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Charging costs past 80%

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by MikeR55, Jan 4, 2020.

  1. MikeR55

    MikeR55 Member

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    So I just got my SR+ and it does drain pretty quick, (guess I should have gotten the LR Awd) and it does take a long time to recharge because I'm on a 110 at home and can upgrade as I am renting this house.

    I've read a lot here about, after 80% it takes a lot longer to charge on a supercharger, is that true with home charging as well? And if it does take longer does that also mean it's taking more electricity to charge once you're past 80%?
     
  2. AEdennis

    AEdennis Active Member

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    I charge to 90% at home... The slow down on a home connection starts later... It's a pretty consistent rate from start to end...
     
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  3. EVDRVN

    EVDRVN Active Member

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    On 120V there is NO taper change since there is no taper at about 1Kw to the pack, 120V is more costly as the charge times are much longer and power is wasted to non-charging parasitic loads. Safe how 120V charging should be on a dedicated 20A circuit, that said one can often convert that to a 240V 20A and use a 6-20 adapter giving you 3,800W vs the 1400w approximately. Huge difference.
     
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  4. MikeR55

    MikeR55 Member

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    I guess I can look into this with the owner and see if there is an electrician that can do this that isn't too much. Because where the dryer is in a 240 line is nowhere near the driveway. About there is a 110 / 120 line at the driveway. I wonder if they can somehow convert like you're saying oh, that would not cost too much
     
  5. MikeR55

    MikeR55 Member

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    Also, from Reading above is there a cost analysis I'll charging on this trickle charge as opposed to getting a faster charger. I'm not worried about time, I work from home so I can wait an extra day. But is it really cost me that much more money to trickle charge
     
  6. AEdennis

    AEdennis Active Member

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    It's all about kWh consumed and how much is wasted while doing that... There were studies done earlier and I think on the Roadster it was 30-40a or something like that... Didn't pay attention to what it is on S, X, or 3...

    I use 240V between 30A and 56A at home...
     
  7. lencap

    lencap Member

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    There is a company that makes an adaptor that allows you to plug into two separate 120 volt outlets simultaneously. If you can do that it will allow you to charge your Tesla much faster - twice the speed of a single outlet or greater - about 6/miles range/hour.

    The video is here:

    The product is Quick 220 for Electric Vehicles, and the link is here: quick220 teslanomics discount

    The cost is about $200 - if it works it's pretty cost effective. I have no experience with this product, but I've watched the video and it seems to do what it claims.
     
  8. MikeR55

    MikeR55 Member

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    Wow very interesting! Thanks!

    Update: They can't be plugged into the same phase- so that won't work- I have 2 pugs outside but they are on the same box
     
  9. EVDRVN

    EVDRVN Active Member

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    If the dryer is electric (not gas) you can use the outlet with a Tesla adapter 14-30 or 10-30. The only way to use the 120v as a 240V is if there are no other outlets or hard wired devices on THAT circuit. then it can be easy if it is 12G wire, just add a breaker and a 6-20 outlet. There is no "splitting" a 240V circuit. Its dedicated by code,
     
  10. Big Dog

    Big Dog Active Member

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    you pay for electricity by the electrons that you use. As others have noted, length of time is only as issue insofar as the car is awake and using electricity for other stuff at that time. Charging the battery also means that it warms itself while charging, so faster charging is less warming is less electrons used.
     
  11. Atari2600

    Atari2600 Active Member

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    They also make a version that connects to 20 amp 120V outlets that can add 15 miles range per hour. I was considering this: Quick 220 Systems: Model A220-20D plus 2 adapter cords (I may still pick one up)

    You need a 6-20 adapter though and if you use 5-15R outlets you have to turn the charging rate down manually from 16 to 12 amps in your car.
     
  12. EVDRVN

    EVDRVN Active Member

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    That requires 2 DEDICATED and separate circuits that are on two sides of the breaker bars which is unlikely in most garages. Anyone that has that may as well just convert to a 6-20 from a single 20A dedicated 120. The Op likely does not even have a dedicated single circuit available let alone two that are on alternate hot legs. Op needs to see if there is a single dedicated circuit and if so see if the owner will allow conversion to a 6-20R.
     
  13. EVDRVN

    EVDRVN Active Member

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    Not really, higher charge rates is higher heat and is more efficient in terms of L2. 1Kw is not going to warm a Tesla pack at all just waste energy.
     
  14. Atari2600

    Atari2600 Active Member

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    You are 100% correct. I was just letting everyone know the 20 amp version is out there, which you can use at 12 amps if needed.
     
  15. EVDRVN

    EVDRVN Active Member

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    a 6-20 is a 240V plug and you can only use it on that outlet and no other plug will work on that outlet. I'm not sure what you would reduce to 12A but a 5-15 will fit in a 5-20 outlet which is not to be confused with a 6-20 which is 240V. Also, I never recommend 16A 120V charging as many 120V 20A circuits are labeled improperly and have 14G wire or 15A breakers and they are almost always compromised. 12A is MUCH safer on a 20A dedicated circuit.
     
  16. gcmak

    gcmak Member

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    When I was at my parents house with only a 110, I would just keep the car charging the entire time - limit to 100% - cause really unless you don't drive the car for a few days straight, it won't hit it...haha. It's not ideal in terms of higher costs at peak hours but we're talking about 110v vs. higher power draw so the difference in actual costs were negligible and still way cheaper than gasoline. I can definitely confirm there's no drop off in charging...but if you can possibly do it, turn off sentry and summon as well as ensure all HVAC items are off in the car. Good luck!
     
  17. Atari2600

    Atari2600 Active Member

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    The 6-20 is the charger side of the device. For the source plug it into 5-20. 120v 20A plugs are not the same as 5-15. You need an adapter to plug it into 5-15 so that can never be an accident. 20A on 12G wire is generally safe unless it’s a long distance. My house uses 12G wire. But I opted to use my dryer plug instead. I do plan on buying this someday.
     
  18. GlassJAw88

    GlassJAw88 Member

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    I’ve been using the 10-30 for months now. It’s been workin great. I’ve been getting 25 miles for hour
     
  19. EVDRVN

    EVDRVN Active Member

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    You are not bing clear and confusing things. A NEMA 6-20P can not work on a 5-20. One is 240V and the other is 120V. You can put a 5-15P into a 5-20R but not the other way around. You should never use an adapter to plug a 5-20P into a 5-15R, this adapter would violate code and is not safe as it relies on the user to always derate the load device where possible. NEMA plugs are designed to only work with the proper rated NEMA outlet. Adapters are often made by companies that violate code and for niche applications and should not be used inappropriately for constant load devices like an EVSE when going from a load that is rated higher than the circuit capacity. The most common issue in residential applications is a 5-20R on a circuit that was 15A and is rated as such. Besides, all EVSE units should be used on a dedicated 20A circuit not a shared circuit and I do not recommend 16A because many circuits are compromised in some manner, 12A charging is fine on a proper 15A circuit but really not the best idea as the extra headroom on a 20A is much safer due to the nature of most 5-15 and 5-20 outlets in the US which are often cheaply made or worn from high cycling.
     
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