TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Question on Running new line for 220

Discussion in 'California' started by KingsDude, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. KingsDude

    KingsDude Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2012
    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Anaheim Hills, CA
    I just got my Tesla and I was talking to SCE (So Cal Edison) about the potential programs they offer to residents.

    Their EV charging rate is $.11/kwh but I would need to run a new 220V line to the meter and they'll put a new meter on for free.

    My question is - what gauge wire should I use to run the new line to the street? Unfortunately, I would need to run it for about 120-140 ft so I know it will be costly, but it's worth it for the charging.

    Thanks for the help!
     
  2. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Messages:
    3,399
    Location:
    San Diego
    #2 Cosmacelf, Sep 13, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013
    Normally you would run a wire from the second meter to a panel, and oversize the wire and panel so that if you want to run anything else in the future off that meter, you could.

    Oh wow, just looked at the SCE rates - second meter is definitely the way to go.

    Normally you would get an electrician to do this...
     
  3. texex91

    texex91 Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1,590
    Location:
    hell
  4. KingsDude

    KingsDude Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2012
    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Anaheim Hills, CA
    I'll have to read through it, but I definitely want to get a second meter installed.

    I need to get a new panel and run the 220 line to the street, but just not sure of the gauge wire and my electrician is also a little unsure as there are a ton of options. Figured I'd ask here first, but definitely need to get a second meter.

    SDGE is a different utility and will have the same headaches, but it doesn't matter as it is worth it in the long run.
     
  5. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Messages:
    3,399
    Location:
    San Diego
    Check out this table. Wire Current Ampacities NEC Table 310-16

    I would install a 100 amp panel and feed it with 3 gauge wire. You can then wire your NEMA 14-50 and any other devices that can be set to run at night only from it. Or install a 60 amp panel and go with smaller wire (see table), but then you've no expansion capacity in case you want to do something else in the future (second car, etc.).
     
  6. Apoclyps

    Apoclyps Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2013
    Messages:
    525
    Location:
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Congrats on the new car. Come join us OC-ers in our OC Tesla Meets (will post here in the California section).

    As for your issue, I would talk to an electrician. I didn't go the 2nd meter route, but just getting a 220 plug into my garage was pricey.
     
  7. KingsDude

    KingsDude Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2012
    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Anaheim Hills, CA
    Will probably go with the 100 amp / 3 gauge wire like Cosmacelf suggested. That way, I can add some other things to the panel like washer/dryer and maybe an A/C unit that runs at night.

    Good call
     
  8. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Messages:
    7,019
    120-130 ft. of #2 or #3 copper is going to be pretty costly. It's likely going to be much less expensive to run #2 XHHW-2 aluminum wire (conduit) or USE-2 (direct-bury), terminating it in a service panel, then doing a short run of #3 copper to an HPWC or #6 copper to a 14-50 receptacle.

    How will you be running it? Aerial? Conduit in the ground? Direct-bury? The type of wire or cable you use will depend upon that.
     
  9. KingsDude

    KingsDude Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2012
    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Anaheim Hills, CA
    FlasherZ - thank you for the really in-depth reply and great write-up. I really appreciate it.

    I talked to the electrical company and thy suggested 3/4" conduit. The ground should be #10 and main should be THHN-6 50 Amps. This is what the Tesla installer suggested; however, they don't know the full situation.

    I'm not a electrician, so I'm going to show these posts to mine as he'll most likely understand; but it will most likely be placed above ground, right next to a gutter/ditch and it will not need to be buried. Part of it will definitely be underground though as I have to go under a paved sidewalk and then down a steep hill.

    Thoughts??
     
  10. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Messages:
    7,019
    This is the right wire size to be used from a 50 amp breaker on a service panel to a NEMA 14-50 receptacle ("RV outlet"). However, it may not be approved by your inspectors and SCE if it's used from the meter to a service panel/breaker panel, they may have minimum service size standards. In some cases, they may even require larger cable or wire than what I mention, above. It provides no headroom in case you get a second electric car in the future.

    Perhaps I don't understand your situation, but power cables (especially service entrance cable, where it is for the most part unfused) must be protected against damage. Conduit must be buried, or the cables must run overhead. There are also differences based on where the "service panel" (main breaker) is located for this. Is it at the meter, or is it away from the meter, etc.? Your electrician should know this, so I'd just have him tell you the right things you need to do.

    Here's what I would recommend - and what you should tell your electrician. Even if you're only going to install a NEMA 14-50 receptacle for single-charger overnight charging, I'd suggest you build capacity for at least 2 receptacles (future ready), rather than just a single receptacle. Tell him you would like capacity from their second meter for an 80A continuous load, and for now you'll just have a single 40A continuous load on an RV outlet (NEMA 14-50) on a 50A breaker. Local or PoCo regulations may require a larger service size (maybe even 2/0 or so), he'll know. He'll also help you make the right decision based on cost for copper vs. aluminum, and panel placement, etc. Good luck!
     

Share This Page