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Reliability of maps - are many of you also using your mobile phone maps as backup?

Discussion in 'Tesla, Inc.' started by plasmo, Nov 27, 2016.

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  1. plasmo

    plasmo Member

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    Did my first Roadtrip this Thanksgiving weekend and the Tesla maps routed me thru some very rural areas rather than larger roads. Is there a way to select which route google takes on the onscreen map?
    I find that I'm always using my mobile google maps as a backup just in case.
     
  2. Knightowl

    Knightowl Whovian

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    I typically have abetterroutplanner or teslawaze up on the browser, assuming that the cellular is working otherwize the trusty old Garmin comes out.
     
    • Informative x 1
  3. kort677

    kort677 Banned

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    no, there is no way to choose the route in the car's nav.
    was your traffic setting on? maybe the car routed you that "odd" way because of traffic conditions.
    I sometimes use waze on my Iphone as an alternative and duplicate when in unfamiliar places
     
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  4. PtG62901

    PtG62901 Member

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    Agreed, the routing can be terrible. My Garmin and phone are better.
     
  5. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    No there is not. I often run Waze on my phone to doublecheck the route the car nav recommends. Waze is better at real time traffic.
     
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  6. number12

    number12 Active Member

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    Phone as backup? I didn't know there was another way for nav.. tell me more
     
  7. ⚡️ELECTROMAN⚡️

    ⚡️ELECTROMAN⚡️ Fritterer and waster of hours in an off hand wayer

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    I'm planning on using my iPhone for navigation and media, and my Tesla as an electric dream machine. The best of both worlds.
     
  8. RacerX

    RacerX 3x F1 World Champion #44

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    I had to use my phone for navigation one time this year. I was on a trip out of town when the Tesla cell Network went out for a day. I didn't get lost.
     
  9. davidc18

    davidc18 Active Member

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    We never use the Tesla maps anymore.
     
  10. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    The Tesla Nav maps seem fine as far as accuracy goes. However, I've found that every map system out there has issues somewhere, so I don't doubt that there are places where Tesla's Nav system isn't correct. However, I've driven DFW to Seattle, DFW to Thunder Bay, DFW to Lincoln, and various other places with no issues. Using the cellphone map while driving seems a bit unsafe to me--kind of like texting while driving.
     
  11. wesley888

    wesley888 Member

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    I still rely on Waze exclusively. I have Tesla Nav running side by side just to do a comparison. Waze is much better routing me around the traffic, which is absolutely essential in NY traffic.
     
    • Informative x 1
  12. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    I always use WAZE to navigate. The Tesla nav is OK but has too many issues. The maps are often outdated. It doesn't know about blocked roads or accidents. There is no alternative routes and the traffic based navigation is not near as good as Waze. Any time you are in busy city traffic Waze wins.
    Another annoying issue is my navigation often locks up and just stops working. I have to reboot the screens. It happens way too often. Tesla should just allow screen mirroring with a phone.
    The only reason I use the Tesla nav is on road trips to get the energy prediction.
     
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  13. Ulmo

    Ulmo Active Member

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    I agree, if the cell phone is not properly mounted directed at the driver to see without moving eyes completely off road. In California, I was watching an experienced traffic commissioner in Santa Clara County explain that a dash-mounted device (made part of the car for the sake of the journey) that is not in itself distracting, i.e., is meant for while-driving use, can, with proper mounting and attention, be a legal means to operate one's nav and audio systems (e.g., an iPhone in a phone holder mounted to the dash properly). I did this in my ICE, and I'm about to do this in my Tesla. A good quality phone mount is mandatory; cheap mounts will fly at you during abrupt driving conditions (any mountain road or sudden stop or turn), and you might get distracted as your $1,000 phone goes flying at your head and other hard objects. A quality phone mount properly tested and properly mounted will prevent this. Unfortunately, the best ones I can find wear out in months, and I just have to get another one; it's a safety concern, so I don't complain, AND the one time I tried to put off getting a good replacement, the phone screen cracked (the worn out mount flew off during a normal acceleration event hitting the car interior and shattering the phone screen), costing me over $150; a quality mount for $40 is clearly cheaper than that, plus anything is cheaper than having an accident. I try out top-rated varieties, and usually find some that work OK.

    When that is my situation, I can turn Waze on, try to direct the A/C vent toward the phone in use if A/C is on (and away from phone if heater on) (to keep phone cool since using Waze roasts batteries if the phone is also plugged in, and depletes batteries if the phone isn't plugged in, especially if you also have BlueTooth with Music or Podcasts running too). When this is all true, I then can see the phone basically as safely and easily as any Tesla driver could see the main nav map display on their large screen. I would still use due care and caution only to look when it is safe to look and only to look briefly, even if that means having to accumulate a number of looks at it over time sliced time when traffic conditions don't allow a more sustained look. If I need to see something in particular and can't safely look while driving, I don't look, and take the time and due care and caution to find a safe place to completely pull off the road (such as an offramp with a parking lot nearby), and take a good long look at whatever. This can also double as a break period. I think I will make certain that I also do activities like this during any SuperCharger stops to prevent mid-leg abrupt needs to find random parking like this, but it happens all the time so I'm always ready to take an exit and park to look at my devices.

    Using this method in an older car that had satellite-only (no Internet) nav, I would usually start up anywhere between 2 and 4 nav systems: builtin car nav (has a good interface in Mercedes, and I hope in Tesla too -- always worked OK during test drives), Waze, Google Maps, and the iPhone TomTom app, which is ungodly expensive and getting worse, but can work without any network connection at all via storing an entire country or continent in many gigabytes of phone space (so replaces a TomTom device). Since I sometimes mount two phones on the dash, I am able to leave two different apps running side by side. It is rare that I use Apple's builtin map software, but sometimes it gets running by itself when I press on an address, and it's not far enough to get bugged about it, so I let it do its thing rather than fumble with re-entering the address on another app.

    I echo what other people have said about using more nav apps for less familiar areas. Generally, I try to remember how to drive without any nav at all, so I intentionally do not start up nav for reasonably short and medium length trips which aren't prone to detours or traffic choices. Other times, I might start just one app, so I have an idea of where backups are; sometimes, Google Maps has the best interface for that. Believe it or not, despite Google Waze and Google Maps sharing ownership and data, they are not equivalent, and running one of each on each of my phones is often the best combination when more than one app is a good idea. (Also, each of my phones has a different service provider -- T-Mobile and Verizon. When I get my Tesla this Friday, that will mean I'll have 3: AT&T is on the Tesla from what I understand. Verizon used to have best coverage, but there are a very few areas AT&T has the better coverage (mostly around hwy 4 in north California), and starting in 2016 T-Mobile has even more good areas that are not good in Verizon thanks to a new band T-Mobile has been rolling out, but only newer pricey phones have had that band.) The more detriments I sense in my upcoming drive, the more nav systems I start and use. I am old enough that I have to pull over just to do this, otherwise I just can't drive properly and set those up. It doesn't make sense to start up 5 nav systems for shorter well known drives in good conditions, but for any drive that has problems such as long, unknown roads, detours, accidents, bad weather, commutes, etc., the more apps it makes sense to start up. Since apps heat up the phones, this is best done in summer with the vent-mount phone mounts with the A/C on and pointed at the phones with the phones plugged in and charging. During winter with the heater on, it is more important to try to memorize good routes and turn the phones' screens off and the nav apps turned off and not running, otherwise the phones could overheat; pulling over, occasionally checking the Google Maps and maybe Waze, then deleting the running processes and turning off the phone screens, tends to be best. Sometimes this will get you stuck in a winter accident, though. I hope the Tesla nav can help plug those holes, so I'll look forward to the car's builtin nav, despite everyone's complaints. Perhaps some vents could be turned off in winter enough to let smartphones cool off. Or a dash mounted fan could be installed that bounces cool window air into the phones.

    I look forward to trying the alternative web sites on the Tesla web access. I know I will be using EVTripPlanner.Com, and have already donated. I suspect I will have it bookmarked on my Tesla screen web access. I'm also signed up for all the Tesla smartphone apps I could find, so hopefully any features they come out with will help me, if they ever implement route planning (and I can skip the multiple steps of battery level check and EVTripPlanner.Com, with cross-referencing destination chargers and other sundry trip stops). Someday I hope Waze users can input SuperCharger activity, maybe sharing data with TeslaFi and other apps.
     
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  14. mspohr

    mspohr Active Member

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    I like the traffic reporting in the Tesla (Google) maps better than Waze. Especially on freeways it will show the backups for each direction separately. In Waze, there is just one red line and you don't know if it's in your direction or the opposite direction. Since recent updates, the Tesla Nav has worked well for me for directions.
     
  15. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    Waze shows traffic in each direction separately. Google maps shows traffic in the Tesla navigation, but unfortunately it's not what the actual navigation is using to route around traffic. The traffic data comes from a different source. So what you see as colored lines on the map on the main screen is not what the navigation is using.

    I drive an average of about 100 miles through Los Angeles traffic every day. I always use both the in car nav and Waze side by side. Waze is always more accurate in ETA and finds a better route. Knowing of blocked roads and on/off ramps is very important and Waze knows about those 95% of the time, while the car's nav knows about them 0% of the time. Also very important, Waze calculates two alternatives. Sometimes the time saved on the fastest route is only 1 or 2 minutes but the route is 10 miles longer! I'm happy to take the route that is shorter sacrificing 1 or 2 minutes. Tesla's nav doesn't give me any option. specially from an EV I would expect the navigation to be more versatile to accommodate the different needs and limitation an EV has.
     
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  16. mspohr

    mspohr Active Member

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    You must be referring to the phone Waze app, not the browser version for the Tesla which does not give traffic in two directions. I don't fiddle with extra screens... too distracting.
    Sorry to hear that you drive 100 mi/day in LA. You probably are a navigation pro.
     
  17. Gwgan

    Gwgan Almost a wagon

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    Just drove an hour to a nearby town. In car estimate was 1.5 hours and through an intervening town at a busy time. Other map programs on my phone offered at least one alternate route and all duration estimates were more realistic.
     

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