TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Lithium Air Battery?

Discussion in 'Battery Discussion' started by Jaxcoffee, Mar 13, 2014.

  1. Jaxcoffee

    Jaxcoffee Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2014
    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Paso Robles, CA
  2. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    4,886
    Location:
    San Luis Obispo, CA
    Tesla has patents to capitalize on this.
     
  3. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,502
    Location:
    Maine
    AFAIK:
    Very high volumetric energy-density
    High to medium(?) gravimetric energy-density (works by oxidation, so gets heavier as the metal oxidizes)
    Low power density
    Low efficiency (generates a lot of heat in use)
    Low cost of manufacture.
    Short life.
    Easy recycling

    Seems like it has good potential for use as an occasional-use range extender.

    Tesla has a patent on the idea of a hybrid li-ion/metal-air battery, although it's a pretty obvious idea so could just be to save time fending off patent trolls.
     
  4. jandkw

    jandkw Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    155
    Location:
    Cary, NC
    There are quite a number of viable battery development projects going on in the industry worldwide including Lithium-Air. I know IBM is working on the Lithium Air project (in Almaden Research Lab.) called Battery 500 (500mi/charge) since 2009 and targeted 2020 for production.
     
  5. kingwellenergy

    kingwellenergy New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    中国
    Such technology could transform regular electric vehicles, as well as plug-in hybrids and range-extended electric cars.
    The typical plug-in hybrid goes 10-20 miles on its smaller battery, but this could leap to 30-60 miles should VW's lithium-air chemistry prove viable.
    Full battery-electric vehicles would comfortably leap to 200-300 miles, maybe more if energy efficiency is towards the top end of VW's estimates. Alternatively, smaller, lighter battery packs could be used to match the range of current electric vehicles--beneficial in city cars, for example.
     
  6. curiousguy

    curiousguy curious member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    Michigan, United States
    this technology has major inherent drawbacks (as well as promises). currently the degradation of battery components by superoxide radicals formed during charging hinders progress in the field. IBM was a leader in Li-air research but they recently announced they will "diversify" to Na-air. Other relevant companies researching this are Liox and Polyplus. Also, JCESR (a govt initiative...) prefers Li/S and flow batteries over Li-air. basically until this problem with radicals being formed in the electrolyte is solved there is no commercialization on the horizon. This is not a trivial task. To put this in perspective, radicals are also the culprits for aging and cancer.
     
  7. Kandiru

    Kandiru Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2014
    Messages:
    503
    Location:
    USA
  8. Matias

    Matias Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,590
    Location:
    Finland
    "Despite the significant progress made by Prof Grey's team, they say a commercial lithium-air battery is at least 10 years away."
     
  9. Cyberax

    Cyberax Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2015
    Messages:
    270
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I worked with ex-lithium-air battery scientists. It's a holy grail of battery technology - theoretical density of Li-Air batteries is about the same as that of gasoline. So a Tesla-sized Li-Air battery could feasibly have several thousands miles of range.

    There's just one catch - nobody can make a reliable Li-Air battery. There are many way too many hurdles.
     
  10. curiousguy

    curiousguy curious member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    Michigan, United States
    This paper brings significant knowledge to the li-air field. The end product of discharge is not li2o2 but lioh. Which means the radicals which were previously eating the electrolyte are now reacting with water in a stable manner. Grey's group shows 2000 cycles with a capacity of 1000 mah/g and a discharge voltage of 2.7V. The hysteresis to charge also decreased to 200mV or so. This is basically at the level lithium sulfur batteries were a few years back. The only problem is (well disguised in the paper) the capacities per cm2 are very low, about 0.5mah/cm2 from my calculations based on the numbers given in the paper.
     

Share This Page