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Model Y comfort vs...Honda CR-V

Darmie

Super Member
Supporting Member
Jan 13, 2016
2,219
1,493
Clear Lake TX.
I think if you want performance model y, it is comfortable but a little bit of an afterthought l. I think your going to need to step up to x or s for comfort... crv is a every day car, comfort was probably a primary or secondary consideration..

But you do need to to use those horrible dirty smelly gas stations...

Up to you.
They come to you now.
1627131693991.png

 
One thing that is worth considering: How long are you planning to keep the car? The bottom is going to fall out of the used ICEV market sometime around 2025 or 2026, as the supply of used fleet vehicles becomes entirely electric and EVs become obviously cheaper even to people who don't think about total cost of ownership. So when calculating the cost of getting an ICEV now, unless you're planning to sell within 2 or 3 years, don't count on getting anything for it.

If you're planning to drive it into the ground and thus aren't worried about resale value, be prepared for range anxiety, as gas stations start to go out of business for lack of business.
I typically get a new car every 3 years when the warranty expires. Also, I think what you're describing is 10+ years in the future, if not more.
 

avs007

Member
May 14, 2021
596
460
PacNW
If you're planning to drive it into the ground and thus aren't worried about resale value, be prepared for range anxiety, as gas stations start to go out of business for lack of business.
That's not going to happen for a while. It takes about 25 years for the entire fleet of cars currently on the road to get replaced. Currently EVs only make up something like 3% of new car sales... It's going to take a while for the current fleet of cars on the road to be mostly EVs. So I think it's safe to say that gas stations will be around for a while.
 
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OP, I’d recommend taking your family on test rides in both (or equivalent ICE cars) to be sure. I have a 2020 MY and my wife has a 2019 CR-V, and on a 2.5 hr road trip in the MY with her in the back with our 3 year old son she complained it wasn’t as comfortable as her CR-V.

From the drivers perspective, I’d take the MY over the CR-V on a road trip 9 times out of 10, but I do like having it as a backup especially since it has a spare tire which the MY does not.
 
OP, I’d recommend taking your family on test rides in both (or equivalent ICE cars) to be sure. I have a 2020 MY and my wife has a 2019 CR-V, and on a 2.5 hr road trip in the MY with her in the back with our 3 year old son she complained it wasn’t as comfortable as her CR-V.

From the drivers perspective, I’d take the MY over the CR-V on a road trip 9 times out of 10, but I do like having it as a backup especially since it has a spare tire which the MY does not.
That's my concern. It seems that with the M3, and possibly the MY as well, Tesla prioritized the driver experience at the expense of the other passengers' comfort. I'm not looking for a sports car, I need a family friendly SUV...
Sigh. I doubt the "helpful Honda folks" will let me take the CRV on a road trip test drive...
 
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kenadams

Member
Jul 31, 2020
94
25
DFW
I did test drive the Y. Definitely stiff, though much like the 3, felt more in the back. The question, as others have brought up here, is whether it is the root cause of motion sickness.
Bottom line - would you recommend it as a primary vehicle? Assuming you don't have the crv as a backup?
Our Model Y is our primary vehicle and the CRV is used only when the Y is not available(my spouse uses the Y for her commute). We love taking the Y everywhere. It can fit all our Costco shopping and the sub trunk is very useful.

Some have recommended reducing the tire pressure to soften the ride(but at the cost of efficiency). Something you can do for those long trips when you have rear-seat passengers. Also, check this out: Tesla Model Y Luxury Coilover Suspension Kit by Unplugged Performance

When we got the Y, we didn't trade in the CRV as we wanted to see how the Y would perform for our needs and were planning to use the CRV for those cases where the Y won't fit. But it is almost 10 months now and we are yet to have a situation where we had to take the CRV for this reason.

Hope this helps.
 
Have owned both. We do all our road trips in our Y and love it. Fully family, no one carsick.

are your kids reading or doing tablets? Some people are sensitive to that in a car. Take away the toys and have them enjoy the window for 3 hours, and you may find the motion sickness cured
Yeah I already figured out the tablet thing a while back ago. My wife gets car sick too, and only since we got the M3, without any electronics. It's definitely something about the car that's different.
 

Daekwan

Member
Mar 9, 2021
168
180
DC
Ok, I realize this is kinda crazy comparing the two, but bear with me...
We currently own a 2019 Model 3 with 18" wheels. We live in SoCal. My family, especially those sitting in the rear seats, is finding the ride to be somewhat uncomfortable. I genuinely don't know exactly what the issue is, but anyone sitting in the back will typically get nauseous / motion sickness quite easily. I didn't believe my wife at first until I switched places with her. This has made longer drives (1+ hours) with the M3 unbearable. I know the first thing that comes to mind is driving style, but we are not aggressive drivers and we both have it on "Chill" mode. We weren't driving luxury cars prior to the M3 - I was driving a Hyundai Sonata and my wife drove a Mazda CX-5. However, I'm slowly coming to the realization that the M3 is not a good "family" car for us, due to a combination of comfort, rear legroom and trunk space. Frustrated, I figured I'll just get us a good ole Honda CR-V. So comfortable it screams "road trip" when you hop inside. However, before I retire back to an ICE, I was considering giving the Model Y a chance. Maybe all we really need is an SUV, not a sedan? However, upon some light reading, it seems that the Y rides just as stiff, if not stiffer than the 3, which is concerning.
So my question is, has anyone here had a chance to compare these 2 completely different vehicles? Any other thoughts / comments would be appreciated, but please be nice :)
I'm your huckleberry. I traded my 2018 CRV for a 2021 Model Y in March. Okay.. well I technically bought the Model Y in March and sold the CRV in April. But you get the idea. I was very extensive when comparing the two, to the point where I even parked them side by side while doing the test drive on the Model Y. Also being 6'3" and a Dad of 3-year-old twins, I removed the car seats out the CRV and put them into Y for the test drive. I wanted to make sure there was enough legroom in the rear seat WITH the car seats installed, that it would still be comfortable enough for me to drive.

Comfort - The front seats in the Y are definitely more comfortable. Along with the legroom. The CRV has this weird, bulky console & shifter thing that always was annoying. It impedes legroom because my right knee always was against it. I actually sat in the rear seat of the Y while a few friends test drove my car. It was pretty roomy and comfortable back there. The Y has 5" of additional legroom.. vs the smaller 3.. which is one the main reasons I never bothered with the 3 (I did the same test drive with the 3 and was ridiculously disappointed how cramped the rear seat legroom was). The rear seats also recline slightly in the Y. That said the CRV does have even more legroom, at least in the rear. I would say the CRV has an additional 1-2" of combined legroom (that's measuring front & rear legroom together).

Cargo - CRV has a bigger cargo hold, but the Y has more compartments. The Y has a huge compartment under the floor, it's so big it feels like a spare tire could fit back there. There are also pretty decent size compartments on each side of the huge one, and Tesla offers additional containers for it so they can be sealed off and hidden from the cargo floor. If you don't get the optional 3rd row.. there is an additional compartment underfloor space there where larger flat items can be hidden. Finally, there is the front frunk.. which gives you the 5th compartment for storage. So the CRV has a bigger man area.. but the Y probably has equal spacing considering all the hidden containers.

Ride - The Y ride is stiff. I had a Corvette before the CRV (hey I didn't have kids lol) and the Y's ride is similar to that. There's really no way around this stiff ride except for ordering a $2000 suspension kit and changing the shocks/springs on the vehicle. That said I've grown to like the stiff ride. It's sporty and makes for fun handling maneuvers around corners. The CRV's ride is significantly softer and basically what you'd expect from a Honda.

Both cars offer incredible value.

IMO the Y is the best bang for the buck vehicle Tesla sells. The 3 is too small, sits too low, has too little rear-seat legroom, and is equipped with a trunk.. which makes it less desirable for 'family' use vs the Y. Not only is the Y at least 10% bigger in pretty much all proportions but it sits significantly higher, has a hatchback and true lay flat floor with open cargo area.. which makes it much more useful for haul large items like big boxes, furniture, pets, etc.

The CRV also has an incredible bang for the buck. There is still a long list of features I had on my $27K CRV.. are completely missing from my $50K Model Y. It had CarPlay, Android Auto, rear cross-traffic alerts, real blind-spot monitoring, built-in garage door opener. Add to that Honda's incredible record of great service and reliability.. and it leaves me with a lot of question marks about the long-term experience with Tesla. My CRV was pretty much perfect in every way.. to include its build quality. That said it pretty much sucked to drive. The weak engine & CVT makes the acceleration and sportiness laughable. The CRV felt like an appliance and paying the monthly car note felt like I was paying a utility bill.

At the end of the day of it's certainly your choice. The Y isn't going to drive much differently than the 3. It's going to be stiff and the acceleration/braking will probably still induce motion sickness (if you are already using "Chill mode") as the drivetrain is exactly the same on both vehicles. But the Y is definitely saving me money on gas every week.. and it's definitely appreciating in value.. things the CRV never did. I never would have imagined it.. but it does feel like paying twice as much for the Y.. is going to somehow save me money in the long run lol.

I'll finish by saying the Y is incredible to drive. Its fun, fast, futuristic.. and gets more attention than any vehicle I have ever driven. I feel absolutely blessed to be able to own one. About the only regret I have is that I waited this long to get the Y. That said I couldnt have picked a more perfect time to buy.. as I got in on the lowest price this year buying in March, but was still able to get a Y that has radar, passenger lumbar, refreshed console, double-paned windows, heated steering wheel, etc.
 
I'm your huckleberry. I traded my 2018 CRV for a 2021 Model Y in March. Okay.. well I technically bought the Model Y in March and sold the CRV in April. But you get the idea. I was very extensive when comparing the two, to the point where I even parked them side by side while doing the test drive on the Model Y. Also being 6'3" and a Dad of 3-year-old twins, I removed the car seats out the CRV and put them into Y for the test drive. I wanted to make sure there was enough legroom in the rear seat WITH the car seats installed, that it would still be comfortable enough for me to drive.

Comfort - The front seats in the Y are definitely more comfortable. Along with the legroom. The CRV has this weird, bulky console & shifter thing that always was annoying. It impedes legroom because my right knee always was against it. I actually sat in the rear seat of the Y while a few friends test drove my car. It was pretty roomy and comfortable back there. The Y has 5" of additional legroom.. vs the smaller 3.. which is one the main reasons I never bothered with the 3 (I did the same test drive with the 3 and was ridiculously disappointed how cramped the rear seat legroom was). The rear seats also recline slightly in the Y. That said the CRV does have even more legroom, at least in the rear. I would say the CRV has an additional 1-2" of combined legroom (that's measuring front & rear legroom together).

Cargo - CRV has a bigger cargo hold, but the Y has more compartments. The Y has a huge compartment under the floor, it's so big it feels like a spare tire could fit back there. There are also pretty decent size compartments on each side of the huge one, and Tesla offers additional containers for it so they can be sealed off and hidden from the cargo floor. If you don't get the optional 3rd row.. there is an additional compartment underfloor space there where larger flat items can be hidden. Finally, there is the front frunk.. which gives you the 5th compartment for storage. So the CRV has a bigger man area.. but the Y probably has equal spacing considering all the hidden containers.

Ride - The Y ride is stiff. I had a Corvette before the CRV (hey I didn't have kids lol) and the Y's ride is similar to that. There's really no way around this stiff ride except for ordering a $2000 suspension kit and changing the shocks/springs on the vehicle. That said I've grown to like the stiff ride. It's sporty and makes for fun handling maneuvers around corners. The CRV's ride is significantly softer and basically what you'd expect from a Honda.

Both cars offer incredible value.

IMO the Y is the best bang for the buck vehicle Tesla sells. The 3 is too small, sits too low, has too little rear-seat legroom, and is equipped with a trunk.. which makes it less desirable for 'family' use vs the Y. Not only is the Y at least 10% bigger in pretty much all proportions but it sits significantly higher, has a hatchback and true lay flat floor with open cargo area.. which makes it much more useful for haul large items like big boxes, furniture, pets, etc.

The CRV also has an incredible bang for the buck. There is still a long list of features I had on my $27K CRV.. are completely missing from my $50K Model Y. It had CarPlay, Android Auto, rear cross-traffic alerts, real blind-spot monitoring, built-in garage door opener. Add to that Honda's incredible record of great service and reliability.. and it leaves me with a lot of question marks about the long-term experience with Tesla. My CRV was pretty much perfect in every way.. to include its build quality. That said it pretty much sucked to drive. The weak engine & CVT makes the acceleration and sportiness laughable. The CRV felt like an appliance and paying the monthly car note felt like I was paying a utility bill.

At the end of the day of it's certainly your choice. The Y isn't going to drive much differently than the 3. It's going to be stiff and the acceleration/braking will probably still induce motion sickness (if you are already using "Chill mode") as the drivetrain is exactly the same on both vehicles. But the Y is definitely saving me money on gas every week.. and it's definitely appreciating in value.. things the CRV never did. I never would have imagined it.. but it does feel like paying twice as much for the Y.. is going to somehow save me money in the long run lol.

I'll finish by saying the Y is incredible to drive. Its fun, fast, futuristic.. and gets more attention than any vehicle I have ever driven. I feel absolutely blessed to be able to own one. About the only regret I have is that I waited this long to get the Y. That said I couldnt have picked a more perfect time to buy.. as I got in on the lowest price this year buying in March, but was still able to get a Y that has radar, passenger lumbar, refreshed console, double-paned windows, heated steering wheel, etc.
What an awesome, in depth response. Thank you for taking the time to write this.
 
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Johnny Vector

Member
Jun 21, 2020
297
490
Maryland
That's not going to happen for a while. It takes about 25 years for the entire fleet of cars currently on the road to get replaced. Currently EVs only make up something like 3% of new car sales... It's going to take a while for the current fleet of cars on the road to be mostly EVs. So I think it's safe to say that gas stations will be around for a while.
Yes, there will be gas stations, but a lot fewer. It may take 25 years to replace the entire fleet, but it's not a linear function. Vehicles that get driven more get retired faster, and they're (obviously) the ones that use the most fuel. Even if it takes until 2030 for half the vehicles on the road in the US to be EVs, it'll probably only be 2026 before half the fuel used is electricity. Marginally profitable stations won't be able to survive with their customer base cut in half. By 2030 I expect half the existing gas stations to be gone. Which is fine for your local driving if you live in a decent sized city, or driving on interstates. But start going off the beaten path and you'll want to call ahead to find out whether that one remaining Irving Oil in Millinocket is still in business.
 
Yes, there will be gas stations, but a lot fewer. It may take 25 years to replace the entire fleet, but it's not a linear function. Vehicles that get driven more get retired faster, and they're (obviously) the ones that use the most fuel. Even if it takes until 2030 for half the vehicles on the road in the US to be EVs, it'll probably only be 2026 before half the fuel used is electricity. Marginally profitable stations won't be able to survive with their customer base cut in half. By 2030 I expect half the existing gas stations to be gone. Which is fine for your local driving if you live in a decent sized city, or driving on interstates. But start going off the beaten path and you'll want to call ahead to find out whether that one remaining Irving Oil in Millinocket is still in business.
There is not a single forecast from a credible source that matches these predictions. This is a fantasy at best.

"According to a new report by Bloomberg New Energy Finance, 58% of global passenger vehicle sales in 2040 will come from electric vehicles, yet they will make up less than 33% of all cars on the road"


"according to Ernst & Young LLP (EY), EVs will become more popular than ICE vehicles by 2033, around five years earlier than most other estimates - this prediction was provided by an AI-powered forecasting tool."

You are way off.

Regardless, the majority of customers still purchase ICE vehicles today and that majority will still be pumping them with gas long after I've already traded in my car for a new one.
 
Last edited:

Johnny Vector

Member
Jun 21, 2020
297
490
Maryland
There is not a single forecast from a credible source that matches these predictions. This is a fantasy at best.

"According to a new report by Bloomberg New Energy Finance, 58% of global passenger vehicle sales in 2040 will come from electric vehicles, yet they will make up less than 33% of all cars on the road"


"according to Ernst & Young LLP (EY), EVs will become more popular than ICE vehicles by 2033, around five years earlier than most other estimates - this prediction was provided by an AI-powered forecasting tool."

You are way off.

Regardless, the majority of customers still purchase ICE vehicles today and that majority will still be pumping them with gas long after I've already traded in my car for a new one.
First, we're talking about the US here; that's a worldwide number.

Second, "an AI-powered forecasting tool"? 😂

Those forecasts are worth every bit as much as the EIA forecasts of photovoltaic energy, which, well, just take a look at how those have been working out.

1627307317687.png

Firs
 
First, we're talking about the US here; that's a worldwide number.

Second, "an AI-powered forecasting tool"? 😂

Those forecasts are worth every bit as much as the EIA forecasts of photovoltaic energy, which, well, just take a look at how those have been working out.

View attachment 688306
Firs

That graph is just comparing to a single organization's (very old) forecasts. Even the most optimistic forecasts don't show 50% of vehicles being EVs by 2030.
 
Second, "an AI-powered forecasting tool"? 😂
This may come as a surprise, but AI actually is used in forecasting by many companies:




Crazy, right?
 

Skoomaaddict

New Member
Apr 9, 2021
1
2
Oregon
Ok, I realize this is kinda crazy comparing the two, but bear with me...
We currently own a 2019 Model 3 with 18" wheels. We live in SoCal. My family, especially those sitting in the rear seats, is finding the ride to be somewhat uncomfortable. I genuinely don't know exactly what the issue is, but anyone sitting in the back will typically get nauseous / motion sickness quite easily. I didn't believe my wife at first until I switched places with her. This has made longer drives (1+ hours) with the M3 unbearable. I know the first thing that comes to mind is driving style, but we are not aggressive drivers and we both have it on "Chill" mode. We weren't driving luxury cars prior to the M3 - I was driving a Hyundai Sonata and my wife drove a Mazda CX-5. However, I'm slowly coming to the realization that the M3 is not a good "family" car for us, due to a combination of comfort, rear legroom and trunk space. Frustrated, I figured I'll just get us a good ole Honda CR-V. So comfortable it screams "road trip" when you hop inside. However, before I retire back to an ICE, I was considering giving the Model Y a chance. Maybe all we really need is an SUV, not a sedan? However, upon some light reading, it seems that the Y rides just as stiff, if not stiffer than the 3, which is concerning.
So my question is, has anyone here had a chance to compare these 2 completely different vehicles? Any other thoughts / comments would be appreciated, but please be nice :)
I've taken several road trips in my Model Y 7 seat configuration now, since picking the car up in late March. I live near Portland Oregon and have gone to Vegas once, and to LA three times. I personally love the Model Y and it has just enough trunk space for the biggest of Costco hauls (will fit anything but furniture). The ride is a bit stiff, and older people tend to complain on sharper turns, however, as far as roadtrips go, I will never go back to a non tesla vehicle. Auto pilot is too nice, charging and relaxing, saving money on gas (depending on cost of electricity you'll be getting anywhere from 50mpg to 150mpg equivalent). Passengers love it, although being in the far back two seats, it's really best if they're reserved for kids. Only complaint I've received from friends is the AC being lame at times when the battery cooling requires too much attention.
 

PackMan730

Member
Jul 11, 2021
322
204
Glendale CA
Ok, I realize this is kinda crazy comparing the two, but bear with me...
We currently own a 2019 Model 3 with 18" wheels. We live in SoCal. My family, especially those sitting in the rear seats, is finding the ride to be somewhat uncomfortable. I genuinely don't know exactly what the issue is, but anyone sitting in the back will typically get nauseous / motion sickness quite easily. I didn't believe my wife at first until I switched places with her. This has made longer drives (1+ hours) with the M3 unbearable. I know the first thing that comes to mind is driving style, but we are not aggressive drivers and we both have it on "Chill" mode. We weren't driving luxury cars prior to the M3 - I was driving a Hyundai Sonata and my wife drove a Mazda CX-5. However, I'm slowly coming to the realization that the M3 is not a good "family" car for us, due to a combination of comfort, rear legroom and trunk space. Frustrated, I figured I'll just get us a good ole Honda CR-V. So comfortable it screams "road trip" when you hop inside. However, before I retire back to an ICE, I was considering giving the Model Y a chance. Maybe all we really need is an SUV, not a sedan? However, upon some light reading, it seems that the Y rides just as stiff, if not stiffer than the 3, which is concerning.
So my question is, has anyone here had a chance to compare these 2 completely different vehicles? Any other thoughts / comments would be appreciated, but please be nice :)
You're comparing 2 completely different cars. You might be happier with VW ID or the Hyundai or any other car. They have softer suspension. The model y has harder sportier suspension which people might complain is harder or rougher.
 

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