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Ceramic Coat a new Model 3?

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by Glamisduner, Jul 12, 2018.

  1. Glamisduner

    Glamisduner Member

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    I'm generally happy with paint on new cars upon delivery. In fact I find myself tapering off on car after after the first couple years of ownership (once it has it's door dings and rock chips, and scratches because they make me sad every time I detail). Do I still need to clay bar and polish the car before ceramic coating it myself (I have never done this but I was thinking to drive the car home and immediately do this to it).

    I know... Paint correction is best, but if I don't care can I just wash then apply the ceramic coating? I'm more after protecting the paint than perfection.
     
  2. chronopc

    chronopc Active Member

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    If you want protection you should wrap it.
     
  3. cbutters

    cbutters Member

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    #3 cbutters, Jul 12, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
    Long post incoming... to answer your question succinctly, you don't have to clay bar your car if it doesn't need it, Run your fingertips along the paint and see if you feel foreign objects or dragging in the paint; there may be sections that do need to be claybar-ed, there may be areas that don't.

    At the very least though; wash the car immaculately and use a solution of water and isopropyl alcohol to remove any polish, wax or oils. best, long-lasting results with ceramic coating come when you prepare the surface properly.


    When I get my brand new 3, I don't plan on doing "paint correction" either unless there are some really messed up scratches.

    Here is my DIY plan for after delivery (might have to take a day or two off work to do this):

    A) After picking up car testing AC / braking / acceleration and road noise, drive car immediately home.
    B) Wash car with pressure sprayer and some pink ph balanced soap. Move car to shaded protected garage.
    C) Spot test for areas that need claybar. Perform claybar to remove any micro objects, iron, foreign materials. (My X actually had quite a bit of yellow bits in the clearcoat tha thad to be claybar-ed out.)
    D) Meticulously spray down and wipe each surface with 25% Isopropyl Alcohol / 75% water solution, (use a new high quality microfiber towel.)
    E) Install PPF on hood, headlamps, front bumper, side mirrors, fenders and rear trunk lip.
    F) Areas that won't be covered with PPF (roof, doors, etc); begin to apply CQUK 3.0; wipe off; repeat for 2 coats
    F) Let PPF dry overnight, check for bubbles and areas that need to be laid down flat.
    G) Assuming PPF is dry and no bubbles; Apply CQUK 3.0 to PPF surface.
    H) Apply CQ DLUX to any black trim areas and underside of car.
    I) Jack up Model 3 (!! use special jackpad !!!)
    J) Remove each wheel one by one using jack; clean with alcohol solution and apply CQ DLUX to outside and inside of the wheel.
    K) While each tire is off; also apply CQ DLUX to the paint on the caliper behind each tire.
    L) Place car in sun (assuming no chance of rain) for 24 hours to cure. (avoid water like the plague to avoid any water spots in the first week.)
    M) At some point I will also apply CQUK to the interior door sills, but I know I'll be burnt out on this, so I'll break that part out to let me get the most protective elements in place.
    N) Apply tint.... but that is going to be a whole other can of worms.
     
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  4. chronopc

    chronopc Active Member

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    Can you come over and do this to my car too?
     
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  5. cbutters

    cbutters Member

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    If you lived in Utah, I'd say come on over and we can have a party getting it done. :)

    The reason I'm passionate about getting it done early, is when we took delivery of our X, I procrastinated about 8,000 miles to long, and then when I finally got the PPF installed I basically locked in 6-7 of paint chips and scratches that get to annoy me for the rest of the car's useful life.
     
  6. Glamisduner

    Glamisduner Member

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    Ok so your suggesting I somehow find a PPF installer for the front bumper before anything else? I'm not wrapping my whole car if at all...

    But this needs to be done before the CQUK if I am going to do it?

    I'm starting to think just using regular synthetic wax on the car might make more sense for me....
     
  7. turtlesz

    turtlesz Member

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    I did it myself on my white Model 3. Very satisfied with the results and wasn't too hard to do. I drove car home and was satisfied with the paint quality and didn't even wash the car. I sprayed each panel with isopropyl alcohol then applied a layer of cquartz. Made a thread about it a few months ago asking similar question and added a pic. Thinking about ceramic coating my Model 3 myself the day I pickup, is this crazy?
     
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  8. chronopc

    chronopc Active Member

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    I'm willing to come to you. :)
     
  9. SW2Fiddler

    SW2Fiddler It refuels itself. On wind power. While I sleep.

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    CQuartz right on the paint is a wonderful thing in my experience. I didn't add PPF at all... I enjoy the ease of cleaning the CQuartz provides. Often I just run her thru the rain and that's enough.

    I don't understand why one would put a ceramic coating OVER a (removable) film... But I totally understand why a DEALER would recommend it ($$)!
     
  10. Glamisduner

    Glamisduner Member

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    I seem to have replied to that thread. But if you ceramic coat first, then you cant install the PPF?

    I don't know that I will actually re-ceramic coat every 2 year either. It might be a one time thing due to how long it takes.
     
  11. cbutters

    cbutters Member

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    I'll let you know my delivery date once I get it. I can give you a list of the same items I purchased to come prepared. I've got all the tools, sprays, spray bottles, torque wrenches, jacks, jackpads, etc.. but you'd have to mostly do your own work and I could only mostly show you how I'm doing my own. No promises as I'm no expert or professional I've only applied PPF once before, and done the ceramic coating on my X and a BMW i3 and that's about it.

    Most films recommend some sort of sealer after installation, will fill in pores and reduce chances of fading/ discoloration. Also it gives it a more glossy look.

    I've read if you ceramic coat first, installation can be much more difficult since the adhesive might not stick as well and the slip solution falls right off so you have problems that way. I've also read a few conflicting posts that some installers ceramic coat first for extra sheen underneath.... I'm not sure who is right, it could also depend on which ceramic coatings you use...
     
  12. Glamisduner

    Glamisduner Member

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    DO you have a link to the jackpads and other things?
     
  13. cbutters

    cbutters Member

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    #13 cbutters, Jul 12, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
    CQUK 3.0
    https://amzn.to/2NMdrBR

    CQuartz DLUX
    https://amzn.to/2NNkxGk

    Jack Pads
    Tesla Model 3 Jack Pad Adapter Lift Point Pad For Tire Service Tire Change Tool | eBay

    DIY PPF Wraps (XPEL and Scotchgard Pro options available)
    2018

    Claybar (any claybar kit should be good, its supposedly all mostly the same stuff.)
    https://amzn.to/2KROnLH

    Carpro Waterless wash & Claybar Lubricant (good for claybaring and quick touchless washes after your ceramic coating is on.... compatible with ceramic coats.)
    https://amzn.to/2LaX7bT

    Pressurized Spray bottle (get 1 for alchohol solution, 1 for slip solution, 1 for waterless wash/claybar)
    https://amzn.to/2usDPYr

    Pink ph Balanced Car wash (Good for washing any car, but most importantly its compatible and good for deeper washes with ceramic coatings as well.)
    https://amzn.to/2LecZun

    Of course you need high quality microfiber towels as well to accomplish all of this I like a high quality "borderless blonde" style microfiber cloth. They are plush, gentle and no edges for safer cleaning.
    https://amzn.to/2upPeIs
     
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  14. AngryCPA

    AngryCPA Member

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    Check out this thread, lots of good info.

    Tesla Model 3 | DIY Ceramic Coating

    I personally went with 2 coats of CQuartz UK 3.0. My paint was in decent condition so i skipped the orbital and did a hand polish instead. My car is silver so scratches are much more difficult to see. I also added Xpel headlight PPF since pitted headlights drive me crazy (prior to coating). I would probably pick up some Carpro Reload as well to protect your paint while the CQuartz is curing and to apply after maintenance washes which will extend the life of your coating.

    http://a.co/eLjEP9i
     
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  15. Glamisduner

    Glamisduner Member

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    Do I really need 3 pressurized spray bottles? Or can I get by with one?
    Also, what is SLIP solution?

    I have been using this carwash on my current car. http://www.meguiars.com/en/automotive/products/g17748-ultimate-wash-wax/
    I should stop using it if I ceramic coat the model 3?


    Finally I have never installed PPF, are those ebay kits for the bumper something I will probably be able to do myself with some care, or are they something I will probably need to bring to a shop to install?
     
  16. cbutters

    cbutters Member

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    You need 2 bottles if you will be applying PPF yourself. Slip solution is distilled water with some johnsons baby shampoo that lets the film be applied easier without sticking hard to the paint while you are trying to position the film. Then you use the alchohol solution as a "tack" solution which makes the PPF stickier once you get key areas lined up. If you ceramic coat, you probably don't want a wash & wax, in fact you probably wont wan't a wax at all. You will want something like Carpro Reload.
     
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  17. SW2Fiddler

    SW2Fiddler It refuels itself. On wind power. While I sleep.

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    Squirrels have been flinging pine sap towards my S85 while they harvest pine nuts. That stuff has volatiles and would quickly eat and discolor bare paint, but CQuartz acts like the glass does - the pine sap can be wiped off without leaving any record behind. If it dries, it scrapes off cleanly with a fingernail.

    To say a ceramic coating does not protect paint is demonstrably false. Video can be taken if anyone wants proof proof! That pine sap is AWFUL
     
  18. bradl

    bradl Member

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    As a cheapskate I'm sorry to hear that ceramic helps :) My car will (must) be parked under a 100+ foot Douglas fir that rains down sap like you would not believe. I'm planning on a cover (what a pain) but I will get sap at some point between the time I pull in and the time it takes to get the cover on. My white jeep looks like a pox victim.
     
  19. sroh

    sroh Member

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    Wow, cbutters! Man with a plan for sure!

    You want to install the ppf first, then ceramic coating over the entire car, including over the ppf.

    Cquartz UK 3.0 is very easy to DIY.
     
  20. novox77

    novox77 1.21 Gigawatts

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    When I got the Model S last October, I was just entering New England crappy weather season, which means sand and salt on the roads and very dirty cars. At that time I researched DIY exterior detailing and learned about the wonders of rinseless car washing. And in my youtube surfing I then encountered ceramic coatings. And shortly after that, clay bar.

    Turns out, clay barring the car is not hard at all. It used to intimidate me cause I didn't know how it worked. It's ridiculously simple to do and really satisfying to feel the surface of the car return to glassy smoothness with just a few passes of the clay.

    After I clay barred the car, I did the DIY version of CQuartz. I didn't even buff the clearcoat because I really don't care about showroom quality paint. I just want to be able to go into a rinseless car wash bay and have all the sh*t magically rinse off. And the CQuartz did just that. It makes it super easy to get your car clean with a powerwash.

    For Model 3, I thought about immediately applying CQuartz, but I figured the factory wax was still good, so I was gonna let that fade a bit, then do a claybar (which strips off any remaining wax and anything new embedded), then Cquartz. I still have a lot of time before dirty car season returns.
     

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