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Fast charging aluminum battery offers safe alternative to conventional batteries

Discussion in 'Battery Discussion' started by tonygod, Apr 6, 2015.

  1. tonygod

    tonygod Member

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    Another story about an aluminum battery. This time from Stanford. The article is a bit light on details, but sounds promising.

    Aluminum, graphite and salt:

    For the experimental battery, the Stanford team placed the aluminum anode and graphite cathode, along with an ionic liquid electrolyte, inside a flexible polymer- coated pouch.
    "The electrolyte is basically a salt that's liquid at room temperature, so it's very safe," said Stanford graduate student Ming Gong, co-lead author of the Nature study.

    Safety:
    "In our study, we have videos showing that you can drill through the aluminum battery pouch, and it will continue working for a while longer without catching fire," Dai said. "But lithium batteries can go off in an unpredictable manner - in the air, the car or in your pocket. Besides safety, we have achieved major breakthroughs in aluminum battery performance."

    Charging:
    the Stanford team reported "unprecedented charging times" of down to one minute with the aluminum prototype

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-04-ultra-fast-aluminum-battery-safe-alternative.html#jCp
     
  2. dirkhh

    dirkhh Middle-aged Member

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    As usual, the devil is in the details. Production cost. Mass produceability (i.e., does it require material or processes that don't scale?). Reliability. Impact of temperature. How quickly can you discharge. Etc.
    I love reading about all the new battery technologies. But until someone has a path from lab sample to something that scales and is cost effective to produce... it's all of rather limited use.
     
  3. nwdiver

    nwdiver Active Member

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    #3 nwdiver, Apr 6, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2015
    Very exciting... did some brief research on Lithium vs Aluminum... I'm cautiously optimistic;

    On a sperate note... if there's any wikipidians reading this... the Al-ion page could use some editing...

    'As a fuel source for vehicles, batteries are only recently becoming more common while gasoline still forms the foundation of all vehicles. In order for aluminium-ion batteries to be the preferable choice, efficiency and cost must be improved, but more importantly, the safety of using batteries in cars has to be a primary focus too. In a crash, electric vehicles can catch on fire, raising major concerns and forcing car companies to take greater measures to ensure the safety of the passengers.'

    Sure... 'cause gasoline powered cars NEVER catch on fire.... right?

    H2S_Car_Fire_Montage_003.jpg

    I got this photo by google image searching 'car fire montage'... they're apparently very common :wink:
     
  4. freds

    freds Member

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    Yes it looks interesting, however no word on energy density and it is currently two volts per cell so can you say 14,000 batteries required? ok that is a little over the top, it all comes down to energy density for EV use.
     
  5. caddieo

    caddieo Member

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    As of yesterday evening, Elon Musk already commented on this. Quote: "Battery "breakthroughs" need to state power *and* energy density (not the same thing), plus how long they last. They usually fail on energy. Unquote.
     
  6. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    #6 JRP3, Apr 7, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2015
    As discussed in the It's the Batteries, Stupid! thread the energy density is poor at 40wh/kg, which is why they don't mention it in any article. (Compared to the 250wh/kg Tesla/Panasonic cells).
     
  7. voyager

    voyager Member

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    It was mentioned in a few articles. If they can double the energy density, it becomes interesting for vehicles with a low dry weight. Perhaps the batteries can even contribute to a vehicle's structural rigidity.
     
  8. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    Since the batteries are flexible they have little structural integrity of their own, so no. Not sure what you mean by "vehicles with low dry weight", even at double their density it's still more than three times worse than what Tesla is using.
     
  9. AB4EJ

    AB4EJ Member

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    Nice photo montage. BTW, car fires are indeed so common, that they have a name: "carbecue."
     
  10. AB4EJ

    AB4EJ Member

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    There is also the question of usable temperature range. The article states that the battery has certain properties "at room temperature." To be useful for automotive service the temperature range needs to be fairly wide, i.e., no boiling or freezing of electrolyte at any state of charge from -50 F to +150 F.
     

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