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Anyone have experience with stationary storage for EV charging at home?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by redline0316, May 31, 2014.

  1. redline0316

    redline0316 Member

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    I'm currently on EV TOU rate that is 30c on-peak and 10c off-peak. I have a need to charge during on-peak times so I was thinking of attaching some batteries at home. I know Tesla has a product for the home, but I think I am looking for something in the 80kwh range of capacity. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

    Thanks!
     
  2. wk057

    wk057 Senior Tinkerer

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    My guess is that after accounting for efficiency losses, time, effort, initial cost, etc, you'll likely either never even break even or have an ROI time-frame in the many decades range.

    It might make more sense to invest in solar or similar renewable energy to offset your daytime charging.
     
  3. drees

    drees Active Member

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    Yep, in general with net-metering, you're much better off adding some solar.

    80 kWh of batteries is going to cost $20k just for the batteries.

    $20k will buy a lot of solar these days - at least 5 kW after tax credits. In the Bay Area it could generate up to 7500 kWh / year.
     
  4. redline0316

    redline0316 Member

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    Hmm good point. We have a 7kw system currently, but it doesn't really help much. I'm thinking some battery storage could help if there is a blackout, and EVs need to be charged...
     
  5. Cottonwood

    Cottonwood Roadster#433, Model S#S37

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    In general, you will get more payback for your investment if you add to your solar capacity and put in a backup generator. If you have SMA gird tied inverters (SunnyBoy), they make a very nice integrated product called the SunnyIsland that let's the system be grid tied when the grid is available, but work as an Island with batteries when the grid goes away. As I said, a backup generator is far more cost effective for backup power than a SunnyIsland or similar setup.
     

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