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Tracking KWH

Discussion in 'Model S' started by Mikerad, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. Mikerad

    Mikerad Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    United States
    Yesterday I became the proud owner of a 90D.

    [SUB] Tesla Delivery.jpg [/SUB]

    I have a background in electrical engineering, so I and a certified electrician friend installed the NEMA 14-50 outlet in my garage. I am also a techno-geek-nerd, and I knew I'd want to track the power used by the car, so I bought a nice KWH meter from EKM that tracks many parameters, and best of all, can upload them to the cloud. Here's the outlet - the meter is at the top:

    NEMA outlet plus meter.jpg

    Forgive the beat up wall, but note the twisted pair of wires coming out of the meter box toward the left. That is an RS-485 line that goes to an EKM "PUSH" box, which sends the data up to the cloud via my home Wifi (that's the Netgear box in the pic below).

    PUSH box.jpg

    From there, I can monitor my power usage via any browser. The site is a bit buggy and I am still learning it, but it's basically functional.



    [​IMG]



    I got the car home at around 5:30 pm, and sat and played with a few things. It wasn't trying to charge, but it was replenishing what I used.


    At about 9:30 pm, I sat at my desk and told it to charge​ via the Tesla app on my iPhone​
    , so that I could watch it on the graph​ on my PC​
    in real time. Cool.



    At 10 pm I played a little more. At 1 am it started a scheduled charge, which didn't last long - ended around 1:20 am.


    For this screen grab, I hovered the mouse over Amps Line 1 at the 1 am position, and you can see that the L1 current was 40 amps.


    There are tons of other bits of data available, but for now, these are the ones that interest me.


    I'll apply for Time of Use metering as soon as the car is registered; after that, I will pay 4 or 5 cents per KWH (depending on which exact plan I choose) for off-hours consumption. My daytime consumption should cap out at around 10.5 cents per KWH at peak times, because I believe I have sufficient solar capacity to not need to pay NV Energy. We'll see.

    - Mike R.
     
  2. byan1232

    byan1232 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2015
    Messages:
    330
    Location:
    New York, NY
    btw welcome to the forums and congrats on your new tesla MS! Excited to see your results.
     
  3. Mikerad

    Mikerad Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    United States
    Thanks much! Looking forward to this.

    - Mike.
     
  4. emchen

    emchen Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2015
    Messages:
    91
    Location:
    Valencia, CA
    Where in the US do you get electricity at 4 - 5 cents per kWh? Super Off Peak (weekdays 10P - 7A) here in Socal is 11 cents per kWh. Just read your post more carefully...NV = Nevada.:redface:
     
  5. Mikerad

    Mikerad Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    United States
    emchen...

    Sorry to take so long to reply - just figured out how to find my own posts!

    Yes, electricity gets cheap here if you have an EV - the cost per kWh actually drops below 4 cents at night in winter. The flip side is that it gets very pricey (39 cents / kWh) during prime air conditioning hours (1 to 7 pm) in summer. I am hoping that my over-spec'd Solar City system will save me there - I am locked in at 10.5 cents with them.

    Here is an extract from the NV Energy site:

    upload_2016-3-17_5-26-21.png

    - Mike.
     

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