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Battery decreased about 20 miles overnight

Peekabooo

Member
Aug 24, 2021
38
12
Hawaii
Parked my car in the street after fully charged and next morning when I check the app, it went down 20 miles, and another 10 miles around 2pm.
I understand that turn on sentry mode will cost some miles but to this much? I got my car on 9/9 so it is pretty new still.
anyone have similar situations?
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,402
4,582
Maryland
Check in the Safety & Security settings if Cabin Overheat Protection is set to ON. You can set Cabin Overheat to No AC or OFF.

Sentry Mode will cause the Model Y to remain awake, use more power than if the Tesla vehicle enters sleep mode. The difference is significant; 25W power drain when in sleep mode versus almost 250W when awake. To minimize this power drain set Sentry Mode to be off at your Home and Work locations.

Also, for daily use Fully Charged should not exceed 90% state of charge of the battery.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
12,568
15,032
Riverside Co. CA
I understand that turn on sentry mode will cost some miles but to this much?

Yes... that much

Sentry mode is 1-2 miles per HOUR of usage. if "overnight was " I got home at 7pm and checked the car at 7am" sure, that could be anywhere from 12-24 miles.
 

Peekabooo

Member
Aug 24, 2021
38
12
Hawaii
Yes... that much

Sentry mode is 1-2 miles per HOUR of usage. if "overnight was " I got home at 7pm and checked the car at 7am" sure, that could be anywhere from 12-24 miles.
That’s about right. I parked around 8pm. No wonder I feel my battery ran out so fast. I didn’t pay close attention to it until recently. I was expecting to charge it once a week since I don’t drive too much, so far have been charging my car 2-3 times a week. Not lazy-friendly 🥲
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,402
4,582
Maryland
Thanks! I did turn the cabin overheat off.
That’s a big difference when it is awake. I guess I will have to manually turn the sentry mode on when I needed. I parked on the street mostly but my neighborhood is fairly safe.
If you are going to park on the street much of the time then look into getting ceramic tint for the glass (some also tint the glass roof although it is already treated to reject UV and IR and is ~5% tint. The greatest benefit would be tinting the windshield, side windows and rear hatch glass.

The "No AC" setting for Cabin Overheat Protection will run the HVAC fan to help keep the cabin from getting too hot while parked. The power drain should be minimal compared to running the AC to keep the cabin from getting too hot.
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
12,568
15,032
Riverside Co. CA
That’s about right. I parked around 8pm. No wonder I feel my battery ran out so fast. I didn’t pay close attention to it until recently. I was expecting to charge it once a week since I don’t drive too much, so far have been charging my car 2-3 times a week. Not lazy-friendly 🥲

This is one of the biggest mistakes potential tesla owners make, in my personal opinion. I personally am not a huge fan of owning one of these cars without either home or work charging (as in, charging where you live, or spend 8 hours working at).

People without home or work charging tend to think some variation of " Oh, I am buying a car with 300 miles range, I only drive 20 miles a day, so I should be able to charge every 10 days or so and have some spare left over" and it absolutely, positively does...no...work at all like that.

Lets use a model Y that has "326 Miles EPA range". EPA range bolded for a reason.

No one is going to drive from 100-0. Its recommended to charge on a regular basis to no more than 90%, and most people are not going to go much below 20% on an EV.

90% of 326 is 293.4 (lets call it 294)
20% of 326 is 65.2 (lets call it 66)

So, right off the bat, a "326 EPA range" model Y has an actual effective range of 294-66, or 228 miles of range.

This does not take into account that the EPA range can only be achieved if one drives like the EPA tests (just like a gas vehicle). On average, if a commute above is 20 real world miles, that commute will take between 20 and 35 miles off the range meter, depending on weather, speed driven, etc.

None of this takes into account energy used while not driving, like sentry mode, or taking lunch in your car and watching netflix or disney plus, etc etc

So the above fictional person, who has a 20 mile commute but no home charging, and who expects "Oh my tesla goes 326 miles, my commute is only 20 miles a day, so 10 days of usage should be 200 miles, so this will be a piece of cake", is in for a rude awaking.

What will actually happen for this person is their 20 mile commute will likely use 30 miles of range on average, and they dont have "326 milees" they have 228 miles, or 7 days ish before their car is at 20% or lower.

Its also VERY common for someone who doesnt have home charging to also want to use sentry mode (because if they had a garage they likely could plug in at home), so there goes another 12-20 miles a night of usage they were not expecting. Call that, conservatively, 15 miles a night, and now the car is using 30 miles driving + 15 miles a night, or 45 miles a day, for a "I need to refill the battery" time of 5 days, when they were expecting on a conservative basis to do it every 10 days and have plenty left over.

Change the math for whatever your actual commute is. If you were expecting 7 days, its probably more like 3.

When I see people ask in the model 3 subform "should I buy this car if I dont have home charging" I usually say "only if you have some reason other than convenience for buying the car".

Home charging (or work) changes all of that, because it simply doesnt matter how much power you use then, because you dont go anywhere to "fill up". That 20 miles a day driven uses 30 miles a day, but so what, its not even noticed.

I am just laying out the "real world" usage for "not charging at home", and how many miles people use. This is not a "tesla" issue, really, its an "EPA range" issue and the fact that people look at the miles and forget that they are not going from 100-0.
 
Last edited:

Peekabooo

Member
Aug 24, 2021
38
12
Hawaii
If you are going to park on the street much of the time then look into getting ceramic tint for the glass (some also tint the glass roof although it is already treated to reject UV and IR and is ~5% tint. The greatest benefit would be tinting the windshield, side windows and rear hatch glass.

The "No AC" setting for Cabin Overheat Protection will run the HVAC fan to help keep the cabin from getting too hot while parked. The power drain should be minimal compared to running the AC to keep the cabin from getting too hot.
I was actually going to look up about tinting and ceramic coating. I think I will be parking uncovered for most of the time. I didn’t plan to tint my glass roof. I bought a cover looking thing for the that because it is really hot (I lived in Hawaii so sunny day almost whole year). Do you think I still need to tint the glass roof if that’s the case?

Appreciate your information and suggestions 🙏🏻
 

Peekabooo

Member
Aug 24, 2021
38
12
Hawaii
This is one of the biggest mistakes potential tesla owners make, in my personal opinion. I personally am not a huge fan of owning one of these cars without either home or work charging (as in, charging where you live, or spend 8 hours working at).

People without home or work charging tend to think some variation of " Oh, I am buying a car with 300 miles range, I only drive 20 miles a day, so I should be able to charge every 10 days or so and have some spare left over" and it absolutely, positively does...no...work at all like that.

Lets use a model Y that has "326 Miles EPA range". EPA range bolded for a reason.

No one is going to drive from 100-0. Its recommended to charge on a regular basis to no more than 90%, and most people are not going to go much below 20% on an EV.

90% of 326 is 293.4 (lets call it 294)
20% of 326 is 65.2 (lets call it 66)

So, right off the bat, a "326 EPA range" model Y has an actual effective range of 294-66, or 228 miles of range.

This does not take into account that the EPA range can only be achieved if one drives like the EPA tests (just like a gas vehicle). On average, if a commute above is 20 real world miles, that commute will take between 20 and 35 miles off the range meter, depending on weather, speed driven, etc.

None of this takes into account energy used while not driving, like sentry mode, or taking lunch in your car and watching netflix or disney plus, etc etc

So the above fictional person, who has a 20 mile commute but no home charging, and who expects "Oh my tesla goes 326 miles, my commute is only 20 miles a day, so 10 days of usage should be 200 miles, so this will be a piece of cake", is in for a rude awaking.

What will actually happen for this person is their 20 mile commute will likely use 30 miles of range on average, and they dont have "326 milees" they have 228 miles, or 7 days ish before their car is at 20% or lower.

Its also VERY common for someone who doesnt have home charging to also want to use sentry mode (because if they had a garage they likely could plug in at home), so there goes another 12-20 miles a night of usage they were not expecting. Call that, conservatively, 15 miles a night, and now the car is using 30 miles driving + 15 miles a night, or 45 miles a day, for a "I need to refill the battery" time of 5 days, when they were expecting on a conservative basis to do it every 10 days and have plenty left over.

When I see people ask in the model 3 subform "should I buy this car if I dont have home charging" I usually say "only if you have some reason other than convenience for buying the car".

Home charging (or work) changes all of that, because it simply doesnt matter how much power you use then, because you dont go anywhere to "fill up". That 20 miles a day driven uses 30 miles a day, but so what, its not even noticed.

I am just laying out the "real world" usage for "not charging at home", and how many miles people use. This is not a "tesla" issue, really, its an "EPA range" issue and the fact that people look at the miles and forget that they are not going from 100-0.
I have a home charge for 220V but my family have multiple cars so I didn’t want to use the spot just for my car only. AND that was exactly what I was thinking when buying 😂 my case is more flexible I guess. I totally agree with you, I wouldn’t consider buying EV if I don’t have home charge. Charging during work would be ideal but home charge is essential for me.
I have my car set on 90%, and I started to realized the 290+ mile isn’t the same as gas car. My solution will just be charging more often when I can.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,402
4,582
Maryland
I was actually going to look up about tinting and ceramic coating. I think I will be parking uncovered for most of the time. I didn’t plan to tint my glass roof. I bought a cover looking thing for the that because it is really hot (I lived in Hawaii so sunny day almost whole year). Do you think I still need to tint the glass roof if that’s the case?

Appreciate your information and suggestions 🙏🏻
I have an inside sun shade for the glass roof that helps with the intensity of the sun's rays but the cabin still gets hot (perhaps not as quickly.) I don't have experience with an outside car cover. Do you have a link or a photo of the cover you plan to use? Is the interior of your Model Y black or white?

There are some extensive threads on tinting the glass of the Model Y, with and without adding additional tint to the glass roof (clearly this is the most expensive option when tinting the glass.) Tinting auto glass is extremely popular in Florida, Texas, Nevada, Arizona and southern California. I have not added tint to my Model Y or any other vehicle I have owned. I park my Model Y in my home garage or underground garage whenever possible. With past vehicles I used a sun shade for the windshield when parking outside in summer.

You can experiment with Cabin Overheat Protection using the No AC mode, see how hot the cabin gets when you turn on the climate control from the app. It takes less than 10 minutes to cool down the passenger cabin even when the temperature is above 105F.

I would take care not to leave any container in the vehicle that might leak if it became too warm. Sunscreen products, also hand sanitizer that gets onto the seats will damage the polyurethane fabric (the vegan leather seat covering) used in the Tesla Model Y.
 
Last edited:

Peekabooo

Member
Aug 24, 2021
38
12
Hawaii
I have an inside sun shade for the glass roof that helps with the intensity of the sun's rays but the cabin still gets hot (perhaps not as quickly.) I don't have experience with an outside car cover. Do you have a link or a photo of the cover you plan to use? Is the interior of your Model Y black or white?

There are some extensive threads on tinting the glass of the Model Y, with and without adding additional tint to the glass roof (clearly this is the most expensive option when tinting the glass.) Tinting auto glass is extremely popular in Florida, Texas, Nevada, Arizona and southern California. I have not added tint to my Model Y or any other vehicle I have owned. I park my Model Y in my home garage or underground garage whenever possible. With past vehicles I used a sun shade for the windshield when parking outside in summer.

You can experiment with Cabin Overheat Protection using the No AC mode, see how hot the cabin gets when you turn on the climate control from the app. It takes less than 10 minutes to cool down the passenger cabin even when the temperature is above 105F.

I would take care not to leave any container in the vehicle that might leak if it became too warm. Sunscreen products, also hand sanitizer that gets onto the seats will damage the polyurethane fabric (the vegan leather seat covering) used in the Tesla Model Y.
Yeah same as yours, the interior sun shade for the glass roof. I could imagine the price would be much higher as that’s the biggest glass of the whole car. I will probably go with tinting all glasses except the roof, along with the windshield sun shade and roof sun shade. Hope this will help to lower the heat.
I never thought about the hand sanitizer or the sunscreen will damage the seats. Really don’t want to get seat cover but might have to.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,402
4,582
Maryland
Yeah same as yours, the interior sun shade for the glass roof. I could imagine the price would be much higher as that’s the biggest glass of the whole car. I will probably go with tinting all glasses except the roof, along with the windshield sun shade and roof sun shade. Hope this will help to lower the heat.
I never thought about the hand sanitizer or the sunscreen will damage the seats. Really don’t want to get seat cover but might have to.
Also can damage the steering wheel; make sure you hands are dry when you grip the wheel if you use hand sanitizer. Keep a packet of unscented baby wipes in the vehicle for cleaning up any spills promptly.

My Model Y sunshade for the glass roof came with a second reflective layer (I've never used it.) That additional layer fully blocks the sun.

There are several threads on the Model Y forums regarding sun shades. There is one sun shade that had rigid sections that get installed. That sun shade does not droop and may perform better at keeping out the heat.
 
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Peekabooo

Member
Aug 24, 2021
38
12
Hawaii
Also can damage the steering wheel; make sure you hands are dry when you grip the wheel if you use hand sanitizer. Keep a packet of unscented baby wipes in the vehicle for cleaning up any spills promptly.

My Model Y sunshade for the glass roof came with a second reflective layer (I've never used it.) That additional layer fully blocks the sun.

There are several threads on the Model Y forums regarding sun shades. There is one sun shade that had rigid sections that get installed. That sun shade does not droop and may perform better at keeping out the heat.
I touch it right after I use the hand sanitizer, bad habit. I kept alcohol wipes in my car. Also not a good idea sounds like. Lol. Thanks for the heads up and tips!
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,402
4,582
Maryland
I touch it right after I use the hand sanitizer, bad habit. I kept alcohol wipes in my car. Also not a good idea sounds like. Lol. Thanks for the heads up and tips!
Isopropyl alcohol wipes are ok, actually Isopropyl alcohol on a clean microfiber cloth is one of the few recommended cleaning methods for removing stubborn stains. It is the Ethyl alcohol in hand sanitizer that can damage the seat covers and the steering wheel. The alcohol in hand sanitizer evaporates in less than a minute when you rub your hands together. The real risk is when a bottle of sanitizer leaks and you don't wipe this up right away. Sun screen, sun block contains chemicals that will damage the seating. Definitely clean any vehicle surface that may have been in contact with sun screen or hair products such as gels using the baby wipes.

https://intranet.ultrafabricsinc.com/img/pages/care_and_cleaning/CleaningInstructions.pdf
 

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