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PPF coating for Model 3

Not sure about ceramic as I don’t have it and can’t speak for it but xpel PPF is great and they do stand behind their product. I have a full wrap but the panels that have taken the most abuse over 40,000 is the rocker, hood, front bumper and the lower portion of the a pillar. Mudguards do help out the rocker panel PPF a lot.
 
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Reactions: Trevor EV
I have PPF and ceramic coating. Xpel and Suntek are the bigger brands.

I did the front bummer, headlights, fronk, fronts fenders, mirrors, and rocker panels. I regret not doing the rear trunk deck lid where language might scrape.

I think doing the whole car is probably overkill though. Might as well just vinyl wrap it for a fraction of the cost.

The ceramic coating is money. The car stays clean longer, is easier to clean, and is extremely shiny when clean. Make sure you do the wheels too. Ceramic coating isn't a cure-all though. The car still gets dirty in the rain (mainly the rear bumper) and it still takes some elbow grease to get bugs off the front.
 
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I have PPF and ceramic coating. Xpel and Suntek are the bigger brands.

I did the front bummer, headlights, fronk, fronts fenders, mirrors, and rocker panels. I regret not doing the rear trunk deck lid where language might scrape.

I think doing the whole car is probably overkill though. Might as well just vinyl wrap it for a fraction of the cost.

The ceramic coating is money. The car stays clean longer, is easier to clean, and is extremely shiny when clean. Make sure you do the wheels too. Ceramic coating isn't a cure-all though. The car still gets dirty in the rain (mainly the rear bumper) and it still takes some elbow grease to get bugs off the front.
Do you know what the difference is between xpel and Avery Dennison? Are they equal but xpel more famous, or is there an actual difference?
 
Do you know what the difference is between xpel and Avery Dennison? Are they equal but xpel more famous, or is there an actual difference?

I doubt there is much of a difference these days. 10 years ago maybe, as some PPF's yellowed over time.

I knew Avery made vinyl wrap but I didn't know they did PPF until you mentioned it.

I don't quite understand what you mean by "the color did not match the sample or promotion photos/videos." PPF should be competently clear (transparent) and you shouldn't even know it's there if the installation is done well.
 
I doubt there is much of a difference these days. 10 years ago maybe, as some PPF's yellowed over time.

I knew Avery made vinyl wrap but I didn't know they did PPF until you mentioned it.

I don't quite understand what you mean by "the color did not match the sample or promotion photos/videos." PPF should be competently clear (transparent) and you shouldn't even know it's there if the installation is done well.
Ah, this is a case of language barriers. I thought PPF was the same as a vinyl wrap. Now I have to correct a whole lot of earlier posts I've made.

I wrapped my car fully in vinyl from Avery Dennison.
 

joebruin77

Active Member
Dec 23, 2018
1,248
1,165
Encino, CA
I have a full-car Xpel PPF and love it. PPF has self healing properties. If it gets scratched, after 20 minutes in the heat of the sun, the scratches will disappear. PPF provides unsurpassed protection from scratches, rock chips, etc. I highly recommend getting PPF if you plan to keep the car for many years.

Ceramic coatings are sort of like a semi-permanent wax. If you don't want to ever do anything to your car except wash it, then get the PPF plus ceramic coating. I personally enjoy applying sealants and waxes to my car every 3 or 4 months, so for me, instead of a ceramic coating, I use a ceramic-infused spray sealant and a ceramic-infused detail spray. As long as it is applied every 3 or 4 months, it will provide protection similar to that of a ceramic coating.

Although some brave DIY's do both PPF and ceramic coating, I personally would leave their installation to professionals. You can damage the PPF if it is over stretched and it is difficult to get it to fit "just right". And if you make a mistake with a ceramic coating, it is extremely difficult to remove.

My Xpel PPF comes with a 10 year warranty and Xpel has a reputation for really standing behind their products.

BTW, vinyl wraps provide really cool and unique color changes and visual looks. However, they do not provide the same level of protection as PPF. PPF is about 8mm thick. I believe vinyl wraps are about 3mm thick, so less than half that of PPF. And vinyl wraps do not have the self-healing properties that PPF has.
 
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Reactions: Trevor EV
Lots of folks using XPEL and suntek. 3M invented the category and is still a player.

I had 3M installed as my installer had Suntek or 3M. His comment was 3M has a better adhesive so sticks/ stays better when wrapped around edges like a hood. Said Suntek is easier to install than 3M and has a hydrophobic coating - which is why it’s popping up a lot of places.

He said iyou have to be a ‘better’ installer to make 3M look as good as Suntek but if it’s a skilled installer 3M will look equally as good and likely hold the edges for longer.

Also per the post above think you meant 8mil and 3mil not 8mm and 3mm :) point is that PPF is significantly thicker than vinyl wrap.
 
Lots of folks using XPEL and suntek. 3M invented the category and is still a player.

I had 3M installed as my installer had Suntek or 3M. His comment was 3M has a better adhesive so sticks/ stays better when wrapped around edges like a hood. Said Suntek is easier to install than 3M and has a hydrophobic coating - which is why it’s popping up a lot of places.

He said iyou have to be a ‘better’ installer to make 3M look as good as Suntek but if it’s a skilled installer 3M will look equally as good and likely hold the edges for longer.

Also per the post above think you meant 8mil and 3mil not 8mm and 3mm :) point is that PPF is significantly thicker than vinyl wrap.
What about the work involved?
I paid $3k for vinyl, chrome delete and window tint (rear doors and roof), how does that sound?
 
I have a full-car Xpel PPF and love it. PPF has self healing properties. If it gets scratched, after 20 minutes in the heat of the sun, the scratches will disappear. PPF provides unsurpassed protection from scratches, rock chips, etc. I highly recommend getting PPF if you plan to keep the car for many years.

Ceramic coatings are sort of like a semi-permanent wax. If you don't want to ever do anything to your car except wash it, then get the PPF plus ceramic coating. I personally enjoy applying sealants and waxes to my car every 3 or 4 months, so for me, instead of a ceramic coating, I use a ceramic-infused spray sealant and a ceramic-infused detail spray. As long as it is applied every 3 or 4 months, it will provide protection similar to that of a ceramic coating.

Although some brave DIY's do both PPF and ceramic coating, I personally would leave their installation to professionals. You can damage the PPF if it is over stretched and it is difficult to get it to fit "just right". And if you make a mistake with a ceramic coating, it is extremely difficult to remove.

My Xpel PPF comes with a 10 year warranty and Xpel has a reputation for really standing behind their products.

BTW, vinyl wraps provide really cool and unique color changes and visual looks. However, they do not provide the same level of protection as PPF. PPF is about 8mm thick. I believe vinyl wraps are about 3mm thick, so less than half that of PPF. And vinyl wraps do not have the self-healing properties that PPF has.
Thanks Joe. I didn't know that PPF was so thick which is good news. Here in the uk we don't get too many sunny days maybe a couple of days before the weather changes and most likely rains. So its difficult to be able to apply any after market products on a regular basis expect for a few nice weeks of weather. Also I don't have a garage so my car will always be outside.
 

joebruin77

Active Member
Dec 23, 2018
1,248
1,165
Encino, CA
Thanks Joe. I didn't know that PPF was so thick which is good news. Here in the uk we don't get too many sunny days maybe a couple of days before the weather changes and most likely rains. So its difficult to be able to apply any after market products on a regular basis expect for a few nice weeks of weather. Also I don't have a garage so my car will always be outside.

The combination of PPF followed by ceramic coating on top would provide you the easiest year-round protection, especially for a car that is kept outside all the time.

The only other factor is cost. A full car PPF is expensive to begin with (cost me $5,000 here in Los Angeles). A good quality professionally installed ceramic coating would be several hundreds on top of that. So if you use a good quality sealant every 3 or 4 months, you can save a lot of money by forgoing the ceramic coating. But if weather doesn't permit the regular application of a sealant, then the ceramic coating might be your best bet.

You could always try the sealant first and if it just is too labor intensive, then you can always do the ceramic coating later. Getting PPF on the car asap is the most crucial and important step, IMO. I had my PPF installed within days of taking delivery of my P3D.

If you do go the route of a sealant, make sure it is one that is deemed PPF safe. For example, Xpel says not to use any sealants that contain naptha or petroleum distillates. I personally like Opti Coat's Hyper Seal or, if you want a great value, Turtle Wax Seal and Shine. Turtle Wax also just came out with a new ceramic infused sealant, which I plan to try in the near future.
 
The combination of PPF followed by ceramic coating on top would provide you the easiest year-round protection, especially for a car that is kept outside all the time.

The only other factor is cost. A full car PPF is expensive to begin with (cost me $5,000 here in Los Angeles). A good quality professionally installed ceramic coating would be several hundreds on top of that. So if you use a good quality sealant every 3 or 4 months, you can save a lot of money by forgoing the ceramic coating. But if weather doesn't permit the regular application of a sealant, then the ceramic coating might be your best bet.

You could always try the sealant first and if it just is too labor intensive, then you can always do the ceramic coating later. Getting PPF on the car asap is the most crucial and important step, IMO. I had my PPF installed within days of taking delivery of my P3D.

If you do go the route of a sealant, make sure it is one that is deemed PPF safe. For example, Xpel says not to use any sealants that contain naptha or petroleum distillates. I personally like Opti Coat's Hyper Seal or, if you want a great value, Turtle Wax Seal and Shine. Turtle Wax also just came out with a new ceramic infused sealant, which I plan to try in the near future.
Some good advice there again thanks Joe. The quote I've had here for a full PPF wrap is £3500 + 20% VAT That's for Xpel with a 10 year guarantee. The plan is to drive from my collection point straight to the wrap installer.

I might do as you suggest and try a sealant myself after the PPF and as the winter approaches get it professionally applied. Good tip about Naptha or petroleum distillates not being compatible with Xpel
 

Wennfred

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 4, 2019
3,056
2,151
San Diego
SR+ Delivered on 30 March, this picture was taken on 21 Oct, still looks brand new, 2 trips to Vegas and back..... no paint chip and I’ve been hit with all types of crap, got a few windshield nicks to prove it. Xpel PPF all the way man!

97CB8147-C920-41BA-8B27-4CD9665DF869.jpeg
 

Wennfred

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 4, 2019
3,056
2,151
San Diego
What on earth is that front license plate?! Is that a sticker? Is that even legal? Doesn't it have to be the metal one from DMV? Is it above or below the PPF?
Approved by California DMV & Highway Patrol

it’s a License plate wrap (Sticker)

It’s placed over the PPF and you must have the actual front plate in the Trunk and the DMV letter in the Glove Box.

No wrap for the rear, the rear must be the original metal plate.

Tested by the California Highway Patrol of Sacramento

Fred
 

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