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New, efficient motor design

Discussion in 'Future Cars' started by lklundin, Nov 12, 2016.

  1. lklundin

    lklundin Member

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    One Danish and one Norwegian technical publication are describing a new variant of the Switched Reluctance Motor (SRM)
    called the U-core SRM, developed and patented by the Technical University of Aalborg, Denmark.

    The U-core refers to the (for example 3 pairs of) U-shaped stators, which hold the DC-powered windings.

    A new power electronic controller had to be developed, to properly switch the DC between the different
    pairs of windings, in a BEV this controller will connect directly to the battery, without need for a DC to AC inverter.

    Unlike previous SRM designs, the U-core variant gives the motor both less ripple in the produced momentum and increased efficiency over a wide working range.

    Other advantages:
    Uses no rare earth metals, reducing price and risks in supply chain
    Uses less copper in a stator mount, making for a more compact and cheaper design

    Disadvantage:
    Less produced momentum making the motor mostly useful in a multi motor design,
    e.g. as front engine that can work mainly during high speed cruising, or in a one motor per wheel design.

    A 160 mm thick and 310 mm diameter prototype delivers peak torque of 106 Nm at 35 kW power, a power density of 2.9kW/L and an efficiency peaking at 94%.

    English description:
    CIPED | Compact Intelligent Powerful Electric Drivetrain for EVs

    Danish:
    http://ing.dk/artikel/danske-forskere-vores-elmotor-oger-elbilers-raekkevidde-med-fem-procent-188165

    Norwegian:
    Ny dansk motorteknologi kan gi elbiler lengre rekkevidde
     
  2. WarpedOne

    WarpedOne Supreme Premier

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    So, under 5% improvement in range compared with the most inefficient electric motors out there.
    Progress is good but electric motors are already so good that such 'news' just raise FUD how existing tech is somehow not good enough.

    Shut up and build the batteries. There ain't enough of them.
     
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  3. lklundin

    lklundin Member

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    Let me help you out with a few misconceptions:
    1) The demand for and research into batteries and into motors is orthogonal, the advent of one more motor design will thus not impede the production of batteries.
    2) Improved batteries increase the range of a BEV and/or reduces its price. So does an improved/simpler motor. Even a crude google translate of the headlines of the linked reports will communicate the expectation that this improved motor design will increase the range of BEVs.
    3) To really make transportation sustainable, a cheaper BEV than the Model 3 will be needed. For that an efficient, cheap, simple motor made from just iron and (reduced amounts of) copper will be useful.

    So maybe you should reconsider who is spreading FUD - and probably even what that acronym actually means.
     
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  4. david_42

    david_42 Member

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  5. lklundin

    lklundin Member

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    Right. Naturally, I cannot know if Tesla or anyone else would ever have an interest in this design. However, if it were to be used in a one motor per wheel vehicle, as I mentioned, the torque could be transferred via a shaft avoiding the drawbacks that you mention. Replacing a single axle + motor with two shafts + two motors would have the advantage of torque vectoring, and controlling those two motors electronically would not be hard.
     

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