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Model S Gets Second Price Cut This Week – Starts at $69,420

Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk said Wednesday that the company’s Model S sedan would now start at $69,420, the second price cut for the car in a week.

Tuesday, Tesla updated the price of the Model S to start at $71,990, seemingly in a move to spur sales in a year-end push. The vehicle started the year priced at $80,000.

Wednesday’s adjustment seemed to be motivated by a pricing announcement for the upcoming Lucid Air electric sedan. The base model will sell for $77,400 before incentives, so $69,900 after the federal tax credit.

Tesla vehicles no longer qualify for the tax credit, but the company has still priced the base Model S lower than the Lucid Air after incentives. 

Musk seems to be dialing up the competition between Tesla and Lucid, which is expected to be Tesla’s first real challenger. The question is, will consumers buy a Tesla today, or wait for the base Lucid Air in 2022.

“The gauntlet has been thrown down!” Musk said in a tweet announcing the price change.

imola.zhp

Member
Jul 13, 2020
402
220
Memphis
Ordered an S to be delivered this week. Any experience in getting them to drop price before I take delivery?

If you haven't taken delivery, taking advantage of the price reduction should be very simple. When it happened to the Model Y, my understanding is people just reached out to their sales associates and requested the price reduction. Don't take delivery until the price is corrected.
 

beatle

Member
Aug 31, 2019
991
473
Springfield, VA
I would definitely take the $3k and run. I can't see too many people using more than $3k worth of supercharging over the life of their car. Heck, I've only spent $109.64 in the 1 year I've had the car, and that includes several road trips. All in all, about 10% of my kwh come from supercharging. If I ONLY supercharged and never used a destination charger, I'd be at just over $1k in supercharging costs in a year, which would take me ~3 years to break even with usage remaining the same.

As for FSD - I'd pay for it when it gets here. :)
 

Zorg

Active Member
Oct 24, 2017
1,374
1,219
Fremont, ca
To think that a model S was way above $100K a few years back! At this rate, the S will be $65K a few years from now. Maybe I'll replace the 3 with an S in a few years. It's such a great grand tourer. Now, if Elon could add storage in the door, it'd be perfect.
 

dgpcolorado

high altitude member
Apr 25, 2015
2,500
3,365
The Western Slope, Colorado
I would definitely take the $3k and run. I can't see too many people using more than $3k worth of supercharging over the life of their car. Heck, I've only spent $109.64 in the 1 year I've had the car, and that includes several road trips. All in all, about 10% of my kwh come from supercharging. If I ONLY supercharged and never used a destination charger, I'd be at just over $1k in supercharging costs in a year, which would take me ~3 years to break even with usage remaining the same.

As for FSD - I'd pay for it when it gets here. :)
I agree — I'd take the $3000 and give up free supercharging. I've Supercharged my car more than 458 times, so I use FUSC a lot, but $3000 will pay for a LOT of Supercharging.

This new price is roughly what my S-60 cost when new in 2014 (I bought it used in 2016). That's an amazing price drop/performance increase in just six years. Tesla's car pricing is more like a tech product than traditional autos.