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Highland Range

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But, is it accurate for what it is TRYING to represent?
That depends on what you mean by what it is trying to represent.
If you mean how many miles you can actually drive, it is not very accurate, and way too optimistic.
But as a representation of how much energy is in the battery, it is as accurate as any other metric, (EPA, etc.), as long as you know the conversion constant in Wh/mile that it uses.
 
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What indicated range are people getting on the highland after charging?

My 1 day old LR is currently showing 203 miles at 67%. Multiple that up and it would be 303 miles at 100%. That’s a far cry from the advertised 390 miles.
I suspect there is some calibration to be done by the BMS before the quoted figure settles down, however meaningless it may be.

My 2021 LR shows 245 miles @ 75% which would give about 327 at 100%. Originally showed 335 miles at 100% when I picked it up 16,000 miles back.
 
That depends on what you mean by what it is trying to represent.
If you mean how many miles you can actually drive, it is not very accurate, and way too optimistic.
But as a representation of how much energy is in the battery, it is as accurate as any other metric, (EPA, etc.), as long as you know the conversion constant in Wh/mile that it uses.
Well I simply mean that WLTP as a measurement set, is quite different than the USA EPA measurement set… and that WLTP is higher is an indication of much lower speeds, more time at those lower speeds. It’s not just a European or different implementation of the EPA test suite. so, for what IT represents, is it off too? It’s certainly going to be higher, but then driving in Europe is different than in the USA as far as miles travelled on what type of highways, city speed limits, etc..
 
Team,
For a while now I'm wondering why my range is with full battery always is 237-250mi?
This is my second tesla and on both the range stays the same:

- Model Y RWD 2023 - 19" - 4.154 lb - EPA 246 mi: range in winter and summer between 237-250mi
- Model 3 RWD 2024 - 19" - 3.827 lb - EPA 272 mi: range in winter and summer between 237-250mi

Both cars 57.5 kWh usable capacity LFP battery, Sentry mode on except at home, # mi/year approx. 6.500 mi
Model 3: 327 pounds lighter (!!) and better aerodynamics.
Driving behavior: pretty calm and relaxed
FYI: Teslamate efficiency report: Jan'24 80% and Jun'24 115% (think because of the temperature)

How could it be that these (quite) different cars report the same range where I would expect to see a big improvement with the M3 Highland?
 
How could it be that these (quite) different cars report the same range where I would expect to see a big improvement with the M3 Highland?
Displayed range on the screen is based on the official USA EPA range for specific model/year of the car, minus any battery degradation. Since the official EPA range for the new Model 3 highland is the same as the older Model 3, the range on the screen is the same.

Contrary to popular belief, displayed range on screen does not depend on "driving habits". You real-world range - how far you can drive in your car, will obviously depend on how you drive it. If you are curious about your real-world efficiency/range, you can keep track of your Wh/mi or Wh/km statistics.
 
Display is always EPA. And not even that as of late.

Anyway it does not matter. Energy and efficiency.

Miles are units of energy. You just have to determine the energy content per mile which is different for every vehicle model. Or just determine your total energy and ignore that detail.
So the way you drive the car does not affect the numbers on the screen? But what about the typography? Lots of upphills, e.g. or a lot of downhill?
 
But when it calculates Trip it must take into account the topography?
Both are available in the car. Actually three things. The little number on the battery gauge is supposed to be a fuel gauge though. It is always displaying, even when there is no route plotted and therefore no hypothetical topography. So it just shows the amount of energy, scaled by a conversion constant.

But in the Energy app on the screen, Trips tab, when you choose a route for the navigation, yes, it does a lot, and it accounts for rise and fall of elevation and topography, approximate speed limits along the route, and will even continually update in real time including all of the energy consumption from your heating and cooling. That will show the projection along your chosen route, and what it estimates you will use up and what you will have remaining.

And the third thing is that in the other tab of the Energy app is more of a general projection, even if you don't have any route plotted. That will show the average consumption over your last XX amount of miles, and then a projected estimate of what your remaining real range is left if that recent efficiency trend continues. That's the kind of estimation number you are used to seeing from other companies' EVs. Tesla just puts it there instead of putting as if it's the number on the fuel gauge.
 
Both are available in the car. Actually three things. The little number on the battery gauge is supposed to be a fuel gauge though. It is always displaying, even when there is no route plotted and therefore no hypothetical topography. So it just shows the amount of energy, scaled by a conversion constant.

But in the Energy app on the screen, Trips tab, when you choose a route for the navigation, yes, it does a lot, and it accounts for rise and fall of elevation and topography, approximate speed limits along the route, and will even continually update in real time including all of the energy consumption from your heating and cooling. That will show the projection along your chosen route, and what it estimates you will use up and what you will have remaining.

And the third thing is that in the other tab of the Energy app is more of a general projection, even if you don't have any route plotted. That will show the average consumption over your last XX amount of miles, and then a projected estimate of what your remaining real range is left if that recent efficiency trend continues. That's the kind of estimation number you are used to seeing from other companies' EVs. Tesla just puts it there instead of putting as if it's the number on the fuel gauge