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Adjustable lowering links for Model S

I have a few sets of adjustable lowering links for the Model S with factory equipped air suspension for sale. They are a direct replacement can be install in 30 minutes. No modifications to factory parts required and completely reversible! Message me for price.
 

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Last edited:

lolachampcar

Well-Known Member
Nov 26, 2012
6,189
7,722
WPB Florida
I went looking the other day and found some data I had from a lower module design. I think this was an S Class but the point is that the MB lowers at speed like MS. I had to back out my offset as speed increased to keep the car from getting too low at highway speeds. Replacement adjustable links do not have this capability and thus must be used with care.

They are a great idea and perfectly useable (just bought a set myself). They just require careful testing to make sure your not near the damper bump stops or otherwise in an unacceptable damping zone (and that the rims are not rubbing/locking up).

New Page 1
 

lolachampcar

Well-Known Member
Nov 26, 2012
6,189
7,722
WPB Florida
The links replace the stock links between the ride height potentiometers and their respective suspension arms. The stock Tesla pieces are of a fixed length while the adjustable ones have ball link ends on a piece of threaded rod (with lock nuts). Changing to the adjustable links allows the owner to change the perceived ride height thus fool the active air suspension to a different ride height. Beware that (1) lowering the car increases negative camber which is tied to extreme tire wear in the rear and (2) the suspension lowers further at speed and you do not want the car too low going down the highway (so care must be taken on how much you lower your car).

Non-active air or coil spring cars will require a change in springs to get the desired results. Normally you would have springs that are wound with a higher spring rate in addition to a shorter installed height (to lower the car). The added rate prevents the car's suspension from compressing too far under bump loads and does affect ride quality a little bit. I'm not aware of anyone that has done springs for MS but it is not a difficult task to have Eibach or a similar spring company wind a set of springs for you (if they do not already have something done). I've had springs made for race cars in the past and they are surprisingly affordable.
 

antochat

Pearl White P85
Oct 25, 2012
89
1
Portland OR
The links replace the stock links between the ride height potentiometers and their respective suspension arms. The stock Tesla pieces are of a fixed length while the adjustable ones have ball link ends on a piece of threaded rod (with lock nuts). Changing to the adjustable links allows the owner to change the perceived ride height thus fool the active air suspension to a different ride height. Beware that (1) lowering the car increases negative camber which is tied to extreme tire wear in the rear and (2) the suspension lowers further at speed and you do not want the car too low going down the highway (so care must be taken on how much you lower your car).

Non-active air or coil spring cars will require a change in springs to get the desired results. Normally you would have springs that are wound with a higher spring rate in addition to a shorter installed height (to lower the car). The added rate prevents the car's suspension from compressing too far under bump loads and does affect ride quality a little bit. I'm not aware of anyone that has done springs for MS but it is not a difficult task to have Eibach or a similar spring company wind a set of springs for you (if they do not already have something done). I've had springs made for race cars in the past and they are surprisingly affordable.

Yes, What Lolachampcar said! :wink:
 

lolachampcar

Well-Known Member
Nov 26, 2012
6,189
7,722
WPB Florida
The ball link ends look like the type used on the old webber carb installations on old Porsche and the like. They were just a tad (very small) amount larger than the ball ends on the MS suspension and ride height sensor but this small difference was taken up when the retention pin was installed. Find eight of these rod ends and some stainless all thread and you have the links. If you get that far, I can pull a front and a rear from my car and get you overall dimensions so you have a starting point on length.
 

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