Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • The final cut of the 8th episode of the Tesla Motors Club Podcast, featuring Balazs Biro, of the prominent Hungarian EV channel Villanyautósok, is now available. You can watch it now on YouTube or listen to it on all major podcast networks.

UP vs HR Lowering Springs

MODEL+

Active Member
Global Vendor
Oct 21, 2020
1,072
989
Portland, OR
Hi,

I tend to notice similar threads of xxx vs xxx lowering springs quite often around here.

Here is our stance on that topic and I hope people can reference from here on out.

If you insist, we prefer H&R.


Danny
 

MODEL+

Active Member
Global Vendor
Oct 21, 2020
1,072
989
Portland, OR
wow, your pic of the front strut scares me...definitely no springs only on this car
Yeah, we don't say this just to milk more money by selling you coilovers. On other applications, we'd recommend lowering springs all day long, but these cars not so much. Time and time again we see people around here doing lowering springs and become dissatisfied, then have to do it all over again with coilovers.

Danny
 
  • Like
Reactions: TFSMotorsport
honestly, coilovers are way easier to install anyway, so i'm not too worried about the cost. they also provide a tangible benefit over stock. have you noticed that camber goes off a lot when lowering these cars 1.2-1.5 inches? i assume toe is fully adjustable too and can be accounted for on a mostly stock car with just the mild drop.

just have to convince myself that MCS with remote reservoir is NOT needed since that's what I've put on cars in the past (for track use of course).
 

MODEL+

Active Member
Global Vendor
Oct 21, 2020
1,072
989
Portland, OR
honestly, coilovers are way easier to install anyway, so i'm not too worried about the cost. they also provide a tangible benefit over stock. have you noticed that camber goes off a lot when lowering these cars 1.2-1.5 inches? i assume toe is fully adjustable too and can be accounted for on a mostly stock car with just the mild drop.

just have to convince myself that MCS with remote reservoir is NOT needed since that's what I've put on cars in the past (for track use of course).
These cars actually do pretty well in the camber / toe department when lowering.

Toe will be adjustable back to factory spec without the need for aftermarket arms.
Camber is averaging around -1.5 degree for our car that is dropped about 2". Some BMWs for example, will come with more negative camber than this from factory.


Danny
 

MODEL+

Active Member
Global Vendor
Oct 21, 2020
1,072
989
Portland, OR
got it, thanks...ya my bmw m3 was set at -3.5 up front, but that was on purpose as it was a track car...

-1.5 isn't bad at all and probably preferable to me anyway...in the end toe kills tires much much faster than camber anyway
You got the right idea.
In our use case, we actually take natural negative camber to our advantage ;)

Image.jpeg


Danny
 
I rode in a buddy's P3 with H&R springs with three ppl for over a hundred miles, with relatively rough surfaces and the occasional dips and potholes throughout the trip. I can't speak to how they compare to UP springs, but having MPP comfort coilovers on mine, they rode surprisingly well the entire time, considering they were springs and not necessarily matched to the oem shocks.
 
Riding on bump stops is not a bad thing IF setup properly. Most cars use the bump stops as an active part of the suspension travel to increase spring rate. This is something that was pioneered by BMW back in the 90's as a way to use soft main springs, but still have a car that does not roll, squat or dive heavily upon inputs. Every BMW car since has used bump stops as additional springs to aid in the purpose of the main springs.

The issue comes with there is an underdamped (not dampened) situation with a shock from the factory (model 3) that then has lowering springs installed on it. This compresses the bump stop at static ride height increasing the spring rate heavily to a level that is not controllable by the factory damper.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MODEL+

tom @ eas

Member
Global Vendor
Oct 11, 2021
398
255
Anaheim, CA
Riding on bump stops is not a bad thing IF setup properly. Most cars use the bump stops as an active part of the suspension travel to increase spring rate. This is something that was pioneered by BMW back in the 90's as a way to use soft main springs, but still have a car that does not roll, squat or dive heavily upon inputs. Every BMW car since has used bump stops as additional springs to aid in the purpose of the main springs.

The issue comes with there is an underdamped (not dampened) situation with a shock from the factory (model 3) that then has lowering springs installed on it. This compresses the bump stop at static ride height increasing the spring rate heavily to a level that is not controllable by the factory damper.


Maybe a bit of a necrobump here, but a good post. Here's a post from the BMW forums that compare different bump stops and their intended use.

 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top