. Tesla makes an adapter for that plug.
 
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Luminous

Member
Mar 9, 2021
19
5
13601
Confused - I think said you have a 30A dryer outlet, if the plug is attached to a 20A dual-pole breaker then the plug is inappropriate.

What you seem to have is 240v, 20A circuit, which is 4.8kW (240v * 20A), and is not 40A “total.” You need to find out what the wire gauge size is so you can determine if you can increase the breaker size. If you cannot increase the amperage you may need to go to a 6-20 plug, which is a 240v, 20A outlet. Tesla makes an adapter for that plug.
I think those 2 connected breakers are called double pole, see on the picture with label dryer. But I can get bigger breakers if needed.

I can't tell wire gauge, maybe 10? Also see
double pole.jpg
wires.jpg
attached
 

ATPMSD

Member
Mar 12, 2021
27
20
Atlanta, GA
The “dryer” breaker is a dual-pole breaker. You appear to have a 240 volt 20 amp circuit, so the 10-30 plug is improper since the plug type and breaker “should” match. The wires “look” thicker than what is found on the typical 20 amp circuit, but you really need to determine the wire gauge size so you can determine your options. If you open the breaker box you should be able to read the wire markings.
 

MN-MS100D

Member
Dec 10, 2018
101
66
Minnesota
We need to know wire size before making any more recommendations. From the information we have right now, you have a 20 amp, 240 volt circuit. This can be converted to a 6-20 receptacle but you'll need a 6-20 adapter from Tesla.

If your wiring is #10 AND your distance from the panel is not too far (<75', <2% drop), you can replace the breaker with a 30A/2P and use a 14-30 receptacle extended from the dryer box to your garage.
 
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