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Y performance vs long range 3 handling

Tedkidd

Member
Nice.

I have LR3. Felt the same way about LRY (which I reserved early - $2500) and probably will not exercise. Felt like too much of a step back from my 3, for a lot of money. An extra 10k for performance seemed worth it.

I think if I had a Performance 3 going to the Performance Y, if your priority is driving experience and you didn't care about the extra space or trailer hitch, would be a step down.

In any event, they moved up the delivery a month (scheduled during a snowstorm, and I'm 350 miles from the delivery center) so I decoupled from my vin.

Then they dropped the SRY price and had my colors in stock, so I bit. It won't have FSD, but if/when I decide I want the performance car I suspect there won't be much depreciation...

Still have my 2 reservations. Air suspension and I'm trading whichever car my girlfriend doesn't want...
 

dfwatt

Active Member
Sep 24, 2018
2,965
5,007
FL
I know MPP claims this but I'd be really interested to see independent verification. It smells strongly of sales BS.
I think this is potentially a bit of misrepresentation, or at least a misunderstanding. MPP claim is simply that as cornering loads build up the Model 3 stock suspension engages its bump stops on the outer more loaded tires. This is actually true. This creates Dynamic challenges for the suspension as the outer wheel all of a sudden becomes near solid in terms of suspension travel which jacks up the inner wheel more. You are not on bump stops in the stock Vehicles riding around town. That's just not true. And they never claimed that, not even remotely. Maybe hitting a speed bump at speed perhaps but not driving around normally. As for this being any version of BS from Mountain Pass, I've never heard them say anything that was even remotely BS. They are an outfit that combines great technical knowledge with equal measures of integrity. At this point I trust everything they say. And literally everybody else that has dealt with them would say the same thing.
 
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LionelHutz

Member
Jan 12, 2019
139
106
CA
I think this is potentially a bit of misrepresentation, or at least a misunderstanding. MPP claim is simply that as cornering loads build up the Model 3 stock suspension engages its bump stops on the outer more loaded tires. This is actually true. This creates Dynamic challenges for the suspension as the outer wheel all of a sudden becomes near solid in terms of suspension travel which jacks up the inner wheel more. You are not on bump stops in the stock Vehicles riding around town. That's just not true. And they never claimed that, not even remotely. Maybe hitting a speed bump at speed perhaps but not driving around normally. As for this being any version of BS from Mountain Pass, I've never heard them say anything that was even remotely BS. They are an outfit that combines great technical knowledge with equal measures of integrity. At this point I trust everything they say. And literally everybody else that has dealt with them would say the same thing.

Well, they literally say:

As a result the factory Performance Model Y actually engages the bump rubbers at all times!

I guess that could be interpreted as the car hits the bump stops a lot? But they use a particular choice of words there...
 

dfwatt

Active Member
Sep 24, 2018
2,965
5,007
FL
Well, they literally say:



I guess that could be interpreted as the car hits the bump stops a lot? But they use a particular choice of words there...

Not sure where you took that out of context statement from but the actual description from the coilover page States "Progressive bump rubbers tuned to engage only in the most aggressive compressions while keeping the chassis composed."

More to the point I'm not sure what your angle is on this. You made an original inflammatory statement that what they were saying sounded like sales BS . When you were called on that you come to defend it rather than retracting it. What exactly is your agenda? If you're trying to drum up support for some kind of discrediting of mountain pass performance you're going to be swimming against a lot of current on this forum. To put it bluntly they probably know 50 times more about Teslas than you do and that's a conservative number. So I have to ask you what exactly is your angle on all this? If you're skeptical perhaps you could reach out to them more respectfully and ask them why they're saying what they're saying. I'm sure they'd be happy to tell you and I'm sure it will be well grounded in fact.
 
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LionelHutz

Member
Jan 12, 2019
139
106
CA
Not sure where you took that out of context statement from but the actual description from the coilover page States "Progressive bump rubbers tuned to engage only in the most aggressive compressions while keeping the chassis composed."

More to the point I'm not sure what your angle is on this. You made an original inflammatory statement that what they were saying sounded like sales BS . When you were called on that you come to defend it rather than retracting it. What exactly is your agenda? If you're trying to drum up support for some kind of discrediting of mountain pass performance you're going to be swimming against a lot of current on this forum. To put it bluntly they probably know 50 times more about Teslas than you do and that's a conservative number. So I have to ask you what exactly is your angle on all this? If you're skeptical perhaps you could reach out to them more respectfully and ask them why they're saying what they're saying. I'm sure they'd be happy to tell you and I'm sure it will be well grounded in fact.

Slow your roll, guy. I provided a quote copied and pasted directly from MPP's description of the Model Y suspension. Like you seem to agree, it wouldn't make sense for a stock suspension to be on bump stops all the time. So I'd love to see some evidence of what MPP is talking about when they say (again, copied and pasted from their website):

Additionally, when lowering SUVs which are naturally much higher, there are geometry problems to deal with. In the case of the Model Y, the base vehicle is quite high and for the performance variant, Tesla achieved the lowering by using shorter springs only – while retaining the same bump rubber lengths. As a result the factory Performance Model Y actually engages the bump rubbers at all times! This means you’ll see a huge difference in the ride of our suspension compared to OEM over large compressions and potholes where the OE bump rubber would be really making the ride uncomfortable.

I have zero agenda here. If somebody can show me that the MYP has a defective design in its suspension, I'd genuinely love to know about it.
 

JBT66

Member
Oct 26, 2018
609
353
Arizona
Went from a AWD 3 to a MYP. Oh my it feels nice. Higher but tighter. I have the 21”ubertines on the MYP and had the 18” Aeros with MXM tires so I’m sure that’s some of it.
 

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