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Consumers storing Grid Power

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by vfx, Nov 7, 2011.

  1. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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  2. VolkerP

    VolkerP EU Model S P-37

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    I agree on EVs as a possibility to help stabilizing the grid. Tesla did some research tool, it appears to be a fairly easy approach.
    Smarter Charging | Blog | Tesla Motors

    DBM stated they want to put their Wunder battery into grid stabilizing projects.

    Last month Greenpeace Energy Germany started a tariff to serve natural gas customers with hydrogen produced from excessive grid power. Later on, they will transform hydrogen and CO2 into synthetic methane.

    There is enough potential to swallow any amount of renewable energy peaks for utilities. They must build up these capacities in sync with renewable generation. IMHO the costs should not be placed on the renewables alone, but on every kWh sold.
     
  3. Robert.Boston

    Robert.Boston Model S VIN P01536

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    Agreed, Volker. The grid operator for the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., PJM, will spend $3.8 billion in "capacity payments" next year. These are payments to supply resources to ensure that there are enough resources around to meet peak loads. These units need the capacity payments because they are used so infrequently that they can't justify staying around without the top-up payments. If you could shift load sharply to smooth out usage (not just at a few peak periods, but consistently), the capacity payments could go away. You'd also save hugely on deferred transmission and distribution upgrades.

    Efficient management of loads is not just about renewables!
     

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