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Significant snow accumulation in the wheel wells?

Discussion in 'Canada' started by Jeeps17, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. Jeeps17

    Jeeps17 Cath Jockey in a P85

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2012
    Messages:
    873
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Hello everyone,

    I came across this thread on the "other" Tesla forums, and noted one owner's comment (suspiciously named Robert22, living in Boston :wink:), quoted below:

    "Robert22 | FEBRUARY 24, 2013
    I've been driving in snow the last two weekends here in the Boston area. One issue owners should be aware of is the potential for the accumulation of snow and ice inside the wheel well and on the tire itself. This was brought to my attention when on returning from a grocery store run, I was shocked to find the side fender panel at the rear of the headlight literally pulled apart from the adjoining panel and flayed out. At first I thought someone hit me but on closer inspection the panel and all surfaces were pristine. The fender has a tongue in groove insertion and I was tempted to try to reattach it, but waited for a Tesla service center employee to take a look at it. What we surmised was that accumulated snow or ice on the tire swung around and exerted a significant force on the projected tabs inside the wheel well that hold the side fender in place. He snapped it back in without incident instantly curing my hypertension. Take home message: There's not much clearance in the wheel wells for accumulated snow and ice, check them frequently. It would be nice to able to raise the car and have it hold during snow conditions without automatically dropping again at a certain speed. Hopefully a future software update might allow this."

    Another owner replied with a probable cause:

    "Pungoteague_Dave | FEBRUARY 24, 2013
    Don't let anything accumulate in the wheel wells. They are a weak point on the cars. I had a chance to take apart the rear of my S to install the Torklift hitch receiver, which included detaching the fender wells from the bumper. The fender wells are made of a cheap felt/fiber material that is easily bent and deformed, and won't snap back into shape like plastic or ABS. It is much lighter than the plastic liners used on most cars, which may be the reason. It is attached with plastic push-in buttons on the lower edges, and one nut in the middle that keeps it from sagging. The outside edge is simply trapped by the body panels, with no attachments on that edge. The rub is that is has an absorbent felt-like surface so isn't slick and therefore doesn't shed mud and snow like most wheel wells."

    Obviously, as someone living in winter country, this could be problematic. Several people have expressed a desire for Tesla to allow driving at speed with the suspension raised above standard, I do not know if it will happen. Have any of the Canadian S owners had similar issues?
     
  2. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    15,848
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    I've certainly had snow accumulation inside the wheel spokes. On one occasion I heard something rubbing on the front right wheel, but whatever it was fell off before I could pull over to look. Other than that no issues.

    I suspect Tesla would have to redo crash testing with the car in the raised position, if they were to allow faster driving in that position. I really want to be able to go faster with it raised. I'm not talking highway speed. Side streets are usually the last to get plowed, so it would be fantastic if we could keep the car raised while driving 40-50 kph (25-30 mph).
     

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