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Deciphering "Message X-1"

Discussion in 'TMC Connect' started by Johan, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. Johan

    Johan Took a TSLA bear test. Came back negative.

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    #1 Johan, Feb 2, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
    Goes-to-11.png
    New drop.png is up! It reads:

    Ma-eDibeh-yazzieTkinMosaiKlizzie-yazzieGah-MosaiNe-ahs-jahNa-as-tso-si/
    [email protected]/

    ... Guess there's and e-mail adress in there (the part with the @). Now looking at how this might med crypted/scrambled. The capitalizations must mean something, those letters come first in words? Names?

    --------- Update:

    The "91461024" comes from "[email protected]" which was julietsteams username on flickr.

    And looking at that account there4 is a new image there uploaded today:

    8439495727_d25898db7c_b.jpg
    Image has a flickr name of Message X-1

    ------ Updtate:

    First part typed out is:

    ZDSBR AET EZP HIYSXZZ!
    NZ YKN H ZBDOD TZCZQYSN UKTP DSIN BTW UIAENZWA
    YQVZIATVK EAUMHM FDEA SFI HOOCX VIWFV BFGAQKN
    JG ZUK RYCEE. ANBKADSH’R VD JWZ GUO E’JZ GGWQID
    RS O GLHYU Y S CBJM AS I ABNZF AOIUJR K 2 A HJ NFQ
    YC TP YCR WKE. SXTLE FJXX! JV PLXD PQ IYBW I VVHN KOD
    JBE PUMZRTDFNLJU! UHASXV ZMP R XFSL SU EGQA S TZP
    GEWH LMYQV CXN FSFTLKMMQWBU AE RHM UV RE. MJOS
    SZRRX IMB MHX QWM RNAOGR. OJDF KXDKWQF BD ZBHEK
    RT SU QFNRUQNT HZ LX VNY FAQ EAPK SKP WY PKA EKORTCM.

    Don't have time to type the rest... Gotta work (I'm on call). Looks like a simple substitution cipher to me...
     
  2. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    #2 TEG, Feb 3, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
    Goes-to-11.png
    Putting this in a quote so it stays in all caps:
    I don't think it is a simple character substitution this time. The character frequencies are too uniform.
    (For instance, Z about as common as E) so I think it is something a bit more sophisticated.
    I tried various ROT (including ROT13) but that didn't seem to work.
    Based on previous clues, it is probably something fairly "standard", but I haven't stumbled on it yet.

    Might be something in here that could help:
    CrypTool-Online
    The square outline in the crypted text makes me think it could be a "four square" cipher:
    CrypTool-Online / Ciphers / Four-Square
    We could possibly decrypt it with this:
    test it
    but would need to figure out the code words...

    (Getting too tired to do more tonight...)


    - - - Updated - - -

    Just taking only the capitals from the banner clue, it almost seems like this lines up:
    [email protected]/
    [email protected]/
     
  3. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    #3 TEG, Feb 3, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
  4. charliestyr

    charliestyr EVangelist

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    I've put off opening this thread for fear of getting sucked in to whatever was going on inside. Unfortunately I just read through it all.. wow.

    As for the latest thing, Message X-1. What's bugging me is the half changed colour words in the original picture. If it means anything (the separate square) do you discard the half coloured words or keep them? Either way it is too late for me to get too involved with this, and I have to be up early tomorrow. I threw a few segments of it at a few cryptography solving things and came up with nothing.

    I thought there seemed to be a lot of long words in there (too many) and also too many single letter "words" that are of different letters. So yeah, not a simple substitution. Tried using cryptography solvers ignoring spaces as well and no luck.

    Good luck ;-)
     
  5. Bearman

    Bearman Member

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    Ok, I am looking into the posted cipher atm. Thought we could post any data or progress on it as we go.

    Here is the frequency analysis for single and dual letters:

    1190 chars
    a : 46 ... 3.9 %
    b : 48 ... 4.0 %
    c : 29 ... 2.4 %
    d : 45 ... 3.8 %
    e : 51 ... 4.3 %
    f : 47 ... 3.9 %
    g : 37 ... 3.1 %
    h : 48 ... 4.0 %
    i : 45 ... 3.8 %
    j : 46 ... 3.9 %
    k : 51 ... 4.3 %
    l : 32 ... 2.7 %
    m : 46 ... 3.9 %
    n : 43 ... 3.6 %
    o : 40 ... 3.4 %
    p : 49 ... 4.1 %
    q : 50 ... 4.2 %
    r : 46 ... 3.9 %
    s : 49 ... 4.1 %
    t : 47 ... 3.9 %
    u : 42 ... 3.5 %
    v : 36 ... 3.0 %
    w : 35 ... 2.9 %
    x : 37 ... 3.1 %
    y : 49 ... 4.1 %
    z : 54 ... 4.5 %

    as => 9
    dt => 8
    ia => 7
    yq => 7
    uk => 7
    iy => 7
    tz => 6
    cx => 6
    tp => 6
    qi => 6
    be => 6
    zr => 6
    nz => 6
    ph => 6
    oe => 5
    tj => 5
    nd => 5
    yc => 5
    e. => 5
    je => 5
    fv => 5
    uq => 5
    wy => 5
    bw => 5
    nf => 5
    jm => 5
    si => 5
    zy => 5
    kn => 5
    sn => 5
    kp => 4
    qw => 4
    pk => 4
    mb => 4
    qt => 4
    qf => 4
    ek => 4
    rj => 4
    qp => 4
    et => 4
    zh => 4
    rz => 4
    to => 4
    tf => 4
    sx => 4
    kg => 4
    hb => 4
    zp => 4
    km => 4
    my => 4
    mh => 4
    ea => 4
    og => 4
    ae => 4
    rv => 4
    ka => 4
    sf => 4
    hm => 4
    bk => 4
    bn => 4
    fa => 4
    hz => 4
    fn => 4
    mp => 4
    aq => 4
    ko => 4
    xd => 4
    ao => 4
    vk => 4
    tl => 4
    xn => 4

    IC=Index of coincidence, Kappa = Friedman/26(letters in alphabet)
    Friedman IC: 0.9981 (kappa-plaintext: 0.0384) for this cipher
    Friedman IC: 2.7816 (kappa-plaintext: 1.0698) Navajo (A,I,H,L,S,T)
    Friedman IC: 1.7189 (kappa-plaintext: 0.6611) English (E,T,A,I,O,N)

    I dont have any idea of what kind of cipher this is yet or any keywords, the kappa suggests this is a very random cipher so either some kind of square cipher as suggested by Teg or just a Running Key vignere cipher.
    Going to try out some online tools just to see what they suggest this is.
     
  6. Bearman

    Bearman Member

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    Ok i found some stuff to help identify the cipher:

    http://home.comcast.net/~acabion/acarefstats.html

    IC number is to be divided by 1000 for comparison.

    Image1.gif Image2.gif

    I tested the cipher on this webpage: http://home.comcast.net/~acabion/refscore.html

    Which gives us this information:

    len: 1151 IC: 38 MIC: 40 MKA: 46 DIC: 17 EDI: 18 LR: 7 ROD: 49 LDI: 414 SDD: 109

    Number of standard deviations from averages for each cipher type:

    RunningKey 4
    Periodic gromark 5
    Progkey beaufort 5
    Randomtext 6
    Gromark 6
    Progressivekey 6
    Vigautokey 6
    Trifid 7
    Nicodemus 7
    Portax 7
    Digrafid 8
    ...

    Stats abbrevations:
    len = length. IC = Index of Coincidence times 1000. MIC = max IC for periods 1-15, times 1000.
    MKA = max kappa for periods 1-15, times 1000. DIC = Digraphic Index of Coincidence, times 10000.
    EDI = DIC for even numbered pairs, times 10000. LR = Long Repeat (percentage of 3 symbol repeats).
    ROD = percentage of odd-spaced repeats to all repeats. LDI = average English log digraph score.
    SDD = average English single letter - digraph discrepancy score.
     
  7. Johan

    Johan Took a TSLA bear test. Came back negative.

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    Ok so I've been trying to hit the cipher from some different angles of attack. Found a really cool program that I downloaded:

    http://www.cryptool.org/en/cryptool1

    No luck so far... Perhaps we won't be able to get anywhere with this until we either get more clues as to what the message or parts of it is supposed to contain and/or some clue as to the type of cipher used. I also thought the "X-1" naming of the message was an implication of the type of code used... Perhaps this isn't the message, but the key? As a four-square type key, or a "one time pad"?

    If we do think this is the message, here are some of my assumptions. Do you agree?:

    * The message is in English
    * The spaces are not code, hence the length of the crypto words correspond to the length of the plain text words
    * The "!" "." and apostrophes are not encrypted
    * The numbers "22" are in plain text

    Some assumptions
     
  8. efusco

    efusco Moderator - Model S & X forums

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  9. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    #9 TEG, Feb 4, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
    Yes, I assume so. All other clues were. It wouldn't surprise me if it contained some misspellings, and some archaic phrases.

    In this case, I am not sure what to make of the spaces. They could be random to make it look like sentences instead of a big block of characters.
    There seem to be too many one letters separated by one spaces for it to be one to one spaces in cipher to spaces in plain text. Maybe the number of spaces is correct but the decoding moves them around in the plain text?
    I got a bit fixated on this:
    "AOIUJR K 2 A HJ NFQ"
    What wording could have _ 2 _ __ ___ ?
    It doesn't seem like the spacing could be right on that.
    Just trying to think of a sequence that could fit, I supposed something like this is possible:
    "SWITCH A 2 B TO USE"... If they did something like use 2 to represent the word "to".
    Really stretching there.
    Is there some Shakespeare in here:
    "2 A HJ NFQ YC TP"
    "2 B OR NOT TO BE"
    ...

    Yes, based on previous puzzles, I assume that the numbers and punctuation could be non-encrypted.
    The fact that the exclamations and question marks are at the end of "words" make it seems like their positioning is somehow correct.
    "TOEI KGOM. MBNG? HBGM? ERJII. DDTOT?"
    They might just be "no-ops" thrown in there to make the text blocks look like sentences again.
     
  10. Bearman

    Bearman Member

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    I think it is a good assumption that the message is in English and the other assumptions are ok to start out with.
    From what i can see from the numbers the cipher could be a one time pad/running key because that's what some of the test pages suggested. I tried to find the length of the encryption key by breaking up the ciphertext and calculating the I.C. for each subsequence but it stays very flat up to 20 characters. This also points to a key that's the length of the message or at least >20 chars.

    Maybe i did something wrong or maybe there is some other encryption method used but ill dig into this some more, if we use your assumptions then maybe we can make some wild guesses on a few of the letters surrounding the symbols.
    ANBKADSH’R should be ANBKADSH’S i would think?

    If the encryption method used is a periodic gromark, which was high on the likelihood rankings in the tests, there needs to be a keyword to solve it so any guesses are welcome.
    Here is a solver where you can guess keywords:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~fpcorr/PeriodicGromark/PeriodicGromarkDecoder.html
     
  11. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Someone may want to proofread the encrypted text I posted. There could certainly be typos in there...
     
  12. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    Goes-to-11.png
    Autokey cipher


    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Jump to: navigation, search






    A tabula recta for use with an autokey cipher
    An autokey cipher (also known as the autoclave cipher) is a cipher which incorporates the message (the plaintext) into the key. There are two forms of autokey cipher: key autokey and text autokey ciphers. A key-autokey cipher uses previous members of the keystream to determine the next element in the keystream. A text-autokey uses the previous message text to determine the next element in the keystream.

    In modern cryptography, self-synchronizing stream ciphers are autokey ciphers.





    Contents
    [hide] 1 History
    2 Cryptanalysis
    3 Autokey in modern ciphers
    4 See also
    5 Notes
    6 References
    7 External links


    [edit] History

    The first autokey cipher was invented by Girolamo Cardano, and contained a fatal defect. Like many autokey ciphers it used the plaintext to encrypt itself; however, since there was no additional key, it is no easier for the intended recipient to read the message than anyone else who knows that the cipher is being used.[1] A number of attempts were made by other cryptographers to produce a system that was neither trivial to break nor too difficult for the intended recipient to decipher. Eventually one was invented in 1564 by Giovan Battista Bellaso using a "reciprocal table" with five alphabets of his invention and another form was described in 1586 by Blaise de Vigenère with a similar reciprocal table of ten alphabets.

    One popular form of autokey starts with a tabula recta, a square with 26 copies of the alphabet, the first line starting with 'A', the next line starting with 'B', etc., like the one above. In order to encrypt a plaintext, one locates the row with the first letter to be encrypted, and the column with the first letter of the key. The letter where the line and column cross is the ciphertext letter.

    Giovan Battista Bellaso used the first letter of each word as a primer to start his text autokey. Blaise de Vigenère used as a primer an agreed-upon single letter of the alphabet.

    The autokey cipher as used by the members of the American Cryptogram Association is in the way the key is generated. It starts with a relatively short keyword, and appends the message to it. So if the keyword is "QUEENLY", and the message is "ATTACK AT DAWN", the key would be "QUEENLYATTACKATDAWN" [2


    Vigen%C3%A8re_square_shading_svg.png
     
  13. Bearman

    Bearman Member

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    #13 Bearman, Feb 4, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
    Goes-to-11.png
    I went through the text and found some errors which i corrected, here is the new cipher text:

    Doesnt change the test scores much:
    len: 1152 IC: 38 MIC: 40 MKA: 46 DIC: 17 EDI: 16 LR: 7 ROD: 50 LDI: 414 SDD: 110

    Number of standard deviations from averages for each cipher type:

    RunningKey 4
    Periodic gromark 5
    Progkey beaufort 5
    Randomtext 5
    Gromark 5
    Progressivekey 6
    Vigautokey 6
    ...
    Stats abbrevations:
    len = length. IC = Index of Coincidence times 1000. MIC = max IC for periods 1-15, times 1000.
    MKA = max kappa for periods 1-15, times 1000. DIC = Digraphic Index of Coincidence, times 10000.
    EDI = DIC for even numbered pairs, times 10000. LR = Long Repeat (percentage of 3 symbol repeats).
    ROD = percentage of odd-spaced repeats to all repeats. LDI = average English log digraph score.
    SDD = average English single letter - digraph discrepancy score.
     
  14. Hobiemon

    Hobiemon Member

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    Goes-to-11.png
    I received a private message from TESLIVE and all it said was "autokey". Hope this helps!
     
  15. charliestyr

    charliestyr EVangelist

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    Goes-to-11.png
    ok, so assuming it's an autokey cipher, what would the keyword be?

    I tried out a few on this website here:

    http://rumkin.com/tools/cipher/vigenere-autokey.php

    I tried, teslive, tesla, x, for example but not sure if I am going down the right route. That above site seems to shift the characters for removing the keyword... i.e. reversing the autokey cipher business.

    I then shoved the output into a normal cipher solver kind of thing, here:

    Decrypto 8.5, Online Cryptoquip and Cryptogram Solver

    I am new to this so have no idea how wrong this may be. :p
     
  16. Bearman

    Bearman Member

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    Yes, thanks!

    Autokey cipher.... thats funny how could we miss that? :D
     
  17. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    #17 TEG, Feb 4, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
    I tired using the same site, and the alphabet key we found in the last encypted puzzle: "TESLAbcdfghijkmnopqruvwxyz"
    I set the mode to "Decrypt" and copy/pasted in the encrypted text, then (like you) tried entering various related keywords, but the decoded text below never look intelligible. It is nice that the site does the decryption in realtime, so you can quickly see if you got it right, but so far I didn't find the answer. Either I didn't guess the Passphrase, or we are doing this wrong.


    I am a little confused by the whole concept of autokey encryption.
    It seems that the key is a secret keyword + the contents of the original plain text.
    So, to decrypt it seems like you would need to know at least part of the original message.
    Or the secret keyword is as long as the whole message. That would be a LONG passphrase...
     
  18. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    I would guess that the keyword from that is Tesla!
     
  19. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Well, I tried TESLA, and TESLATESLATESLA repeating a bunch of times, but "no dice".

    Maybe the old Alphabet Key is wrong. Or maybe Vigenere-Autokey isn't it.

    There are many ways we could do this wrong and end up with a useless result.
    Perfection or bust.
     
  20. Banahogg

    Banahogg Member

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    It might be better to do analysis rather than key guessing. In the wikipedia article (Autokey cipher - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia), it describes how to try using common words as a crib. If we assume the punctuation is correct, then "E’JX" in the cipher text is probably either "I'll" or "I've", which could be a good crib.

    I can't try it myself until later tonight, but thought I'd mention it.
     

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