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All Wheel Drive and Electric vehicles...thoughts and ideas for future models.

Discussion in 'Electric Vehicles' started by SteveTheTech, Sep 25, 2010.

  1. SteveTheTech

    SteveTheTech Member

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    #1 SteveTheTech, Sep 25, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 13, 2016
    I was reading a thread in the Model S forum and it was a quite old so I wanted to start another because this does not really fit ideally. The conversation was about the awd option for the future model.

    There was a debate about what type of options should be explored for the new sedan. It seemed like in 09 it was going to be a lower power sub engine on the driven wheels to assist in traction control. I would be very skeptical of any details as they are still hiring engineers for this project and details available now would most likely be altered by production in some way.

    A standard 1 power unit connected by driveshafts to the four wheels. This is an ideal system in an ICE as there is only one path of rotation and a transmission device is required. That has suited us for the last century very well... lets think outside the box a little.

    Torque vectoring has been used by companies like Subaru and Nissan to regulate the amount of power that is sent to each axle or even individual wheels in some units depending on the system. As part of the new federal standards (http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrruletext.aspx?chunkkey=090163348008f2a4) traction control software is already required so it could easily be used adopted to control whatever systems is to be used.

    I was thinking the possibilities of single wheel motors (see the below video) into a Jeep or minivan in the future. Think about the space savings, it could really go either way. You could maximize the interior cabin volume or lift the vehicle for maximum ground clearance could lead to a myriad of options when it comes to potential. An electric H1 type vehicle comes to mind, maximum ground clearance with a modest center of gravity and few rotating parts.

    Using torque vectoring software coupled with four motors would create an all wheel drive system like nothing the world has seen. Instead applying the ABS in subsecond bursts, modulating the amount current being applied to the individual wheel would give the software engineers the ability to basically determine and control the feel of the car depending on the delay and timing of a power transition.

    Maybe I just dream big thought.
    Maybe an electric crossover is Teslas step 4 in global domination.
    If anyone will bring a suitable suv or crossover to market I am betting Tesla will have a pack leader before the pack gets the bugs worked out of their microcars.



    Working the bugs out of EVs will be what makes or break it as the next form of propulsion we use in our vehicles. I feel it is on us (well really you all, I'm just a jr member) as early adopters and enthusiasts to do our little part to bestow some knowledge on the public. As EVs are still almost considered in the sci-fi realm to some people who do not actively follow topics like this.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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  3. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    WhiteStar (Model S) Feature Requests
    (Note, the above pre-dated the actual specs they eventually announced...)
     
  4. SteveTheTech

    SteveTheTech Member

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    Thanks for the great reading. You are a master of the search. It is really interesting to see the progression of this type of technology. We are still not seeing them on the road in mass yet but the time is drawing closer. I see that these threads seem to come in waves, sometimes followed by a news story, sometimes inquiring minds spur debate. In thinking about this topic many have weighted the 4 motor orientation but in 8 years when EVs are a much more firm market segment the technology might actually be to the point where we can all have access to something really interesting.

    One think I noticed while casually looking at these for the last several years in trade journals and online is that they tend to try to pack as much technology into the smallest space possible. The inside diameter of an 18" wheel is commonly ~15-16" depending on the application. Why not try to go small and powerful and leave the suspension on the car. I know the unsprung weight argument usually comes into play right about now, I guess it is all in due time.
     
  5. Jaff

    Jaff Active Member

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    #5 Jaff, Sep 26, 2010
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    I should only be reading this thread as I'm nowhere near qualified to speak here...however, I found the "AWD" on my old Lexus RX 400h and new RX 450h to be well thought out and practical.

    There is no physical linkage between the front & rear axles...my understanding is that there is a second electric motor that engages the rear axle when commanded to do so by the vehicle's computer...I guess it works on the principle that AWD is only required at low speed to ensure enough traction is supplied to keep the vehicle moving forward...if the computer senses a loss of traction in the front axle, it fires up the rear axle to supply added traction.

    It works very smoothly (unlike my old Trailblazer which engaged the front axle with a resounding thunk when engaged by the computer controlled AWD mode)...so smooth, that if you were not watching the hybrid's display screen, you would not really know that the rear axle was engaged.
     
  6. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Yes, the Toyota/Lexus independent rear motor assist (4WD-i) system is elegant, and seamless, but doesn't really provide a lot of offroad capability. It is really designed for modest use such as preventing front wheel slip pulling out of an icy driveway. Toyota recommends against using vehicles like the Highlander Hybrid and Lexus RX for true offroading. LexusHybridBatteryMonitor.jpg Highlander Hybrid rear electric motor
     
  7. Jaff

    Jaff Active Member

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    Ahh, I wasn't even considering off-road capability...just tryin'to keep out of the snowbanks! :redface: :wink:
     
  8. SteveTheTech

    SteveTheTech Member

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    The future will hold some really interesting inventions if and when EVs are the replacement for a certain percentage of ICE vehicles. I personally would love to see the copous amounts of torque electric motors produce to be used to power 18 wheelers. You can move mountains with electrons. Once the battery or storage cell technology is improved to the point where we can either generate or store 100s of megawatthours and have a charging or replacement infrastructure (think saddle tanks) that can keep them operational for longer.

    (electric powered mining shovels)
    mining-electric_shovel.JPE


    The geeks shall take over the earth :p
     

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