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Energy Used - Ontario Winter

Discussion in 'Canada' started by mcfadyena, Jan 10, 2014.

  1. mcfadyena

    mcfadyena Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Campbellford, Ontario
    Hey All,
    New driver - but have put over 3000km on the car since pickup 3 weeks ago.

    My average energy use is sitting at 260 w/km. It's been cold, but I've done everything I can to ensure I mitigate the cold temperatures and conserve energy. Garage overnight, finish charge just before leaving, heat cabin before I go while plugged in. I drive about 115 on the 401 for my 140 km journey to work, same on the way home. Heat is on "range" mode. But it's really, really cold due to the drafts in the windows (fixing tomorrow). When I arrive home (after a full charge each day), I'm close to 40 km rated range left, one day I arrived at 0.

    I tried to drop my driving down to 110 km.

    Is this the same average other Ontario travellers are seeing? I hate having to do a range charge each day for the 280 km round trip, but I need to make it there and back successfully :)

    Regardless - I love my car!

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

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    Toronto, ON
    Even though I'm in Canada, I keep my car in US units. It's just a personal preference. 260 Wh/km equals about 418 Wh/mi which is actually not bad for this weather. I have a round-trip commute of about 90 miles (145 km) and it is mostly freeway. I think I'm seeing numbers a bit north of 418 Wh/mi whereas last summer I could easily achieve 300 Wh/mi on the same trip.

    On the weekends when I'm just doing short trips in town, I'll get numbers around 800 Wh/mi in the cold between charges. This is because the shorter trips means the battery keeps having to be re-heated after it sits and cools down.

    The best thing you can do is slow down. I know 100 km/h isn't easy on the 401, but if you stay in the right lane it is doable.
     
  3. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    Yeah that's pretty typical. You can expect to get about 80% of your nominal range, assuming preheating etc. If the pack heater is running while driving it can be a lot worse.
     
  4. RAM_Eh

    RAM_Eh Member

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    Location:
    Toronto ON
    I have had mine 3 weeks now and I am averaging 287 w/km, but I do a lot of short trips.
     
  5. mcfadyena

    mcfadyena Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks for the feedback!
    Had a much better drive today. It's a bit warmer, and I slowed down a tad (115).
    Averaged 237 on the way home.
     
  6. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    Draft a truck 1 secoond back and you'll get 200 even in extreme cold.
     
  7. mcfadyena

    mcfadyena Member

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    Hmmmm. Never tried that. But I will! So - would be driving about 105? And about how far back is 1 second?

     
  8. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    Yes, 105, but if you can find a greyhound they are much faster. Just keep a distance you feel comfortable with.
     
  9. seanmccutchan

    seanmccutchan Member

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    Location:
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    @mcfadyena - I posted some results of an experiment I ran over the the New England forum (Effects of Winter on Energy Consumption). I tried to put some number to what we've been experiencing.
     
  10. inottawa

    inottawa Member

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    Location:
    Ottawa, ON, Canada
    I have to say the winter has been quite brutal on my range (amongst other things). I usually even out around 370-380 Wh/km. I think this car is meant for people that can park the car inside a garage out of the chilling overnight winds. My car doesn't typically see indoors, unless I'm going through a car wash, which hasn't been good with these -35 days.

    IMG_1193.jpg

    I usually start the cabin heat about an hour before I leave in the morning and sometimes I still get a message that regen is disabled. When I leave from work (open Vinci parking lot with no 110V), most of my ride home I don't have regen braking (even with range mode off and the battery heating). I usually get about 1/3 of my rated and that's what I bank on when planning out a day. I've been caught a couple times when having to run around a lot during the day with stops just long enough to have the battery chill again.

    I've learned to work around the range issue. I also pull out my trusty charge port opener (bank card) when I get home. I'm definitely looking forward to my next place with a garage :)
     
  11. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    After an hour's preheating using the App you should have about 50% of normal regen - not completely disabled. It only preheats the pack if you use the App (or VisibleTesla) to remote warm the cabin, though.

    Make sure the "Range Mode" is not turned on, as this limits pack heating even while plugged in - very counterproductive.
     
  12. notailpipe2112

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    When I'm on the 401 rolling in sub 0 temperatures my challenge to myself is to try to keep my car (a 60) in the range of 200-210 w/km. To me that is the magic number to have some confidence that any range degradation related to cold temperature won't be too sudden. I use my car mostly on the highway and have done quite a bit of driving this winter. In December, I had an experience letting the magic number get up to 250-280 w/km as a result of the triple threat of extreme cold (-18), snow and wind...and this was with me still doing my standby trick of lowering my speed right down into the 60-70 km range. It was frustrating because of my own self-imposed expectations, based on past highway experiences with the car. What I mean by that is that, until this experience, I had found that I could always get back to my magic 200-210 w/km by simply lowering my speed almost no matter what it was like outside. So, in effect, I kept 'hoping' the car would get back down to 210 from being up in the 250-280 range and it just never did. The end result had me rolling into an emergency charge stop with only 2 km charge left. Basically, it was all my fault, and I was dreaming, but expectations can be hard to break...and I have learned from it.
     
  13. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    There's a tradeoff point when you lower your speed, where the fixed power required to operate the car - including heat - is equal to the drive train power. Below that speed driving slower takes more power, not less. Under mild conditions that's around 40 kph.

    When you turn the cabin heat on, that tradeoff point is higher by however many kilowatts your heater is currently taking. In extreme temperature pack heating may also be a factor. This means the optimum speed will be higher. Slowing down becomes much less effective as you approach that balance point.

    The upshot is that reducing speed is highly effective at extending range, but if you're in extreme conditions you may also have to switch off the cabin heat to get the full benefit of slowing down. Crank the seat heater up as much as you can stand, of course.
     
  14. CanuckS#69

    CanuckS#69 Member

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    What Doug said. I find that in extreme conditions where everyone is forced under 60kph, the pack heater is on full time and you never get full regen back. Speeding up to 70-80kph allows the motor heat to offset the pack heating needs. Range dies in a hurry when the cabin and pack heaters are both on and you are moving slowly, despite the efficiency of the slower speed. I can still make all of my ordinary trips on an 85 in -25c, but I can't do two long runs in one day if both involve cold soak, whereas in warmer weather both in the same day are easy.
     
  15. mcfadyena

    mcfadyena Member

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    Thanks!
     

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