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Charges at supercharger but not at home or destination chargers

So my Y recently started to not charge at home. It was giving me a solid blue light with the app displaying a red charging cable. I was also not able to charge at a hotel Tesla destination charger. I was able to charge at a supercharger. I did have it set for off peak charging but turned that off thinking that was the problem. It is still not charging. Any ideas??
 

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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
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Riverside Co. CA
Any ideas??

That you have a bad onboard charger in the car. Classic symptom of "can not charge with any level 2 charger but can supercharge". supercharging bypasses the onboard charger.

Make a service appointment (if you havent already) then drive to your local service center and see if they can squeeze you in. It appears to me that you joined TMC to ask this question, so thats the advice I would give you.
 
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Yep, got a plenty good idea.
Fundamentally, sitting in front of the battery, is the actual charger. This is a DC-DC converter (DC in, DC out), whose output voltage and current into the battery is controlled and actually makes electrons flow into the battery.
Now, the input for the actual charger comes from one of two places:
  1. A DC voltage from a supercharger.
  2. A DC voltage from an AC rectifier.
Let's talk about #2. City power at your house or at destination chargers comes in AC; level 1 is 120 VAC, Level 2 is 208/220 VAC. Either of these gets rectified, that is, converted to DC, and then gets sent to the car's charger.

Pretty clear, then: Your actual charger in the car, that DC->DC converter, is working just fine.
The AC->DC rectifier appears to be out to lunch.

Now that we know the general area.. that's cool, but neither you nor I are going to be able to fix this. There's lots that can go wrong: Loose wires, blown fuses, blown transistors, parts that should be soldered but aren't, parts that shouldn't be soldered together but are, diodes that aren't diodes any more, bad ICs, etc., etc.. (Can you tell I diagnose broken electronics for a living?)

At this point, fire up your app, select Service, Select Battery, Select Charging. Tell them the Evil That Has Befallen you. This is what warranties are for; my experience with Tesla is that they fix stuff like this pretty quickly.

One minor suggestion. I don't feel totally comfortable with the idea. You might try, with your mobile connector, hooking up to a 120 VAC wall socket, and see if the car will charge with that. But. You've got a failure in the car. This kind of stuff is electrical high power: For sure, it's not a table lamp. If Things Go Wrong, smoke and worse can happen. More likely, before smoke, you'll get a blown fuse, but it does mean additional hardware going that-a-way if something bad happens.

It's kind of like finding a gas leak on an ICE car. Yes, you can drive it around. Um. Do you really want to do that? In fact, if I were you, driving that car right now, until this gets fixed, might be something one might want to think twice about.
 
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jdp1000

New Member
Feb 27, 2022
2
0
US
I recently had the same issue with my 2021 M3LR. The only difference was I would plug in and the light would go from blue to just off. Mobile charger didn't work, destination chargers didn't work, only Super Chargers and non-tesla DC charging worked. You need to get the Power ECU module replaced via a service appointment.

NOTE: It may take a while for them to get a replacement part for... reasons. It took me a couple weeks before they could replace. So request a loaner when you make the appointment, or be ready to super charge until the part is available and you can take it in for the swap.

The actual repair only takes them a few hours.
 
Yep, got a plenty good idea.
Fundamentally, sitting in front of the battery, is the actual charger. This is a DC-DC converter (DC in, DC out), whose output voltage and current into the battery is controlled and actually makes electrons flow into the battery.
Now, the input for the actual charger comes from one of two places:
  1. A DC voltage from a supercharger.
  2. A DC voltage from an AC rectifier.
Let's talk about #2. City power at your house or at destination chargers comes in AC; level 1 is 120 VAC, Level 2 is 208/220 VAC. Either of these gets rectified, that is, converted to DC, and then gets sent to the car's charger.

Pretty clear, then: Your actual charger in the car, that DC->DC converter, is working just fine.
The AC->DC rectifier appears to be out to lunch.

Now that we know the general area.. that's cool, but neither you nor I are going to be able to fix this. There's lots that can go wrong: Loose wires, blown fuses, blown transistors, parts that should be soldered but aren't, parts that shouldn't be soldered together but are, diodes that aren't diodes any more, bad ICs, etc., etc.. (Can you tell I diagnose broken electronics for a living?)

At this point, fire up your app, select Service, Select Battery, Select Charging. Tell them the Evil That Has Befallen you. This is what warranties are for; my experience with Tesla is that they fix stuff like this pretty quickly.

One minor suggestion. I don't feel totally comfortable with the idea. You might try, with your mobile connector, hooking up to a 120 VAC wall socket, and see if the car will charge with that. But. You've got a failure in the car. This kind of stuff is electrical high power: For sure, it's not a table lamp. If Things Go Wrong, smoke and worse can happen. More likely, before smoke, you'll get a blown fuse, but it does mean additional hardware going that-a-way if something bad happens.

It's kind of like finding a gas leak on an ICE car. Yes, you can drive it around. Um. Do you really want to do that? In fact, if I were you, driving that car right now, until this gets fixed, might be something one might want to think twice about.
Sound like you diagnosed it! I did try a 120 outlet with the same results. I will set up an appointment
 
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