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Repaint with new color

Discussion in 'Roadster' started by ravng, May 13, 2016.

  1. ravng

    ravng Member

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    Sep 9, 2014
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    Location:
    Norway
    Just notices this lightning green roadster for sale here in Norway.
    This was originally a Thunder gray (like mine), but the owner had it repainted lightning green (at a tesla certified shop) due to some scratches etc.

    Do you guys think this affects the future "collector value" of this car or not?
    Anyway, I think it looks amazing.

    [​IMG]



    Full ad here: Tesla Roadster
     
  2. MileHighMotoring

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    Parker, CO
    If it was done properly, I doubt it would have much effect. It's all up the buyer's preference. Some love flashy colors on sports cars, others want a more sedate hue and would never buy a green or orange or yellow car. Personally I think that looks fantastic, though I'd get rid of the tan interior trim now and go with black or silver/grey.
     
  3. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    I hate repaints and personally would be a deal breaker for me. Only way to do a repaint right is to pull off every panel and paint them individually. Yes I do feel it affects the collectors value, collectors are very specific to cars being original and as close to that as possible as the car ages.
     
  4. shrink

    shrink Member

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    Not necessarily, there's a healthy market for restored classic and collectible cars, and repaints certainly didn't hurt the value of these cars:

    10 Junkyard Cars Restored into Luxury Classics

    I like the repaint above. As far as long term value, who knows? All that really matters is the value and enjoyment that owner is getting from the lightning green and I'm sure it's well worth it.

    Although, personally, if I wanted to change the color, I'd just put on a wrap and see how I like it for the life span of the wrap.
     
  5. Tesla 940

    Tesla 940 Member

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    While I'm no "expert", from what I've seen repainting a collector car with any color other than original generally hurts its resale value. My limited experience is based upon 60s muscle cars.
     
  6. simonog

    simonog Member

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    Given that there are so few Roadsters, the usual market considerations may well not apply.

    If someone really wants one, I would doubt the colour change will deter as long as the buyer likes the new colour. If the cars ever become collectible , however, at that point it would probably be worth restoring to the original colour.
     
  7. MLAUTO

    MLAUTO Member

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    The original paint is extremely thin. Even minor scratches are near impossible to buff out without going through the clear. A quality repaint with a few more coats of clear would be a lot more durable, but to take the car all apart and do it correctly gets pretty expensive. The value will be determined by how well the job was done. Original pristine cars will always be worth more than repainted ones, but "collector" values for non-molested ones are still years away, and battery condition will be a bigger factor than paint.
     
  8. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    I agree the paint is thin and true on the quality paint job, the right/correct paint job is where a person of detail cannot tell the car was repainted. Also putting all the panels in an oven to cure properly my opinion is essential for a prime paint job, only issue is that with the body/main cabin shell, the whole car needs to be sitting in the oven and that will cause the battery pack to substantially rise in temp. I personally would drop the battery and then put the car in the oven unless you didn't care about your battery health and were getting ready to replace it anyways. The car will eat up lots of battery juice trying to keep the battery cool in the oven.
     
  9. MLAUTO

    MLAUTO Member

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    With a urethane paint an oven bake is just to speed up delivery time. After several days at normal temps most urethanes will be fully cured. An oven bake is around 140' for less than an hour, and I've seen paint in the sun reach 135' for several hours. If the car is disassembled to paint, by the time it is back together the paint should be fully cured.
     

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